Trojans spread as a computer worm

It’s the first patch Tuesday of the year – and it addresses several critical security holes in Microsoft software. A loophole, for example, allowed a Trojan horse to spread independently as a computer worm.

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Microsoft’s Patch Tuesday is always on the second Tuesday of the month. On this day – in Germany it is often Wednesday night – the latest updates are played out, with which, among other things, critical security gaps are closed.

This time, too, users should download and install the updates promptly, because this time Microsoft is devoting itself to six holes that were previously unknown – as well as over 80 other possible vulnerabilities. In addition to numerous Windows versions, Microsoft Exchange.Server, Microsoft Office, Windows Defender and Microsoft Teams are also affected.

Several zero-day gaps closed

The zero-day gaps allowed various forms of attacks, none of which, according to Microsoft, has so far been exploited. Another vulnerability, which affects Windows 10 and Windows 11, among others, is particularly critical. Here attackers can execute code remotely by sending manipulated data packets.

Particularly explosive: The vulnerability is “wormable”, as Microsoft writes – malicious code can spread through it independently. Windows 10, Windows 11 and Windows Server 2019 are affected.

Among the numerous repaired vulnerabilities are some more that Microsoft classifies as critical and should be closed in any case.

In the best case scenario, users should therefore set up automatic updates under Windows. You can activate this under Windows 11 by clicking on Start> Settings> Windows Update and making the settings here. Here you can also start the search for updates manually.

It works very similarly in Windows 10. Click Start, then click Settings> Update & Security> Windows updates.

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