Christian Drosten thinks circuit breakers are possible

Christian Drosten

The virologist brings temporary lockdowns into play.

(Photo: dpa)

Düsseldorf Despite the exponential growth in the number of cases in Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel wants to prevent a nationwide lockdown as far as possible. “We cannot afford a second wave economically either,” said the CDU politician after the meeting with the prime ministers of the federal states last week.

SPD health expert Karl Lauterbach and virologist Christian Drosten are now bringing short and time-limited shutdowns into play, also known as “circuit breakers”, in order to slow the spread of the corona virus and thus keep the economic consequences within limits.

While this measure is still being discussed in Germany and England, Wales has already decided: There will be a two-week lockdown there from Friday. “Everyone in Wales will be required to stay at home,” said Mark Drakeford, Prime Minister of the British part of the country, to journalists on Monday.

Only employees of absolutely necessary facilities are exempt from the curfew. Most shops would also have to close. Such a hard and profound lockdown was necessary to get the rising number of infections under control, said Drakeford.

Drosten wrote on Twitter on Sunday that a circuit breaker was an option in the autumn and Christmas holidays. This could possibly limit the economic impact. The virologist from the Berlin Charité referred in his tweet to a British study. In it, the authors describe the positive effects of short shutdowns, which are directly communicated to the population as temporary.

Lauterbach also commented on the measure in the short message service: The study is also of interest to Germany, “because systematic short shutdowns could interrupt exponential growth while minimizing economic and school costs”.

According to Lauterbach, planned interruptions also increase the acceptance of the measure among the population.

The SPD politician sees an urgent need for action: If the corona virus continues to spread rapidly in Germany, Lauterbach expects shutdowns. “It’s very simple. The R value is around 1.3. If we don’t get it down, the daily number of cases will rise so quickly within a very short time that the clinics and health authorities will be overrun. Then there will be local shutdowns, “the doctor told the newspapers of the Funke media group.

The reproductive number, also known as the “R value”, indicates how many other people an infected person will infect.

According to the situation report from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) on Sunday, the seven-day R value in Germany is 1.35. On Monday, the RKI reported 4,325 new cases in Germany. The number is comparatively low compared to the previous days, since not all health authorities transmit data to the RKI at the weekend.

Compared to last Monday, on which the RKI announced 2467 new infections, the significant increase in the number of cases in the Federal Republic is evident.

More: Follow the current developments in the corona crisis in our news blog

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More and more retirees continue to work

Older workers

Compared to 2005, 547,000 or 73 percent more pensioners are in employment.

(Photo: dpa)

Berlin The number of retirees in gainful employment continues to rise. In 2019, according to statistics from the Federal Employment Agency, around 1.29 million people who had reached the standard retirement age were still gainfully employed.

That was around 400,000 or 45 percent more than in 2010, according to a response from the Federal Government to a request from the AfD that the German Press Agency has received. Compared to 2005 there were even 547,000 or 73 percent more pensioners who are gainfully employed.

According to this information, the total number of retirees rose by 3.9 percent to around 17.11 million between 2010 and 2019. Eight out of ten employed pensioners – 1.02 million or 79.2 percent – were only marginally employed last year, according to calculations by AfD labor market politician René Springer.

Every fifth working pensioner – 268,000 or 20.8 percent – was employed subject to social security contributions. This number has risen continuously in recent years, from 11.9 percent in 2005 to 20.8 percent in 2019.

This shows that the proportion of women and pensioners from the new federal states who went to work at an old age has increased particularly, explained the Brandenburg member of the Bundestag. The proportion of women of retirement age had risen by 170,577 or 42.4 percent in the last ten years to 2019. And the proportion of employed East Germans in old age increased by 77,332 or 61.5 percent, the proportion of employed West Germans by 324,110 or 42.3 percent.

In its answer, the Federal Government argues, “Contrary to what is often assumed, gainful employment in retirement age is not an indication of poverty in old age.” It refers to a study by the Federal Institute for Population Research: called intangible aspects. This includes, for example, having fun at work, being in contact with other people or the feeling of being needed. “

Springer did not want to leave it like that: “I rather fear that many retirees will have to take a job in order to avert poverty in old age and social benefits.”

More: Kassensturz for retirement: What needs to be clarified financially before retirement

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Deaf from Corona: more and more long-term consequences known – Coronavirus

Loss of smell and taste, chronic exhaustion, heart and brain damage: A new episode of the coronavirus is now known.

It remains to be seen whether he will ever be able to hear again: In the specialist journal “British Medical Journal”, doctors report on a man who lost his hearing in the course of his illness with the novel Sars-CoV-2 coronavirus.

After the 45-year-old suffered from Covid-19 symptoms for ten days, he was admitted to the hospital, where he was immediately admitted to the intensive care unit and was intubated for 30 days. At the same time he received remdesivir, steroids and numerous other drugs.

In addition, his blood plasma had to be replaced. Treatment was made more difficult by the sudden occurrence of pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary hypertension), anemia and pneumonia caused by ventilation.

Not an isolated case

The treatment worked and the patient could soon be transferred to a normal ward. But then he noticed left-sided tinnitus, then sudden hearing loss. The doctors checked his ear – but they could not find any blockages or inflammation.

He was treated with steroid pills and injections, after which his hearing partially recovered, but not completely, the medics said.

The differences between flu and corona infectionpicturedesk.com

“This is the first reported case of sensorineural hearing loss after Covid-19 infection in the UK,” the researchers note. However, it is not the first in the world, as Kevin J. Munro from the Manchester Center for Audiology and Deafness reported in July 2020 in the “International Journal of Audiology”. Accordingly, hearing impairment occurs in 13.2 percent of former Covid 19 patients.

According to the study, which included the data from 138 ex-corona patients between 44 and 82 years of age, men in particular have to struggle with tinnitus or hearing loss after their supposed recovery.

Does not depend on the severity of the course

The case of the American Meredith Harrell shows, among other things, that women are not immune to these long-term consequences and that even symptom-free Covid-19 courses can lead to it. The Sars-CoV-2 infection was only detected in her because the doctors were looking for the cause of the sudden ringing in the ear.

“It was like flicking a switch,” CNN.com quoted Harrell, whose hearing has not yet been restored. “I hope people finally understand that Corona is not a joke.”

Worse than other viruses

Even in their case, doctors cannot say with certainty that the virus is affecting the inner ear because there is a risk of tissue damage when performing a biopsy of the inner ear. But studies of people who have died as a result of a Covid 19 infection speak for themselves.

The virus could be detected in two of the three corpses in the middle ear and the mastoid bones in the skull, which is located directly behind the ear. The study was published in the journal “Jama Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery”.

Matthew Stewart of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, who performed the autopsy, told CNN that viruses like measles, mumps, and meningitis are known to cause sudden hearing loss. “But I think Sars-CoV-2 has the potential to be worse.” We all know that it triggers blood clots in other areas of the body and is obviously no exception to the “extremely small blood vessels” in the inner ear.

Kevin Munro agrees: “The capillaries in the inner ear are the smallest in the human body, so it doesn’t take much to block them.”

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That’s how long Covid-19 survives on the skin

According to a new study, the coronavirus can survive on human skin five times as long as the flu virus. On the other hand, it can also be killed in just 15 seconds.

According to a study by Japanese researchers, the novel coronavirus can survive on human skin five times as long as the flu virus. According to the study published in the journal “Clinical Infectious Diseases”, the SARS-CoV-2 virus remains active for up to nine hours, while the influenza A virus that causes influenza only survives 1.8 hours.

Ethanol kills the virus within 15 seconds

The risk of infection can be reduced by regular and thorough hand washing, as recommended by the World Health Organization, the researchers write. Both the coronavirus and the flu virus could also be killed within 15 seconds by ethanol, such as that contained in hand disinfectants.

Since the coronavirus first appeared in China last December, almost 40 million people worldwide have been infected with the pathogen.

Important NOTE: Under no circumstances does the information replace professional advice or treatment by trained and recognized doctors. The content of t-online cannot and must not be used to independently make diagnoses or start treatments.

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Engineers 1.8 million years ago | Science

The use of materials from the environment as tools is not exclusive to man. Many species are able to use available items. The ancient throne of this practice by hominids now stands at 2.58 million years in a desert area in southern Ethiopia known as Bokol Dora, where some 300 small and sharp tools have been found, according to an international team. of paleoanthropologists in the magazine Proceedings from the US National Academy of Sciences But there is a substantial evolutionary leap: the selection of materials, not necessarily from the closest environment, for their hardness, load potential and useful life to make specific tools more efficient. The proof of this practice 1.8 million years ago has been demonstrated in an excavation in the Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania), cradle of the first human culture and where the first pages of the genesis of engineering were written if it is considered as the set of knowledge oriented to the invention and use of techniques for the use of natural resources.

The find, published by Journal of Royal Society Interface, has been carried out by a team from the University of Kent, the UCL Institute of Archeology (both institutions in the United Kingdom) and Professor Ignacio de la Torre, from the Center for Human and Social Sciences of the CSIC, who is now in Tanzania completing the investigation.

The earliest human culture, the Olduvayense (named after the Olduvai Gorge of Tanzania), is characterized by the use of carved edges. The research led by Alastair Key, has shown that the hominids of this area took a fundamental step in evolution by discarding the lavas, quartzites or cherts (sedimentary rock) available and suitable to produce stone tools to opt for other materials more suitable to the function they were looking for.

“What we have been able to show is that our ancestors were making quite complex decisions about which raw materials to use and they were doing it in a way that produced tools optimized for specific circumstances. Although we knew that later hominin species, including our own, were capable of making such decisions, it is amazing to think that populations from 1.8 to 1.2 million years ago were also doing so, ”Key explains.

Stone tools made 1.8 million years ago.



enlarge photo

Stone tools made 1.8 million years ago.

The research has quantified the force, work and deformation applied to the materials in each type of stone to choose those that gave the best performance. In this way, Paleolithic hominids selected the most suitable raw materials to build different stone tools based on information about their edge, durability and efficiency based on how long they were going to be used and the force that was necessary to apply. This reveals a complexity in the design and production of the tool during the early Stone Age.

De la Torre, from the Department of Archeology and Social Processes of the CSIC, which he has joined from the Institute of Archeology at University College London, and who has obtained an ERC-Advanced Grant, explains from Tanzania that the importance of the study that is doing it is not so much the demonstration of the selection of raw materials, which has been documented in older sites, but in “finding out why they chose a particular type of stone in a preferential way”. “According to our results, Homo he understood the concepts of durability of the cutting edges of the rocks and the degree of sharpening, and he combined these concepts in the preferential selection of some rocks over others to make his lithic instruments ”, he comments.

In this regard, previous research had shown that early Stone Age populations in Kenya selected highly durable stone types for tools, but the new study reveals a level of complexity and flexibility in stone tool production that was unprecedented. “By selecting the material that was best suited to specific functional needs, hominins optimized the performance of their tools and ensured maximum efficiency and ease of use,” the study concludes.

“This demonstration helps to better understand the decisions involved in the selection of raw materials, which is already a research question that is not usually addressed systematically by archaeologists, and provides a better understanding of technical decisions and capacity organization of human beings with brains much more archaic than ours ”, explains the Spanish researcher.

Ignacio de la Torre, Spanish archaeologist from the CSIC who has participated in the study of the Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania).


Ignacio de la Torre, Spanish archaeologist from the CSIC who has participated in the study of the Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania).

Among the objects analyzed are flakes, which De la Torre describes as “stone knives with sharp edges that were used to cut meat or any other element they needed in their subsistence activities (tendons, wood, roots, etc.)”, and “Crushers and anvils, which the hominids would use to open the bones and acquire the marrow that they scavenged from the prey of large carnivores.”

This research on the subsistence strategies of the first human beings is the objective of the new excavation in a series of sites in Olduvai, a project led by the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), and which has researchers from University College London (UK), Indiana University (USA) and the Spanish UAB and CENIEH.

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Private real estate investors face competition

Restored houses

The reason for the continued price increase is the low supply. Some experts therefore warn of price bubbles.

(Foto: E+/Getty Images)

Frankfurt Investors looking for a rental house these days have little to smile about: the right property is difficult to find, and the price for the property is rising and rising.

Not even the corona crisis will stop it – on the contrary: Covid-19 had no negative impact on the housing markets, says Felix von Saucken, the manager responsible for the asset class at the real estate consultancy Colliers International. “On the contrary: investors are even more interested in investing in residential real estate.”

This no longer only applies to wealthy private customers who have always liked to buy so-called apartment buildings, but also to institutional investors such as insurers, pension funds or fund companies.

Since March, Colliers has been asking real estate investors who manage at least 500 billion euros in assets over the phone about their investment preferences. Accordingly, more and more are flirting with the purchase of residential property: While around 40 percent of the investors surveyed were interested in this usage class in the time before Covid-19, it is now 47 percent.

Less return, but more security

“Residential real estate is becoming increasingly important as an addition to a fund,” says von Saucken. A few years ago, many would have expected more returns from other asset classes without great expense – albeit at a higher risk.

“I may still be able to rent out a house built in 1950, even if it is no longer the most beautiful,” explains von Saucken. “An office property from the same year is more difficult to sell.”

However, the management of residential properties is more complex because, for example, not just one tenant has to be looked after, as is the case with an office property, but several. “Ultimately, however, income from residential property is more stable,” he explains. In phases in which prices in the market are generally rising, this aspect may not be the focus of investor interest. “When times become uncertain, that is exactly what is needed.”

Smaller cities in view

The real estate expert is convinced that the prices for residential property will continue to rise. In a report that is exclusively available to the Handelsblatt, Colliers International has analyzed and assessed developments in 42 German cities.

“There was no city where we are really skeptical,” says von Saucken now. “Although we do not expect the price jumps as large as in the past five years, we do expect a continuous, moderate increase in both purchase prices and rents.”

In 2019, 9,230 residential and commercial buildings with a transaction volume of 20.6 billion euros were sold in the cities examined – after 19.8 billion euros in the previous year, this corresponds to an increase of 4.1 percent compared to 2018. The cities of Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne and Frankfurt alone accounted for 11.3 billion euros – more than half. As in the previous year, Berlin had by far the highest turnover with 4.8 billion euros.

You can read more on the topic exclusively in Handelsblatt Inside Real Estate, the specialist briefing on the future of the real estate industry. Sign up here.

The cities of Aachen (plus 132 percent to 414.6 million euros), Fürth (plus 79 percent to 119.2 million euros) and Munich (plus 77 percent to 1.9 billion euros) recorded the strongest increase in sales volume From Collier’s point of view, this is a clear indication that secondary locations such as Aachen and Fürth are becoming increasingly attractive for investments due to the more attractive returns and greater development potential and are becoming the focus of investors.

Other locations apart from the seven major cities with significant growth in investment volume compared to the previous year were Offenbach (fourth place), Mainz (fifth), Wiesbaden (sixth) and Darmstadt (seventh), especially in the Rhine-Main area.

Too little new building

The reason for the continued price increase is the low supply. Even if a stroll through many German cities currently gives the impression that construction is going on everywhere: in 2019, around 293,000 apartments were completed, two percent more than in the previous year. However, around 400,000 apartments are needed annually to meet demand. A fact that many in the real estate industry criticize.

But according to the experts, a significant increase in the number of new buildings is also unlikely in the coming years, even if almost four percent more building permits were issued in 2019 than in the previous year. “You just have to look at how much is being built – and then how many people are moving to the cities,” says von Saucken. For Germany as a whole, experts forecast an increase in households by 2.8 percent by 2035. “The demand for living space will continue to be high, especially in the cities,” concludes Colliers.

Some experts therefore warn of price bubbles. The investment bank UBS recently published a study in which it saw clear signs of overheating in Munich and Frankfurt. “No other city in the world is as exposed to the risk of a real estate bubble as Munich and Frankfurt,” explained Maximilian Kunkel, UBS chief investment strategist in Germany.

25 metropolises around the world were considered for the analysis. For their “Global Real Estate Bubble Index 2020”, the experts calculated index values ​​of 2.4 and 2.3 for Munich and Frankfurt – at more than 1.5 points, the experts recognize the risk of a price bubble.

This puts them ahead of world cities like Paris and London. With the economic boom and a doubling of housing prices in a decade, Frankfurt is a “victim of its own success”. The corona crisis is now becoming the litmus test of whether the high prices are justified. In Munich, the strong local economy and solid population growth continued to fuel the real estate markets, while too little new living space was being created.

Bubble – or not?

Colliers manager von Saucken does not see the risk of price bubbles forming. Conversely, however, there are practically no more properties at prices below the market level. What looks like a bargain usually has a catch – such as poor transport links. “Then the question is: Do you want that?”

Colliers is not alone in his optimistic assessment of the German market. “Living is the winner of the corona crisis”, says Peter Schürrer, who as managing director of the Deutsche Anlage-Immobilien Verbund (Dave) represents twelve real estate consulting companies. “It has just become clear how important your own four walls are, whether owned or rented.”

More: Attractive cities, best location: Where residential real estate is worthwhile despite Corona.

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Diet: Children have been eating more sweets since the beginning of the pandemic


Munich –

Chocolate, ice cream and chips: Since the beginning of the corona pandemic, children in Germany have been eating more sweets and salty snacks and in some cases have been moving less. This is the result of a survey that nutrition researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) presented on Friday.

According to the study, the Covid-19 pandemic increases the risk of obesity and malnutrition in children. The nutrition researchers at the Else Kröner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine (EKFZ) at Munich University and the opinion research company Forsa surveyed around a thousand parents of children up to 14 years of age. According to this, 38 percent of parents state that their child has been less active since the beginning of the pandemic.

Lack of exercise and poor nutrition

This is particularly common among ten to 14 year olds – around half in this age group (57 percent) move noticeably less. On the other hand, the older children in particular have been eating more fruit and vegetables and less meat and sausage since the lockdown. But they also use sweets like chocolate, gummy bears and ice cream as well as chips and pretzel sticks more often. Boys in particular consume snacks (20 percent), sweets (22 percent) and soft drinks (twelve percent) more often than before the pandemic.

Among the different age groups, it was mainly the ten to twelve year old children who were less able to resist sweet (23 percent) or salty (28 percent) during the lockdown. This has some consequences for the weight. According to their parents, nine percent of children gained weight during the Corona crisis.

Corona kilos: Every sixth child is overweight

According to the study, weight gain can be observed particularly in children aged ten to twelve, with boys being affected twice as often as girls (14 percent) at 27 percent. For comparison: more than a quarter of the parents themselves say that they have put on pounds due to corona.

If there is a gap in calorie intake and consumption over the long term, “this can lead to obesity”, explained the Munich nutrition researcher Hans Hauner. He pointed out that in Germany at least every sixth child is overweight. As the study also shows, a total of 14 percent of families say they have been eating healthier than before since the beginning of the pandemic.

Seven percent eat less healthily, and 79 percent have no change. According to the study, these trends are largely independent of income and level of education. Almost every third family cooks for the children more often than before the crisis. This is especially true for parents who have worked in the home office.

Two thirds of parents cook no differently than they did before the pandemic, and only three percent cook less. Comparatively little has changed in the use of delivery services. Only eight percent of families have meals delivered more often, while eleven percent use the service less often. Nothing has changed for 81 percent. (afp)

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Diet: Children have been eating more sweets since the pandemic began


Munich –

Chocolate, ice cream and chips: since the beginning of the corona pandemic, children in Germany have been eating more sweets and salty snacks and in some cases have been moving less. This is the result of a survey that nutrition researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) presented on Friday.

According to the study, the Covid-19 pandemic increases the risk of obesity and malnutrition in children. The nutrition researchers at the Else Kröner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine (EKFZ) at Munich University and the opinion research company Forsa surveyed around a thousand parents of children up to 14 years of age. 38 percent of parents say that their child has been less active since the beginning of the pandemic.

Lack of exercise and poor nutrition

This is particularly common among ten to 14 year olds – around half in this age group (57 percent) move noticeably less. On the other hand, the older children in particular have been eating more fruit and vegetables and less meat and sausage since the lockdown. But they also eat sweets like chocolate, gummy bears and ice cream more often, as well as chips and pretzel sticks. Boys in particular consume snacks (20 percent), sweets (22 percent) and soft drinks (twelve percent) more often than before the pandemic.

Among the different age groups, it was mainly the ten to twelve year old children who were less able to resist sweet (23 percent) or salty (28 percent) during the lockdown. This has some consequences for the weight. According to their parents, nine percent of children gained weight during the Corona crisis.

Corona kilos: Every sixth child is overweight

According to the study, weight gain can be observed particularly in children aged ten to twelve, with boys being affected twice as often as girls (14 percent) at 27 percent. For comparison: more than a quarter of the parents themselves say that they have put on pounds due to the corona.

If calorie intake and consumption diverge in the long term, “this can lead to obesity,” explained the Munich nutrition researcher Hans Hauner. He pointed out that in Germany at least every sixth child is overweight. As the study also shows, a total of 14 percent of families say they have been eating healthier than before since the beginning of the pandemic.

Seven percent eat less healthily, and 79 percent have no change. According to the study, these trends are largely independent of income and level of education. Almost every third family cooks for the children more often than before the crisis. This is especially true for parents who have worked in the home office.

Two thirds of parents cook no differently than they did before the pandemic, and only three percent cook less. Comparatively little has changed in the use of delivery services. Only eight percent of families have meals delivered more often, while eleven percent use the service less often. Nothing has changed for 81 percent. (afp)

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Diet: Children have been eating more sweets since the beginning of the pandemic


Munich –

Chocolate, ice cream and chips: Since the beginning of the corona pandemic, children in Germany have been eating more sweets and salty snacks and in some cases have been moving less. This is the result of a survey that nutrition researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) presented on Friday.

According to the study, the Covid-19 pandemic increases the risk of obesity and malnutrition in children. The nutrition researchers at the Else Kröner Fresenius Center for Nutritional Medicine (EKFZ) at Munich University and the opinion research company Forsa surveyed around a thousand parents of children up to 14 years of age. According to this, 38 percent of parents state that their child has been less active since the beginning of the pandemic.

Lack of exercise and poor nutrition

This is particularly common among ten to 14 year olds – around half in this age group (57 percent) move noticeably less. On the other hand, the older children in particular have been eating more fruit and vegetables and less meat and sausage since the lockdown. But they also use sweets like chocolate, gummy bears and ice cream as well as chips and pretzel sticks more often. Boys in particular consume snacks (20 percent), sweets (22 percent) and soft drinks (twelve percent) more often than before the pandemic.

Among the different age groups, it was mainly the ten to twelve year old children who were less able to resist sweet (23 percent) or salty (28 percent) during the lockdown. This has some consequences for the weight. According to their parents, nine percent of children gained weight during the Corona crisis.

Corona kilos: Every sixth child is overweight

According to the study, weight gain can be observed particularly in children aged ten to twelve, with boys being affected twice as often as girls (14 percent) at 27 percent. For comparison: more than a quarter of the parents themselves say that they have put on pounds due to corona.

If there is a gap in calorie intake and consumption over the long term, “this can lead to obesity”, explained the Munich nutrition researcher Hans Hauner. He pointed out that in Germany at least every sixth child is overweight. As the study also shows, a total of 14 percent of families say they have been eating healthier than before since the beginning of the pandemic.

Seven percent eat less healthily, and 79 percent have no change. According to the study, these trends are largely independent of income and level of education. Almost every third family cooks for the children more often than before the crisis. This is especially true for parents who have worked in the home office.

Two thirds of parents cook no differently than they did before the pandemic, and only three percent cook less. Comparatively little has changed in the use of delivery services. Only eight percent of families have meals delivered more often, while eleven percent use the service less often. Nothing has changed for 81 percent. (afp)

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That is the reason for a severe corona course – health

Even completely healthy people without previous illnesses can have a strong coronavirus course. A study found a possible reason.

In the past few months it has been observed that young, healthy people without previous illnesses also get seriously ill with the coronavirus, while people from a risk group can have a mild course.

Researchers have now found a possible answer to this. The individual immune response should play an essential role in the severity of the disease.

Concentration of messenger substances in the blood

A research team led by Jérome Hadjadj from the University of Paris studied immune messenger substances such as interferons and regulating genes. Some messenger substances play an important role in combating viral and bacterial pathogens. They examined the gene activity and messenger substance concentrations in the blood in 50 coronavirus patients and 18 healthy people.

They discovered that patients with a severe course had inflammatory messenger substances in their blood. The production of the messenger substances was highly regulated. There was also a deficiency in the messenger substance interferon-alpha, which is important for virus defense.

“Based on our study, we suggest an IFN deficiency [Interferon-Mangel] Type I is an indicator of severe Covid-19, “the researchers conclude in their study.

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