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Home Health & Fitness Vaginal delivery, breastfeeding associated with a lower allergic load

Vaginal delivery, breastfeeding associated with a lower allergic load

HOUSTON – Vaginal birth and breastfeeding children were less likely to develop allergies, according to findings from the study presented at the American College of Asthma's Scientific Meeting, Allergy & Immunology.

"These results add to our growing knowledge of the impact of childbirth and infant feeding on susceptibility to allergic diseases," Stanislaw J. Gabryszewski, MD, PhD, of allergy and immunology at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told participants. "They suggest that vaginal delivery and breastfeeding correlate with a reduced risk and burden of allergic disease."

Although previous study results suggested that vaginal delivery and breastfeeding were linked to a lower risk of unique allergies, no previous study had examined whether or not these factors had an impact on the development of multiple allergies.

To evaluate the impact of childbirth and nutrition on multiple conditions, the researchers evaluated patients from a virtual birth cohort of infants treated at 31 different primary care centers. Software has been used to identify patients with zero, at least one, two, three or four allergic conditions, including eczema, IgE-induced food allergy and asthma.

Pregnant women at the hospital

The results of the study presented at the American College of Asthma's Scientific Meeting, Allergy & Immunology revealed that vaginal deliveries and those who were breastfed had a lower risk of developing allergies .

Source: Adobe Stock

The researchers calculated the risk ratio to assess the effects of vaginal and caesarean deliveries and how the infant was fed (formula, formula, or both) at the same time. development of allergic conditions.

Vaginal delivery was associated with a reduced rate of development of at least one (HR = 0.89; P 0.001), two (HR = 0.83; P 0.001), three (HR = 0.84; P 0.001) and four (HR = 0.79; P .001) allergic conditions.

Breastfeeding alone was associated with a reduced rate of development of at least one (HR = 0.74; P 0.001), two (HR = 0.75; P 0.001) or three (HR = 0.89; P .001), and feeding with breast milk and formula was associated with a lower rate of development of at least one condition (HR = 0.94; P .001).

"From a practical point of view, this suggests that the use of breast milk to the extent possible could be predisposed to a less allergic disease over time," Gabryszewski said.

He noted that while there are many factors in food decisions and clear indications for cesarean delivery, physicians should consider reducing the burden of allergic diseases in patients who are undecided about their method of delivery or feeding. – by Erin Michael

Reference:

Gabryszewski SJ, et al. P359. Presented at: Scientific Meeting of the American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology; November 7-11, 2019; Houston.

Disclosures: L & # 39; study was supported by the NIH NIDDK Award and the ACAAI SPARK Program. The authors do not report any relevant financial information.

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