New findings about convalescent plasma and vitamin D supplementation known – healing practice

COVID-19 therapy with recovered plasma and vitamin D?

Research into effective drugs against the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been researched around the world since the beginning of the pandemic, but so far there has been no real breakthrough. Some hopes are placed in treatments with blood plasma from those who have recovered. The administration of vitamin D is also being discussed as a possible therapy aid. But more recent findings indicate that these therapeutic approaches are little or no effective.

Especially at the beginning of the corona pandemic, COVID-19 sufferers were also treated with the blood plasma of recovered corona patients in numerous clinics. In addition, vitamin D supplementation was discussed as a therapeutic approach in specialist circles. Unfortunately, however, the systematic reviews show little or no effectiveness for both therapies. There is now robust evidence on plasma therapy, while the study situation for vitamin D is currently still very uncertain.

Finding effective therapies

As the research network Cochrane writes in a recent press release, vaccinations against COVID-19 are making good progress in many countries. On the other hand, the search for effective therapies for COVID-19 patients has so far been less positive.

According to the experts, the number of more or less plausible approaches is difficult to keep track of, and the results from sometimes unreliable studies are often contradicting one another.

According to the information, the evidence ecosystem CEOsys, a research association of 20 German university hospitals financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, in which Cochrane is also involved, has set itself the goal of summarizing the results of the steadily growing number of clinical studies.

The scientists at CEOsys sift through and evaluate all available study results and create closely updated syntheses of evidence that reflect the current state of research. These syntheses of evidence by CEOsys are the basis for numerous recommendations of the German S3 guideline for inpatient treatment of COVID-19.

This work from CEOsys will now also be part of a series of probably ten Cochrane reviews on approaches to COVID-19 therapy that are to appear in the coming weeks. It starts with reviews of convalescent plasma and vitamin D.

Rekonvaleszenten-Plasma

First, on May 20, the fourth update of the Cochrane Review on the effects of so-called convalescent plasma was published. This is blood plasma from donors who have recovered from COVID-19.

It contains antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and could help the immune system of sick recipients in the fight against the virus, so the hope. However, the evidence summarized in the review from nine randomized controlled studies of high reliability with over 12,000 participants does not confirm this:

“It is regrettable, but all the more important to know: Convalescent plasma is not an effective therapy for patients who are treated in hospital due to the severity of their COVID-19 disease,” explains the main author of the review, Vanessa Piechotta from the University Hospital Cologne and Cochrane Hematology.

In an interview on the German-language Cochrane blog “Wissen Was Wirkt”, the expert also says: “We cannot yet draw a complete line on the subject of plasma therapy, because we still have to clarify some remaining uncertainties.”

Vitamin-D-Supplementierung

The new Cochrane Review, also created by Cochrane Haematology, on the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of COVID-19 was published on May 24th.

The approach is primarily based on the observation that people with COVID-19 often have low vitamin D levels. However, it is controversial whether this is a causal relationship.

The results of the current review are far less clear. The authors conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19.

However, the scientists found a number of ongoing studies that could soon allow a better assessment of this approach. These will then be included in the updates to the review that will be planned soon. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Cochrane Germany: COVID-19 therapy: Cochrane reviews on convalescent plasma and vitamin D, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Cochrane Germany
  • Vanessa Piechotta, Claire Iannizzi, Khai Li Chai, Sarah J Valk, Catherine Kimber, Elena Dorando, Ina Monsef, Erica M Wood, Abigail A Lamikanra, David J Roberts, Zoe McQuilten, Cynthia So-Osman, Lise J Estcourt, Nicole Skoetz: Convalescent plasma or hyperimmune immunoglobulin for people with COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 20.05.2021), Cochrane Libary
  • Cochrane Germany: Blog Knowledge What Works: COVID-19 therapy with convalescent plasma: No effect in the case of more severe courses, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Knowledge Was Works
  • Julia Kristin Stroehlein, Julia Wallqvist, Claire Iannizzi, Agata Mikolajewska, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Carina Benstoem, Patrick Meybohm, Marie Becker, Nicole Skoetz, Miriam Stegemann, Vanessa Piechotta: Vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 24.05.2021), Cochrane Libary

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

New findings about blood plasma and vitamin D supplementation known – healing practice

COVID-19 therapy with recovered plasma and vitamin D?

Research into effective drugs against the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been researched around the world since the beginning of the pandemic, but so far there has been no real breakthrough. Some hopes are placed in treatments with blood plasma from those who have recovered. The administration of vitamin D is also being discussed as a possible therapy aid. But more recent findings indicate that these therapeutic approaches are little or no effective.

Especially at the beginning of the corona pandemic, COVID-19 sufferers were also treated with the blood plasma of recovered corona patients in numerous clinics. In addition, vitamin D supplementation was discussed as a therapeutic approach in specialist circles. Unfortunately, however, the systematic reviews show little or no effectiveness for both therapies. There is now robust evidence on plasma therapy, while the study situation for vitamin D is currently still very uncertain.

Finding effective therapies

As the research network Cochrane writes in a recent press release, vaccinations against COVID-19 are making good progress in many countries. On the other hand, the search for effective therapies for COVID-19 patients has so far been less positive.

According to the experts, the number of more or less plausible approaches is difficult to keep track of, and the results from sometimes unreliable studies often contradict each other.

According to the information, the evidence ecosystem CEOsys, a research association of 20 German university hospitals financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, in which Cochrane is also involved, has set itself the goal of summarizing the results of the steadily growing number of clinical studies.

The scientists at CEOsys sift through and evaluate all available study results and create closely updated syntheses of evidence that reflect the current state of research. These syntheses of evidence by CEOsys are the basis for numerous recommendations of the German S3 guideline for inpatient treatment of COVID-19.

This work from CEOsys will now also be part of a series of probably ten Cochrane reviews on approaches to COVID-19 therapy that are to appear in the coming weeks. It starts with reviews of convalescent plasma and vitamin D.

Rekonvaleszenten-Plasma

The fourth update of the Cochrane Review on the effects of so-called convalescent plasma was published on May 20. This is blood plasma from donors who have recovered from COVID-19.

It contains antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and could help the immune system of sick recipients in the fight against the virus, so the hope. However, the evidence summarized in the review from nine randomized controlled studies of high reliability with over 12,000 participants does not confirm this:

“It is regrettable, but all the more important to know: Convalescent plasma is not an effective therapy for patients who are treated in hospital due to the severity of their COVID-19 disease,” explains the main author of the review, Vanessa Piechotta from the University Hospital Cologne and Cochrane Hematology.

In an interview on the German-language Cochrane blog “Wissen Was Wirkt”, the expert also says: “We cannot yet draw a complete line on the subject of plasma therapy, because we still have to clarify some remaining uncertainties.”

Vitamin-D-Supplementierung

The new Cochrane Review, also created by Cochrane Haematology, on the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of COVID-19 was published on May 24th.

The approach is primarily based on the observation that people with COVID-19 often have low vitamin D levels. However, it is controversial whether this is a causal relationship.

The results of the current review are far less clear. The authors conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19.

However, the scientists found a number of ongoing studies that could soon allow a better assessment of this approach. These will then be included in the updates to the review that will be planned soon. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Cochrane Germany: COVID-19 therapy: Cochrane reviews on convalescent plasma and vitamin D, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Cochrane Germany
  • Vanessa Piechotta, Claire Iannizzi, Khai Li Chai, Sarah J Valk, Catherine Kimber, Elena Dorando, Ina Monsef, Erica M Wood, Abigail A Lamikanra, David J Roberts, Zoe McQuilten, Cynthia So-Osman, Lise J Estcourt, Nicole Skoetz: Convalescent plasma or hyperimmune immunoglobulin for people with COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 20.05.2021), Cochrane Libary
  • Cochrane Germany: Blog Knowledge What Works: COVID-19 therapy with convalescent plasma: No effect in the case of more severe courses, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Knowledge Was Works
  • Julia Kristin Stroehlein, Julia Wallqvist, Claire Iannizzi, Agata Mikolajewska, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Carina Benstoem, Patrick Meybohm, Marie Becker, Nicole Skoetz, Miriam Stegemann, Vanessa Piechotta: Vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 24.05.2021), Cochrane Libary

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

New findings about plasma therapy and vitamin D supplementation known – healing practice

COVID-19 therapy with recovered plasma and vitamin D?

Research into effective drugs against the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been researched around the world since the beginning of the pandemic, but so far there has been no real breakthrough. Some hopes are placed in treatments with blood plasma from those who have recovered. The administration of vitamin D is also being discussed as a possible therapy aid. But more recent findings indicate that these therapeutic approaches are little or no effective.

Especially at the beginning of the corona pandemic, COVID-19 sufferers were also treated with the blood plasma of recovered corona patients in numerous clinics. In addition, vitamin D supplementation was discussed as a therapeutic approach in specialist circles. Unfortunately, however, the systematic reviews show little or no effectiveness for both therapies. There is now robust evidence on plasma therapy, while the study situation for vitamin D is currently still very uncertain.

Finding effective therapies

As the research network Cochrane writes in a recent press release, vaccinations against COVID-19 are making good progress in many countries. On the other hand, the search for effective therapies for COVID-19 patients has so far been less positive.

According to the experts, the number of more or less plausible approaches is difficult to keep track of, and the results from sometimes unreliable studies are often contradicting one another.

According to the information, the evidence ecosystem CEOsys, a research association of 20 German university hospitals financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, in which Cochrane is also involved, has set itself the goal of summarizing the results of the steadily growing number of clinical studies.

The scientists at CEOsys sift through and evaluate all available study results and create closely updated syntheses of evidence that reflect the current state of research. These syntheses of evidence by CEOsys are the basis for numerous recommendations of the German S3 guideline for inpatient treatment of COVID-19.

This work from CEOsys is now also part of a series of probably ten Cochrane reviews on approaches to COVID-19 therapy that are to appear in the coming weeks. It starts with reviews of convalescent plasma and vitamin D.

Rekonvaleszenten-Plasma

First, on May 20, the fourth update of the Cochrane Review on the effects of so-called convalescent plasma was published. This is blood plasma from donors who have recovered from COVID-19.

It contains antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and could help the immune system of sick recipients in the fight against the virus, so the hope. However, the evidence summarized in the review from nine randomized controlled studies of high reliability with over 12,000 participants does not confirm this:

“It is regrettable, but all the more important to know: Convalescent plasma is not an effective therapy for patients who are treated in hospital due to the severity of their COVID-19 disease,” explains the main author of the review, Vanessa Piechotta from the University Hospital Cologne and Cochrane Hematology.

In an interview on the German-language Cochrane blog “Wissen Was Wirkt”, the expert also says: “We cannot yet draw a complete line on the subject of plasma therapy, because we still have to clarify some remaining uncertainties.”

Vitamin-D-Supplementierung

The new Cochrane Review, also created by Cochrane Haematology, on the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of COVID-19 was published on May 24th.

The approach is primarily based on the observation that people with COVID-19 often have low vitamin D levels. However, it is controversial whether this is a causal relationship.

The results of the current review are far less clear. The authors conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19.

However, the scientists found a number of ongoing studies that could soon allow a better assessment of this approach. These will then be included in the updates to the review that will be planned soon. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Cochrane Germany: COVID-19 therapy: Cochrane reviews on convalescent plasma and vitamin D, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Cochrane Germany
  • Vanessa Piechotta, Claire Iannizzi, Khai Li Chai, Sarah J Valk, Catherine Kimber, Elena Dorando, Ina Monsef, Erica M Wood, Abigail A Lamikanra, David J Roberts, Zoe McQuilten, Cynthia So-Osman, Lise J Estcourt, Nicole Skoetz: Convalescent plasma or hyperimmune immunoglobulin for people with COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 20.05.2021), Cochrane Libary
  • Cochrane Germany: Blog Knowledge What Works: COVID-19 therapy with convalescent plasma: No effect in the case of more severe courses, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Knowledge Was Works
  • Julia Kristin Stroehlein, Julia Wallqvist, Claire Iannizzi, Agata Mikolajewska, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Carina Benstoem, Patrick Meybohm, Marie Becker, Nicole Skoetz, Miriam Stegemann, Vanessa Piechotta: Vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 24.05.2021), Cochrane Libary

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

New findings on plasma therapy and vitamin D supplementation published – Heilpraxis

COVID-19 therapy with recovered plasma and vitamin D?

Research into effective drugs against the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been researched around the world since the beginning of the pandemic, but so far there has been no real breakthrough. Some hopes are placed in treatments with blood plasma from those who have recovered. The administration of vitamin D is also being discussed as a possible therapy aid. But more recent findings indicate that these therapeutic approaches are little or no effective.

Especially at the beginning of the corona pandemic, COVID-19 sufferers were also treated with the blood plasma of recovered corona patients in numerous clinics. In addition, vitamin D supplementation was discussed as a therapeutic approach in specialist circles. Unfortunately, however, the systematic reviews show little or no effectiveness for both therapies. There is now robust evidence on plasma therapy, while the study situation for vitamin D is currently still very uncertain.

Finding effective therapies

As the research network Cochrane writes in a recent press release, vaccinations against COVID-19 are making good progress in many countries. On the other hand, the search for effective therapies for COVID-19 patients has so far been less positive.

According to the experts, the number of more or less plausible approaches is difficult to keep track of, and the results from sometimes unreliable studies are often contradicting one another.

According to the information, the evidence ecosystem CEOsys, a research association of 20 German university hospitals financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, in which Cochrane is also involved, has set itself the goal of summarizing the results of the steadily growing number of clinical studies.

The scientists at CEOsys sift through and evaluate all available study results and create closely updated syntheses of evidence that reflect the current state of research. These syntheses of evidence by CEOsys are the basis for numerous recommendations of the German S3 guideline for inpatient treatment of COVID-19.

This work from CEOsys is now also part of a series of probably ten Cochrane reviews on approaches to COVID-19 therapy that are to appear in the coming weeks. It starts with reviews of convalescent plasma and vitamin D.

Rekonvaleszenten-Plasma

First, on May 20, the fourth update of the Cochrane Review on the effects of so-called convalescent plasma was published. This is blood plasma from donors who have recovered from COVID-19.

It contains antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and could help the immune system of sick recipients in the fight against the virus, so the hope. However, the evidence summarized in the review from nine randomized controlled studies of high reliability with over 12,000 participants does not confirm this:

“It is regrettable, but all the more important to know: Convalescent plasma is not an effective therapy for patients who are treated in hospital due to the severity of their COVID-19 disease,” explains the main author of the review, Vanessa Piechotta from the University Hospital Cologne and Cochrane Hematology.

In an interview on the German-language Cochrane blog “Wissen Was Wirkt”, the expert also says: “We cannot yet draw a complete line on the subject of plasma therapy, because we still have to clarify some remaining uncertainties.”

Vitamin-D-Supplementierung

The new Cochrane Review, also created by Cochrane Haematology, on the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of COVID-19 was published on May 24th.

The approach is primarily based on the observation that people with COVID-19 often have low vitamin D levels. However, it is controversial whether this is a causal relationship.

The results of the current review are far less clear. The authors conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19.

However, the scientists found a number of ongoing studies that could soon allow a better assessment of this approach. These will then be included in the updates to the review that will be planned soon. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Cochrane Germany: COVID-19 therapy: Cochrane reviews on convalescent plasma and vitamin D, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Cochrane Germany
  • Vanessa Piechotta, Claire Iannizzi, Khai Li Chai, Sarah J Valk, Catherine Kimber, Elena Dorando, Ina Monsef, Erica M Wood, Abigail A Lamikanra, David J Roberts, Zoe McQuilten, Cynthia So-Osman, Lise J Estcourt, Nicole Skoetz: Convalescent plasma or hyperimmune immunoglobulin for people with COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 20.05.2021), Cochrane Libary
  • Cochrane Germany: Blog Knowledge What Works: COVID-19 therapy with convalescent plasma: No effect in the case of more severe courses, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Knowledge Was Works
  • Julia Kristin Stroehlein, Julia Wallqvist, Claire Iannizzi, Agata Mikolajewska, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Carina Benstoem, Patrick Meybohm, Marie Becker, Nicole Skoetz, Miriam Stegemann, Vanessa Piechotta: Vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 24.05.2021), Cochrane Libary

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

New findings on blood plasma and vitamin D supplementation published – Heilpraxis

COVID-19 therapy with recovered plasma and vitamin D?

Research into effective drugs against the COVID-19 disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been researched around the world since the beginning of the pandemic, but so far there has been no real breakthrough. Some hopes are placed in treatments with blood plasma from those who have recovered. The administration of vitamin D is also being discussed as a possible therapy aid. But more recent findings indicate that these therapeutic approaches are little or no effective.

Especially at the beginning of the corona pandemic, COVID-19 sufferers were also treated with the blood plasma of recovered corona patients in numerous clinics. In addition, vitamin D supplementation was discussed as a therapeutic approach in specialist circles. Unfortunately, however, the systematic reviews show little or no effectiveness for both therapies. There is now robust evidence on plasma therapy, while the study situation for vitamin D is currently still very uncertain.

Finding effective therapies

As the research network Cochrane writes in a recent press release, vaccinations against COVID-19 are making good progress in many countries. On the other hand, the search for effective therapies for COVID-19 patients has so far been less positive.

According to the experts, the number of more or less plausible approaches is difficult to keep track of, and the results from sometimes unreliable studies are often contradicting one another.

According to the information, the evidence ecosystem CEOsys, a research association of 20 German university hospitals financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, in which Cochrane is also involved, has set itself the goal of summarizing the results of the steadily growing number of clinical studies.

The scientists at CEOsys sift through and evaluate all available study results and create closely updated syntheses of evidence that reflect the current state of research. These syntheses of evidence by CEOsys are the basis for numerous recommendations of the German S3 guideline for inpatient treatment of COVID-19.

This work from CEOsys is now also part of a series of probably ten Cochrane reviews on approaches to COVID-19 therapy that are to appear in the coming weeks. It starts with reviews of convalescent plasma and vitamin D.

Rekonvaleszenten-Plasma

First, on May 20, the fourth update of the Cochrane Review on the effects of so-called convalescent plasma was published. This is blood plasma from donors who have recovered from COVID-19.

It contains antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and could help the immune system of sick recipients in the fight against the virus, so the hope. However, the evidence summarized in the review from nine randomized controlled studies of high reliability with over 12,000 participants does not confirm this:

“It is regrettable, but all the more important to know: Convalescent plasma is not an effective therapy for patients who are treated in hospital due to the severity of their COVID-19 disease,” explains the main author of the review, Vanessa Piechotta from the University Hospital Cologne and Cochrane Hematology.

In an interview on the German-language Cochrane blog “Wissen Was Wirkt”, the expert also says: “We cannot yet draw a complete line on the subject of plasma therapy, because we still have to clarify some remaining uncertainties.”

Vitamin-D-Supplementierung

The new Cochrane Review, also created by Cochrane Haematology, on the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of COVID-19 was published on May 24th.

The approach is primarily based on the observation that people with COVID-19 often have low vitamin D levels. However, it is controversial whether this is a causal relationship.

The results of the current review are far less clear. The authors conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to determine the benefits and harms of vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID-19.

However, the scientists found a number of ongoing studies that could soon allow a better assessment of this approach. These will then be included in the updates to the review that will be planned soon. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Cochrane Germany: COVID-19 therapy: Cochrane reviews on convalescent plasma and vitamin D, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Cochrane Germany
  • Vanessa Piechotta, Claire Iannizzi, Khai Li Chai, Sarah J Valk, Catherine Kimber, Elena Dorando, Ina Monsef, Erica M Wood, Abigail A Lamikanra, David J Roberts, Zoe McQuilten, Cynthia So-Osman, Lise J Estcourt, Nicole Skoetz: Convalescent plasma or hyperimmune immunoglobulin for people with COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 20.05.2021), Cochrane Libary
  • Cochrane Germany: Blog Knowledge What Works: COVID-19 therapy with convalescent plasma: No effect in the case of more severe courses, (accessed: June 8, 2021), Knowledge Was Works
  • Julia Kristin Stroehlein, Julia Wallqvist, Claire Iannizzi, Agata Mikolajewska, Maria-Inti Metzendorf, Carina Benstoem, Patrick Meybohm, Marie Becker, Nicole Skoetz, Miriam Stegemann, Vanessa Piechotta: Vitamin D supplementation for the treatment of COVID‐19: a living systematic review; in: Cochrane Libary, (veröffentlicht: 24.05.2021), Cochrane Libary

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Vitamin D food supplements are not a protective measure – healing practice

Corona: No protection from vitamin D food supplements

In the past few months, it has been reported time and again that taking vitamin D food supplements can reduce the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and developing severe COVID-19. However, new findings now indicate that increasing the vitamin D level does not offer any protection here.

While previous research at the start of the pandemic suggested that vitamin D reduced the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a new study from McGill University in Montreal, Canada finds there is no evidence that that Vitamin acts as a protective measure against the virus or the COVID-19 disease caused by the pathogen, according to a recent press release.

No protection against severe progress

According to the researchers, the study does not support vitamin D supplementation as a measure to improve the pandemic. “Above all, our results suggest that priority should be given to investing in other therapeutic or preventive options for randomized clinical trials on COVID-19,” say the authors.

To assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and the susceptibility and severity of COVID-19, the scientists performed a Mendelian randomization with genetic variants that are strongly linked to increased vitamin D levels.

They looked at genetic variants of 14,134 people with COVID-19 and over 1.2 million people without the disease from eleven countries.

In the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researchers found that vitamin D levels in people who developed the disease had no effect on the likelihood of being hospitalized or of becoming seriously ill.

Taking nutritional supplements?

At the beginning of the pandemic, many researchers examined the effects of vitamin D, which plays a crucial role in a healthy immune system. However, there is not enough evidence that taking supplements can prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Most vitamin D studies are very difficult to interpret because they cannot take into account the known risk factors for severe COVID-19 such as old age or chronic diseases, which are also predictors of vitamin D deficiency,” says Co -Author Guillaume Butler of McGill University.

“The best way to answer the question about the effect of vitamin D would therefore be randomized studies, which are complex and resource-intensive and take a long time during a pandemic,” says the doctor.

The researchers say that by using Mendelian randomization, they were able to reduce potential bias from these known risk factors and provide a clearer picture of the relationship between vitamin D and COVID-19.

Study with limitations

However, the researchers also found that their study had some important limitations. No patients with real vitamin D deficiency were taken into account, so it is possible that they could benefit in connection with protection against corona infection and severe disease.

In addition, the study only analyzed genetic variants of people of European descent. Future studies are needed to investigate the relationship with vitamin D and COVID-19 outcomes in other populations, say the researchers.

In the current study, Mendel’s randomization shows “no clear evidence that vitamin D supplementation has a major impact on the results of COVID-19,” says Butler-Laporte, microbiologist and expert on infectious diseases. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • McGill University: Vitamin D may not protect against COVID-19, as previously suggested, (Abruf: 06.06.2021), McGill University
  • Guillaume Butler-Laporte, Tomoko Nakanishi, Vincent Mooser, David R. Morrison, Tala Abdullah, Olumide Adeleye, Noor Mamlouk, Nofar Kimchi, Zaman Afrasiabi, Nardin Rezk, Annarita Giliberti, Alessandra Renieri, Yiheng Chen, Sirui Zhou, Vincenzo Forgetta & J. Brent Richards: Vitamin D and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity in the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative: A Mendelian randomization study; in: PLOS Medicine, (veröffentlicht: 01.06.2021), PLOS Medicine

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

No protection from increased vitamin D levels – healing practice

Corona: Vitamin D food supplements are not a protective measure

In recent months, it has been reported time and again that taking vitamin D food supplements can reduce the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and developing severe COVID-19. However, new findings now indicate that increasing the vitamin D level does not offer any protection here.

While previous research at the start of the pandemic suggested that vitamin D reduced the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a new study from McGill University in Montreal, Canada finds there is no evidence that that Vitamin acts as a protective measure against the virus or the COVID-19 disease caused by the pathogen, according to a recent press release.

No protection against severe progress

According to the researchers, the study does not support vitamin D supplementation as a measure to improve the pandemic. “Above all, our results suggest that priority should be given to investing in other therapeutic or preventive options for randomized clinical trials on COVID-19,” say the authors.

To assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and the susceptibility and severity of COVID-19, the scientists performed a Mendelian randomization with genetic variants that are strongly linked to increased vitamin D levels.

They looked at genetic variants of 14,134 people with COVID-19 and over 1.2 million people without the disease from eleven countries.

In the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researchers found that vitamin D levels in people who developed the disease had no effect on the likelihood of being hospitalized or of becoming seriously ill.

Taking nutritional supplements?

At the beginning of the pandemic, many researchers examined the effects of vitamin D, which plays a crucial role in a healthy immune system. However, there is not enough evidence that taking supplements can prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Most vitamin D studies are very difficult to interpret because they cannot take into account the known risk factors for severe COVID-19 such as old age or chronic diseases, which are also predictors of vitamin D deficiency,” says Co -Author Guillaume Butler of McGill University.

“The best way to answer the question about the effect of vitamin D would therefore be randomized studies, which are complex and resource-intensive and take a long time during a pandemic,” says the doctor.

The researchers say that by using Mendelian randomization, they were able to reduce potential bias from these known risk factors and provide a clearer picture of the relationship between vitamin D and COVID-19.

Study with limitations

However, the researchers also found that their study had some important limitations. No patients with real vitamin D deficiency were taken into account, so it is possible that they could benefit in connection with protection against corona infection and severe disease.

In addition, the study only analyzed genetic variants of people of European descent. Future studies are needed to investigate the relationship with vitamin D and COVID-19 outcomes in other populations, say the researchers.

In the current study, Mendel’s randomization shows “no clear evidence that vitamin D supplementation has a major impact on the results of COVID-19,” says Butler-Laporte, microbiologist and expert on infectious diseases. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • McGill University: Vitamin D may not protect against COVID-19, as previously suggested, (Abruf: 06.06.2021), McGill University
  • Guillaume Butler-Laporte, Tomoko Nakanishi, Vincent Mooser, David R. Morrison, Tala Abdullah, Olumide Adeleye, Noor Mamlouk, Nofar Kimchi, Zaman Afrasiabi, Nardin Rezk, Annarita Giliberti, Alessandra Renieri, Yiheng Chen, Sirui Zhou, Vincenzo Forgetta & J. Brent Richards: Vitamin D and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity in the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative: A Mendelian randomization study; in: PLOS Medicine, (veröffentlicht: 01.06.2021), PLOS Medicine

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

No protection from vitamin D food supplements – healing practice

Corona: Vitamin D food supplements are not a protective measure

In recent months, it has been reported time and again that taking vitamin D food supplements can reduce the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and developing severe COVID-19. However, new findings now indicate that increasing the vitamin D level does not offer any protection here.

While previous research at the start of the pandemic suggested that vitamin D reduced the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a new study from McGill University in Montreal, Canada finds there is no evidence that that Vitamin acts as a protective measure against the virus or the COVID-19 disease caused by the pathogen, according to a recent press release.

No protection against severe progress

According to the researchers, the study does not support vitamin D supplementation as a measure to improve the pandemic. “Above all, our results suggest that priority should be given to investing in other therapeutic or preventive options for randomized clinical trials on COVID-19,” say the authors.

To assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and the susceptibility and severity of COVID-19, the scientists performed a Mendelian randomization with genetic variants that are strongly linked to increased vitamin D levels.

They looked at genetic variants of 14,134 people with COVID-19 and over 1.2 million people without the disease from eleven countries.

In the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researchers found that vitamin D levels in people who developed the disease had no effect on the likelihood of being hospitalized or of becoming seriously ill.

Taking nutritional supplements?

At the beginning of the pandemic, many researchers examined the effects of vitamin D, which plays a crucial role in a healthy immune system. However, there is not enough evidence that taking supplements can prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Most vitamin D studies are very difficult to interpret because they cannot take into account the known risk factors for severe COVID-19 such as old age or chronic diseases, which are also predictors of vitamin D deficiency,” says Co -Author Guillaume Butler of McGill University.

“The best way to answer the question about the effect of vitamin D would therefore be randomized studies, which are complex and resource-intensive and take a long time during a pandemic,” says the doctor.

The researchers say that by using Mendelian randomization, they were able to reduce potential bias from these known risk factors and provide a clearer picture of the relationship between vitamin D and COVID-19.

Study with limitations

However, the researchers also found that their study had some important limitations. No patients with real vitamin D deficiency were taken into account, so it is possible that they could benefit in connection with protection against corona infection and severe disease.

In addition, the study only analyzed genetic variants of people of European descent. Future studies are needed to investigate the relationship with vitamin D and COVID-19 outcomes in other populations, say the researchers.

In the current study, Mendel’s randomization shows “no clear evidence that vitamin D supplementation has a major impact on the results of COVID-19,” says Butler-Laporte, microbiologist and expert on infectious diseases. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • McGill University: Vitamin D may not protect against COVID-19, as previously suggested, (Abruf: 06.06.2021), McGill University
  • Guillaume Butler-Laporte, Tomoko Nakanishi, Vincent Mooser, David R. Morrison, Tala Abdullah, Olumide Adeleye, Noor Mamlouk, Nofar Kimchi, Zaman Afrasiabi, Nardin Rezk, Annarita Giliberti, Alessandra Renieri, Yiheng Chen, Sirui Zhou, Vincenzo Forgetta & J. Brent Richards: Vitamin D and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity in the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative: A Mendelian randomization study; in: PLOS Medicine, (veröffentlicht: 01.06.2021), PLOS Medicine

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

No protection by increasing the vitamin D level – healing practice

Corona: Vitamin D food supplements are not a protective measure

In recent months, it has been reported time and again that taking vitamin D food supplements can reduce the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and developing severe COVID-19. However, new findings now indicate that increasing the vitamin D level does not offer any protection here.

While previous research at the start of the pandemic suggested that vitamin D reduced the risk of contracting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, a new study from McGill University in Montreal, Canada finds there is no evidence that that Vitamin acts as a protective measure against the virus or the COVID-19 disease caused by the pathogen, according to a recent press release.

No protection against severe progress

According to the researchers, the study does not support vitamin D supplementation as a measure to improve the pandemic. “Above all, our results suggest that priority should be given to investing in other therapeutic or preventive options for randomized clinical trials on COVID-19,” say the authors.

To assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and the susceptibility and severity of COVID-19, the scientists performed a Mendelian randomization with genetic variants that are strongly linked to increased vitamin D levels.

They looked at genetic variants of 14,134 people with COVID-19 and over 1.2 million people without the disease from eleven countries.

In the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, the researchers found that vitamin D levels in people who developed the disease had no effect on the likelihood of being hospitalized or of becoming seriously ill.

Taking nutritional supplements?

At the beginning of the pandemic, many researchers examined the effects of vitamin D, which plays a crucial role in a healthy immune system. However, there is not enough evidence that taking supplements can prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Most vitamin D studies are very difficult to interpret because they cannot take into account the known risk factors for severe COVID-19 such as old age or chronic diseases, which are also predictors of vitamin D deficiency,” says Co -Author Guillaume Butler of McGill University.

“The best way to answer the question about the effect of vitamin D would therefore be randomized studies, which are complex and resource-intensive and take a long time during a pandemic,” says the doctor.

The researchers say that by using Mendelian randomization, they were able to reduce potential bias from these known risk factors and provide a clearer picture of the relationship between vitamin D and COVID-19.

Study with limitations

However, the researchers also found that their study had some important limitations. No patients with real vitamin D deficiency were taken into account, so it is possible that they could benefit in connection with protection against corona infection and severe disease.

In addition, the study only analyzed genetic variants of people of European descent. Future studies are needed to investigate the relationship with vitamin D and COVID-19 outcomes in other populations, say the researchers.

In the current study, Mendel’s randomization shows “no clear evidence that vitamin D supplementation has a major impact on the results of COVID-19,” says Butler-Laporte, microbiologist and expert on infectious diseases. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • McGill University: Vitamin D may not protect against COVID-19, as previously suggested, (Abruf: 06.06.2021), McGill University
  • Guillaume Butler-Laporte, Tomoko Nakanishi, Vincent Mooser, David R. Morrison, Tala Abdullah, Olumide Adeleye, Noor Mamlouk, Nofar Kimchi, Zaman Afrasiabi, Nardin Rezk, Annarita Giliberti, Alessandra Renieri, Yiheng Chen, Sirui Zhou, Vincenzo Forgetta & J. Brent Richards: Vitamin D and COVID-19 susceptibility and severity in the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative: A Mendelian randomization study; in: PLOS Medicine, (veröffentlicht: 01.06.2021), PLOS Medicine

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.