Adolescent has 82 (!!!) instead of 32 teeth

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July 17, 2021 – 11:02 am Clock

Oh you big cheek!

A teenager is admitted to a special hospital with severe pain. His jaw was way too big and deformed. After the X-rays, the doctors can hardly believe their eyes. What they discover there, they have never seen before!

The whole mouth is full of teeth

Nitish has not been able to chew properly for a long time, the pain is simply too great.

© Jam Press/Rare Shot News

Nitish Kumar can barely close his mouth. His jaw is swollen below the ears and protrudes sharply from under his cheeks. The entire face of the 17-year-old Indian is disfigured, or at least severely deformed. The teenager has had a tumor for five years – and no one can help him. He is in severe pain and in desperation goes to the Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Bihar, a hospital with specialist doctors.

And they hardly believe their eyes when they look into Nitish’s mouth. Teeth, teeth everywhere! To get an accurate diagnosis, they slide Nitish to the X-ray. And now see the full extent of the tumor.

Reading tip: Jürgen Milski was also shock diagnosed with a jaw tumor! Read here how he discovered it.

First the shock – then the operation

On Nitish's x-ray one can clearly see;  there are far too many teeth in his jaw.

On Nitish’s x-ray one can clearly see; there are far too many teeth in his jaw.

© Jam Press/Rare Shot News

They count 82 teeth in the teenager’s mouth. For comparison: adults normally have 32 teeth. 16 teeth in the upper jaw and 16 teeth in the lower jaw. And there are even 4 wisdom teeth included.

So poor Nitish has 82 teeth, almost three times as many pearly whites as the average adult!

The diagnosis: complex odontoma. Odontomas are tumor-like malformations that can consist of tooth enamel, in which teeth grow. Since odontomas do not cause discomfort, they are discovered more by chance. They grow slowly and painlessly – until at some point there is not enough space in the jaw. As in the case of Nitish.

But how does a complex odontoma arise and how often does it happen? We have discussed this with the oral surgeon Dr. med. Dr. med. dent. Philipp Scherer spoke.

In a three-hour operation, the doctors at the special clinic remove Nitish’s teeth and his tumor at the same time. “Just because he wasn’t treated properly for so many years could it get this bad at all,” says his doctor, Dr. Manish mandal.

Now, after the operation, Nitish can finally open and close his mouth again without pain. And hopefully this tumor will never come back.

(cga)

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Cognitive decline and dementia due to tooth loss – healing practice

How does tooth loss affect the risk of dementia?

The loss of teeth appears to play an important role in the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. The risk of cognitive decline seems to increase with every tooth lost. How great is this risk and can timely dental treatment protect against the cognitive decline that occurs?

A research group with the participation of researchers from New York University now examined how tooth loss affects the risk of developing dementia and the general decline in cognitive abilities. The results of the analysis can be found in the English-language journal “The Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine” (JAMDA).

Relationship between tooth loss and cognition

The experts report that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States, about one in six adults by the age of 65 or more has already lost all of their teeth. Previous study results have also shown a connection between tooth loss and decreased cognitive function, with a number of possible explanations for this connection.

Why does tooth loss worsen cognitive function?

Missing teeth make chewing difficult, which can contribute to nutritional deficiencies or encourage changes in the brain. A growing body of research is also pointing to a link between gum disease – a leading cause of tooth loss – and cognitive decline, the team said. In addition, tooth loss could reflect a lifelong socio-economic disadvantage, which is also a risk factor for cognitive decline.

Alzheimer’s and dementia are on the rise

“With the staggering number of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and dementia each year and the opportunity to improve oral health over the lifespan, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of the link between poor oral health and cognitive decline” , emphasizes the study author Professor Dr. With Wu from New York University.

The research group performed a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies of tooth loss and cognitive impairment. For this purpose, 14 studies were evaluated, which included a total of 34,074 adults. Decreased cognitive function was found in 4,689 participants.

How much does tooth loss increase the risk of dementia?

The experts found in their investigation that adults with more tooth loss had a 1.48 times higher risk of developing cognitive impairment and a 1.28 times higher risk of diagnosing dementia. This increased risk persisted even when other possible factors were taken into account.

Dentures protect against cognitive impairment

The team noticed that adults with tooth loss had a higher risk of cognitive impairment if they did not have dentures (23.8 percent) compared to people who had dentures (16.9 percent). An additional analysis finally showed that the association between tooth loss and cognitive impairment was not significant if the participants had dentures, the experts report.

The researchers also performed another analysis with a subset of eight studies. The aim was to determine whether there is a dose-response relationship between tooth loss and cognitive impairment. In other words, is a higher number of missing teeth associated with a higher risk of cognitive deterioration?

More lost teeth led to a higher risk

Indeed, the results confirmed such a link. The experts report that each additional missing tooth was associated with a 1.4 percent increased risk of cognitive impairment and a 1.1 percent increased risk of dementia.

Tooth loss can predict cognitive decline

“This dose-response relationship between the number of missing teeth and the risk of decreased cognitive function greatly strengthens the evidence linking tooth loss to cognitive impairment and provides some evidence that tooth loss can predict cognitive decline,” explains Study author Xiang Qi from New York University in a press release.

“Our results underscore the importance of maintaining good oral health and its role in maintaining cognitive function,” adds study author Professor Dr. Wu added. (as)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Xiang Qi, Zheng Zhu, Brenda L. Plassman, Bei Wu: Dose-Response Meta-Analysis on Tooth Loss With the Risk of Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, in The Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (veröffentlicht 08.07.2021), JAMDA
  • New York University: Tooth loss associated with increased cognitive impairment, dementia (veröffentlicht 08.07.2021), New York University

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

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7 good habits to keep your teeth healthy

5. Drink water

We need water for our health, but many people avoid drinking plain water in favor of sodas, coffee, tea and juices. While these drinks can be delicious, they can have a lasting effect on your smile. For example, it is well known that coffee and tea affect the color of teeth. In addition, sodas and juices can contain sugars and acids that damage tooth enamel.

To improve your health, opt for plain water more often, especially with and after meals. The water will wash away food debris without staining your tooth enamel, so you don’t have to worry about the negative side effects of other drinks.

6. Eat crispy fruits and vegetables

Did you know that eating solid foods is actually necessary to maintain the health of your mouth and strong jaws? A common problem with the modern diet is that not only is it focused on softer foods, but people are less likely to gravitate toward fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables.

7. Do not rush to brush your teeth after eating

One of the worst things you can do to your teeth is to brush them immediately after eating or eating sour and sweet foods. When you consume these foods and drinks, they leave some of the acid and sugar on the surface of your teeth. When you brush your teeth immediately afterwards, your toothbrush literally rubs the acid and sugar over the surface. Since these substances soften the enamel, you irritate the weakened enamel. Instead of brushing your teeth right away, wait at least 30 minutes. During this time, the tooth enamel will clear and return to normal.

Read also:

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The new method to lose weight: a “lock” in the teeth – News

The University of Otago (New Zealand) announced this Monday that a team of its researchers, in collaboration with British scientists, has developed “for the first time in the world” a device that helps to lose weight and that would help combat the “epidemic obesity world, “says Russia Today.

It is an intraoral device called DentalSlim Diet Control, which is placed on the upper and lower first molars.

It consists of stainless steel metal bands, magnets, glass ionomer-based orthodontic cement, and pins.

It enables the user to open his mouth only about 2 millimeters, restricting him to a liquid diet, but allowing him to speak and breathe freely (can be removed in an emergency).

In the detailed tests in the British Dental JournalSeven volunteers with obesity residing in the New Zealand city of Dunedin participated, who lost an average of 6,360 kilos in 15 days.

Lead researcher Professor Paul Brunton of the University of Otago believes the device will be an “effective, safe and affordable” tool for those struggling with obesity.

“It helps them establish new habits, allowing them to stick to a low-calorie diet for a period,” he said.

Brunton stressed that the use of the device has not presented adverse consequences. “It is a non-invasive, reversible, inexpensive and attractive alternative to surgical procedures,” he said.

The developers suggest using it for 15-21 days, then pausing on a less restricted diet, and then using it again.

They advise the DentalSlim Diet Control for those who have to lose weight before surgery, as well as for patients with diabetes in whom weight loss can cause a remission.

During the trial, the participants indicated that they sometimes felt uncomfortable and found life in general to be less satisfactory, but that they were happy with the result and motivated to lose more weight with the device.

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UNKNOWN OLD MAN: Israeli researchers discover remains in Israeli cement works – WELT news channel

  1. UNKNOWN OLD MAN: Israeli researchers discover remains in Israeli cement worksWORLD news channel
  2. Sensational find in Israel: Unknown prehistoric man discoveredt-online.de
  3. See “More on Topic” in Google News

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Chalk teeth in children: antibiotics can be to blame

news>

15. June 2021 – 16:40 Clock

Eight percent of children in Germany have chalk teeth

Almost half a million children in Germany suffer from so-called chalk teeth. This corresponds to around eight percent of all six to twelve year olds who complain of pain when brushing their teeth or who suffer from porous, brownish discolored teeth. This is reported in the current dental report from BARMER health insurance. Apparently there is a link between medication and dental disease.

What exactly are chalk teeth?

Chalk teeth are colloquially the teeth of children and adolescents who suffer from a tooth enamel defect. This often affects the permanent incisors and molars, which are then porous and brittle like chalk – hence the colloquial term “chalk teeth”. The consequences are usually hypersensitivity of the teeth and pain when chewing and brushing your teeth. Discoloration can also occur and caries diseases occur more frequently in chalk teeth.

Antibiotics could be a cause of the chalk teeth

There is currently a lot of research into the possible causes of porous teeth. In the current dental report, the interaction of antibiotics and chalk teeth was examined. Dr. Bernd Hillebrandt, state manager of BARMER Schleswig-Holstein emphasizes that the prescription of antibiotics would be clearly related to the appearance of chalk teeth.

However, the exact connection has not yet been established. Nevertheless, there is positive news because fewer and fewer antibiotics have been prescribed for children and adolescents in recent years. And the corona crisis also contributed to this – thanks to the distance and hygiene rules, fewer children became sick and thus fewer antibiotics were prescribed to the younger patients.

Girls are more often affected than boys

With 9.1% girls are more often affected by chalk teeth than boys with 7.6%. Thus there seems to be a connection between the child’s sex and dental disease.
“The disease is usually diagnosed in childhood after the corresponding tooth eruption from about six years of age,” says Dr. Hillebrandt. In addition, children are less likely to have chalk teeth if the mother either gave birth at a very young age or was older. However, if the mother was between 30 and 40 years old at birth, the children had more chalk teeth.

“The diet and regular tooth brushing have no influence on the development.”

The diet has no influence on the development of chalk teeth. Regular tooth brushing does not prevent porous teeth either, explains the state manager of BARMER Schleswig-Holstein. This is an important message for parents: “Because you haven’t done anything wrong! You have not failed when it comes to children’s dental hygiene,” emphasizes Dr. Bernd Hillebrandt. The exact causes of the chalk teeth still remain unclear.

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Increased risk of dementia due to gum disease – healing practice

Relationship between gum disease and dementia

Periodontitis is not only one of the most common chronic diseases of the oral cavity, but also a risk factor for Alzheimer’s, as a German research team confirms in a recent study. Treating the receding gums early and consistently could lower the risk of dementia.

Researchers at the University of Greifswald discovered a connection between periodontitis and dementia as part of a current study. Those who have chronic gum disease also appear to be at a higher risk of developing dementia than those who do not have periodontal disease. The research results were recently presented in the journal “Alzheimer’s & Dementia”.

Common disease periodontitis

Periodontitis, a permanent inflammation of the teeth supporting system, is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. In Germany alone, over 11 million people suffer from a severe form of periodontitis. After tooth decay, periodontitis is the second most common oral disease.

Consequences of periodontal disease

Untreated periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss and have an impact on overall health. Since the disease is largely painless, it is often recognized and treated late. The researchers compare periodontitis to an iceberg – the majority of the effects take place in secret.

Dental disease affects overall health

The influence of dental diseases on general health has been researched for decades. Inflammatory gum disease, from which between 15 and 45 percent of all people in this country suffer, depending on the age group, has already been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Now the researchers at the University Medical Center Greifswald have confirmed the suspected connection between Alzheimer’s and periodontitis.

Advanced statistics made it possible to prove it

“It is very difficult to conduct methodologically meaningful studies on the effects of periodontal disease, a common severe form of gum disease,” reports Dr. Christian Schwahn from the Polyclinic for Dental Prosthetics, Geriatric Dentistry and Medical Materials Science. Only recently developed statistical models would have made such evidence possible.

Moderate to strong association

“For the first time, the connection between the treatment of gum disease and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease was found in a quasi-experimental model of 177 patients treated periodontally in the Greifswald GANI-MED study (Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine) and 409 untreated participants from the SHIP study can be analyzed, ”explains the dentist. Overall, the association between Alzheimer’s and periodontal disease was rated as moderate to strong.

Periodontal disease treatment slowed loss of brain matter

MRT data from the participants served as an indicator of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Based on the data, the individual measure of the Alzheimer’s typical loss of brain substance could be measured. By comparing the various participants, it was possible to show that the treatment of periodontitis reduced the loss of brain matter.

Remarkable results

“These results are remarkable insofar as the periodontitis patients were younger than 60 years at the time of the MRI examination and the observation time between the dental treatment and the MRI examination averaged 7.3 years for the patients”, summarize the co-authors of the study Professor Thomas Kocher and Professor Hans J. Grabe.

Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease through periodontal disease treatment

“Our approach is clearly in the prevention and timely treatment of gum disease, which can be triggered by a large number of germs, in order to prevent such possible consequential damage in advance,” emphasizes Kocher.

According to the researchers, another approach is currently being tested in an American research project. The key germ of periodontitis that has migrated into the brain is fought with medication. “In this area, too, we will have to rely on observational studies that simulate a controlled clinical study in the future,” emphasizes Dr. Christian Schwahn. A clinical study with a placebo treatment is not feasible in this area for ethical and medical reasons. (vb)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Diploma-Editor (FH) Volker Blasek

Swell:

  • University of Greifswald: Greifswald study confirms: gum recession increases the risk of dementia – prevention and timely treatment of periodontitis important (published: 04.06.2021), uni-egoswald.de
  • Christian Schwahn, Stefan Frenzel, Birte Holtfreter, et al.: Effect of periodontal treatment on preclinical Alzheimer’s disease-Results of a trial emulation approach; in: Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 2021, alz-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Increased risk of dementia due to periodontitis – healing practice

Relationship between gum disease and dementia

Periodontitis is not only one of the most common chronic diseases of the oral cavity, but also a risk factor for Alzheimer’s, as a German research team confirms in a recent study. Treating the receding gums early and consistently could lower the risk of dementia.

Researchers at the University of Greifswald discovered a connection between periodontitis and dementia as part of a current study. Those who have chronic gum disease also appear to be at greater risk of developing dementia than those who do not have periodontal disease. The research results were recently presented in the journal “Alzheimer’s & Dementia”.

Common disease periodontitis

Periodontitis, a permanent inflammation of the teeth supporting structures, is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. In Germany alone, over 11 million people suffer from a severe form of periodontitis. After tooth decay, periodontitis is the second most common oral disease.

Consequences of periodontal disease

Untreated periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss and have an impact on overall health. Since the disease is largely painless, it is often recognized and treated late. The researchers compare periodontitis to an iceberg – most of the effects take place in the dark.

Dental disease affects overall health

The influence of dental diseases on general health has been researched for decades. Inflammatory gum disease, from which between 15 and 45 percent of all people in this country suffer, depending on the age group, has already been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Now the researchers at the University Medical Center Greifswald have confirmed the suspected connection between Alzheimer’s and periodontitis.

Advanced statistics made it possible to prove it

“It is very difficult to conduct methodologically meaningful studies on the effects of periodontal disease, a common severe form of gum disease,” reports Dr. Christian Schwahn from the Polyclinic for Dental Prosthetics, Geriatric Dentistry and Medical Materials Science. Only recently developed statistical models would have made such evidence possible.

Moderate to strong association

“For the first time, the connection between the treatment of gum disease and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease was found in a quasi-experimental model of 177 patients treated periodontally in the Greifswald GANI-MED study (Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine) and 409 untreated participants from the SHIP study can be analyzed, ”explains the dentist. Overall, the association between Alzheimer’s and periodontal disease was rated as moderate to strong.

Periodontal disease treatment slowed loss of brain matter

MRT data from the participants served as an indicator of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Based on the data, the individual measure of the Alzheimer’s-typical loss of brain substance could be measured. By comparing the various participants, it was possible to show that the treatment of periodontitis reduced the loss of brain matter.

Remarkable results

“These results are remarkable insofar as the periodontitis patients were younger than 60 years at the time of the MRI examination and the observation time between the dental treatment and the MRI examination averaged 7.3 years for the patients”, summarize the co-authors of the study Professor Thomas Kocher and Professor Hans J. Grabe.

Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease through periodontal disease treatment

“Our approach is clearly in the prevention and timely treatment of gum disease, which can be triggered by a large number of germs, in order to prevent such possible consequential damage in advance,” emphasizes Kocher.

According to the researchers, another approach is currently being tested in an American research project. The key germ of periodontitis that has migrated into the brain is fought with medication. “In this area, too, we will have to rely on observational studies that simulate a controlled clinical study in the future,” emphasizes Dr. Christian Schwahn. A clinical study with a placebo treatment is not feasible in this area for ethical and medical reasons. (vb)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Diploma-Editor (FH) Volker Blasek

Swell:

  • University of Greifswald: Greifswald study confirms: gum recession increases the risk of dementia – prevention and timely treatment of periodontitis important (published: 04.06.2021), uni-egoswald.de
  • Christian Schwahn, Stefan Frenzel, Birte Holtfreter, et al.: Effect of periodontal treatment on preclinical Alzheimer’s disease-Results of a trial emulation approach; in: Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 2021, alz-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Periodontitis increases the risk of dementia – healing practice

Relationship between gum disease and dementia

Periodontitis is not only one of the most common chronic diseases of the oral cavity, but also a risk factor for Alzheimer’s, as a German research team confirms in a recent study. Treating the receding gums early and consistently could lower the risk of dementia.

Researchers at the University of Greifswald discovered a connection between periodontitis and dementia as part of a current study. Those who have chronic gum disease also appear to be at greater risk of developing dementia than those who do not have periodontal disease. The research results were recently presented in the journal “Alzheimer’s & Dementia”.

Common disease periodontitis

Periodontitis, a permanent inflammation of the teeth supporting system, is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. In Germany alone, over 11 million people suffer from a severe form of periodontitis. After tooth decay, periodontitis is the second most common oral disease.

Consequences of periodontal disease

Untreated periodontal disease can lead to tooth loss and have an impact on overall health. Since the disease is largely painless, it is often recognized and treated late. The researchers compare periodontitis to an iceberg – most of the effects take place in the dark.

Dental disease affects overall health

The influence of dental diseases on general health has been researched for decades. Inflammatory gum disease, from which between 15 and 45 percent of all people in this country suffer, depending on the age group, has already been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Now the researchers at the University Medical Center Greifswald have confirmed the suspected connection between Alzheimer’s and periodontitis.

Advanced statistics made it possible to prove it

“It is very difficult to conduct methodologically meaningful studies on the effects of periodontal disease, a common severe form of gum disease,” reports Dr. Christian Schwahn from the Polyclinic for Dental Prosthetics, Geriatric Dentistry and Medical Materials Science. Only recently developed statistical models would have made such evidence possible.

Moderate to strong association

“For the first time, the connection between the treatment of gum disease and the onset of Alzheimer’s disease was found in a quasi-experimental model of 177 patients treated periodontally in the Greifswald GANI-MED study (Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine) and 409 untreated participants from the SHIP study can be analyzed, ”explains the dentist. Overall, the association between Alzheimer’s and periodontal disease was rated as moderate to strong.

Periodontal disease treatment slowed loss of brain matter

MRT data from the participants served as an indicator of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. Based on the data, the individual measure of the Alzheimer’s-typical loss of brain substance could be measured. By comparing the various participants, it was possible to show that the treatment of periodontitis reduced the loss of brain matter.

Remarkable results

“These results are remarkable insofar as the periodontitis patients were younger than 60 years at the time of the MRI examination and the observation time between the dental treatment and the MRI examination averaged 7.3 years for the patients”, summarize the co-authors of the study Professor Thomas Kocher and Professor Hans J. Grabe.

Prevention of Alzheimer’s disease through periodontal disease treatment

“Our approach is clearly in the prevention and timely treatment of gum disease, which can be triggered by a large number of germs, in order to prevent such possible consequential damage in advance,” emphasizes Kocher.

According to the researchers, another approach is currently being tested in an American research project. The key germ of periodontitis that has migrated into the brain is fought with medication. “In this area, too, we will have to rely on observational studies that simulate a controlled clinical study in the future,” emphasizes Dr. Christian Schwahn. A clinical study with a placebo treatment is not feasible in this area for ethical and medical reasons. (vb)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Diploma-Editor (FH) Volker Blasek

Swell:

  • University of Greifswald: Greifswald study confirms: gum recession increases the risk of dementia – prevention and timely treatment of periodontitis important (published: 04.06.2021), uni-egoswald.de
  • Christian Schwahn, Stefan Frenzel, Birte Holtfreter, et al.: Effect of periodontal treatment on preclinical Alzheimer’s disease-Results of a trial emulation approach; in: Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 2021, alz-journals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Reveal …

Overt # emotional #mystory #mystoryisntover #foryou #foryoupage #dental #lifestyle #savedmylife #thereveal #theeth #smileagaindental #texas

@brittanynegler

The reveal #emotional #mystory #mystoryisntover #foryou #foryoupage #dental #lifestyle #savedmylife #thereveal #teeth #smileagaindental #texas

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