Nuclear waste from England: Castor transport reaches Biblis

Dhe Castor train with nuclear waste from the British Sellafield facility has arrived in Biblis in southern Hesse. At 8:04 a.m. sharp he arrived at the train station with screeching brakes. Since 10 a.m. he has been at the destination, the site of the decommissioned nuclear power plant. In the early morning, the train with six secured nuclear waste containers was parked at the Hünfeld station. In Biblis, the castors are to be temporarily stored on the power plant site (see map below). About 40 protesters who opposed the transport had gathered there. A good half dozen were waiting for the train on a siding, which the train did not use.

The train was still in the station at around 9 a.m. Five demonstrators had sat down on the track bed and prevent him from continuing. Police initially tried to get them to leave the premises. The blockade ended around 9.10. The train started moving towards the power plant site. Most of the demonstrators were apparently 50 years or older. Officials from several federal states support the Hessian police. Equestrian teams at the entrance to the village included.

On Tuesday evening, the 600-meter-long train with six castors left the port of Nordenham in Lower Saxony at around 7.40 p.m. During the night he passed the state border with Hesse at around 12:50 a.m. The train is to roll into an interim storage facility at the decommissioned nuclear power plant in Biblis, Hesse.

“There were no disturbances”

Nuclear power opponents had announced protests along the possible routes to the south. According to their own statements, the federal police therefore secured several railway lines in Lower Saxony and Hesse, but also in Bremen and North Rhine-Westphalia. The route then led south without a detour via North Rhine-Westphalia.





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Arrival in Biblis

According to the police, the protests were peaceful. “There were no disruptions during the arrival of the ship, the loading phase and during the transport,” said the police in Oldenburg. Only three violations of the corona rules were found because mouth and nose protection was not worn. In addition, strangers in the Nordenham area had unauthorized rise a drone.

In the past, the Castor transports were often accompanied by large protests with blockades of the tracks. There is a lot of criticism of the transport of the dangerous material. Environmentalists see deficiencies in the Biblis interim storage facility and safety deficits in the Castor containers. The Society for Interim Storage (BGZ), which is responsible for the storage of highly radioactive nuclear waste, rejects these concerns.

The “Stop Castor” alliance announced rallies in Biblis in compliance with the Corona rules. Regardless of the train schedule, there should be a demonstration in the afternoon.

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For Germany it is the first major return transport of nuclear waste to Castoren in nine years. According to the federal government, Germany has to take back its nuclear waste processed abroad due to international obligations – from Sellafield as well as from the French plant La Hague.

There was also criticism of the transport in view of the corona epidemic and a possible risk to the police officers deployed. The police referred to a comprehensive hygiene concept, the health of everyone involved had the highest priority.

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Nuclear power opponents are waiting for Castor in Hessen (new-deutschland.de)

Nordenham. The transport of nuclear waste from the North Sea to Hesse is getting closer. It was still unclear until Tuesday afternoon whether it would roll through North Rhine-Westphalia. On Tuesday, the last two Castor containers were loaded from the ship onto the train in the port of Nordenham on the Weser. A spokesman for the transport company GNS said around noon. The train is to roll into an interim storage facility at the decommissioned Biblis nuclear power plant in Hesse. However, so far neither the GNS nor the police have given any information about when the transport should leave. Nuclear power opponents were on the spot in Nordenham on Tuesday. But you have also announced protests along the possible routes to the south. According to their own statements, the federal police therefore secured several railway lines in Lower Saxony and Hesse, but also in Bremen and North Rhine-Westphalia.

“We expect the train from Nordenham to Biblis to depart in the next few hours,” said a spokeswoman for the Castor-Stop Alliance in Nordenham of the German press agency. The protest is directed against what they say the federal government has failed to implement nuclear waste policy. The castors could not stay in the Biblis interim storage facility either, there is no final repository for radioactive waste yet.

The waste had been processed at the Sellafield nuclear facility in the UK. According to the federal government, Germany has to take back its nuclear waste processed abroad due to international obligations – from Sellafield as well as from the French plant La Hague. dpa / nd

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Nuclear waste ship on course to Nordenham: waiting for the castors

The “Pacific Grebe” with six nuclear waste containers was still on the high seas on Saturday morning. On land, environmentalists start their first protests.

A ship will come … with nuclear waste. In the port of Nordenham one prepares for arrival Photo: dpa

“Out of sight, out of mind! Where do we bring the nuclear waste ?? ”is written on a banner that opponents of nuclear power have put up in the port of Nordenham. “Castor alarm” is simply called on another. Activists have set up a vigil within sight of the jetty at which the nuclear waste ship “Pacific Grebe” will soon be moored.

The freighter with six castor casks on board started on Tuesday evening in the English port of Barrow-in-Furness. Because he has switched off his position recognition system AIS, the journey cannot be tracked from the outside. The AIS system is designed to protect against collisions between ships. Shutting down the system is incompatible with international maritime law, explains the “Stop Castor” alliance. There is therefore a complaint against the ship owner.

Activists of the alliance, who also accompany the load with a ticker, assumed on Saturday morning that the castors would arrive in Nordenham during the day. “They are still on the high seas,” said alliance spokeswoman Silke Westphal of the taz.

In Nordenham the containers are to be loaded onto railway wagons. The special train consisting of five diesel locomotives and about twelve wagons intended for the police and other accompanying persons had arrived in the Lower Saxony city on Friday night. The empty wagons onto which the Castors are to be reloaded had already been delivered separately on Thursday afternoon.

Castor train route is kept top secret

The nuclear waste containers, which contain highly radioactive residues melted in glass from the British reprocessing plant Sellafield, are then brought to the interim storage facility at the shutdown Biblis nuclear power plant in Hesse. Which route the Castor train takes there is kept strictly secret by the forwarding agent – the company for nuclear service – and the authorities.

Protest actions have already started in several places along the railway lines in question. A vigil began at midnight on the university campus in Oldenburg, where those interested can get the latest information. In Göttingen, the local anti-nuclear initiative had already set up an information stand in front of the train station on Friday afternoon. Loud music echoed across the square, and masked demonstrators dressed in white protective suits distributed leaflets to travelers. A rally was announced for Saturday afternoon in Nordenham, and there will also be protests in Bremen.

Until 2005, spent fissile elements from German nuclear power plants were brought to Sellafield and the French reprocessing factory La Hague. The Federal Republic is obliged to take back the nuclear waste. Opponents of nuclear power consider the transport to be nonsensical, since there is no repository in Germany. “Moving nuclear waste from one unsuitable location to another unsuitable location is not only unnecessary, regardless of declared pandemic situations, it is wrong,” says Silke Westphal. With a view to the worsening corona crisis, the police union GdP and Lower Saxony’s Interior Minister Boris Pistorius (SPD) have also criticized the fact that the Castors are now being launched.

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Nuclear waste in Germany: Castor ship is delayed (neue-deutschland.de)

Activists also protested against the Castor transport on the Weser in Nordenham at the weekend.

Photo: AFP / Patrik Stollarz

A defect on the high seas, a corona outbreak on the team or just police tactics? Yesterday, there was a lot of guesswork at the “Stopping Castor” alliance. The ship with six Castor containers on board, which was already expected for Saturday morning, had not yet reached the port of the small town of Nordenham in Lower Saxony by early Sunday afternoon. Here the castors, which were filled with highly radioactive scrap in the British reprocessing plant Sellafield and are to be temporarily stored in the interim storage facility at the shut down Biblis nuclear power plant in Hesse, are to be reloaded onto a train.

The nuclear freighter “Pacific Grebe” took off from the English port of Barrow-in-Furness on Tuesday evening. Because he has switched off his AIS position detection system, the journey cannot be tracked from outside. The AIS system is designed to protect against collisions between ships. Shutting down the system is incompatible with international maritime law, explains the “Stop Castor” alliance. There is therefore a complaint against the ship owner.

At a speed of 14 knots, which the operator calls, three days and eight hours of travel time would have been required for the ship transport. “The calculated arrival would have been around five o’clock on Saturday morning,” said the alliance. A train with five diesel locomotives, the special wagons and a loading crane have been in Nordenham for several days.

Regardless of the delays, opponents of nuclear power have started their announced protests against the cargo. Robin Wood demonstrated on Sunday morning with a sensational climbing action at Bremen Central Station. Five climbing activists from the environmental protection organization had reached the more than 30 meter high station roof via the back of the building. After a short battle against the north German gusts of wind, they hung a 15-meter-long banner with the words “No plan, just risk! Stop Castor «on the facade of the historic station building. A police spokesman said the officers would initially continue to monitor the action, but that later intervention could not be ruled out. The demonstrators on the roof would have to expect charges of trespassing.

Already early on Sunday morning, the “Stop Castor” alliance continued its protest actions in Nordenham. As on the previous day, demonstrators gathered in the early morning for a vigil at the port. Others were cruising across the Weser in a motorboat decorated with anti-nuclear flags. A vigil began on Friday at midnight on the university campus in Oldenburg, where interested parties could obtain current information. In Göttingen, the local anti-nuclear initiative had already set up an information stand in front of the train station on Friday afternoon. Loud music echoed across the square, and masked demonstrators dressed in white protective suits distributed leaflets to travelers.

The castors contain highly radioactive residues from reprocessing that have been melted into glass. Until 2005, spent fissile elements from German nuclear power plants were brought to Sellafield and the French reprocessing factory La Hague. The Federal Republic is obliged to take back the nuclear waste. Opponents of nuclear power consider transport nonsense as long as there is no repository in Germany.

Robin Wood spokeswoman Cécile Lecomte criticized in Bremen a “haphazard nuclear waste shifting operation that does not solve the nuclear waste problem, but exposes the environment and the population to considerable risk.” It is irresponsible to bring the nuclear waste to an unsafe interim storage facility in a dangerous transport and to move it to another location in a few years’ time. The police union GdP and Lower Saxony’s Interior Minister Boris Pistorius (SPD) had also turned against the Castor transport at the current time. The nuclear waste transport was originally planned for the spring. However, Federal Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU) canceled it with reference to the corona pandemic.

Three more shipments of highly radioactive fuel elements from France and England have been announced by 2024. In the next four years, a total of 25 castors will be brought back to Germany – 20 from Sellafield and five from La Hague, France. In addition to Biblis, the interim storage facilities at the nuclear power plants in Philippsburg (Baden-Württemberg), Ohu (Bavaria) and Brokdorf (Schleswig-Holstein) are used.

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Nuclear waste from one unsuitable place to the next (neue-deutschland.de)

Photo: Peter Steffen / dpa

For the first time since 2011, a train with highly radioactive nuclear waste will most likely roll through Germany again in the coming days. Waste from the British reprocessing plant Sellafield is brought to the interim storage facility at the decommissioned Biblis nuclear power plant in Hesse in six castor containers. The nuclear waste is supposed to land in the Weserhafen Nordenham in Lower Saxony this week and then be transported by rail via Bremen, Oldenburg, Hanover and Göttingen towards Biblis. Citizens’ initiatives want to protest with vigils and other actions against what they consider to be dangerous and senseless transport.

The castors have been filled in Sellafield in recent years, the extremely highly radiating waste consists of the recycled remains of spent fissure elements that were used in German power plants. Because there is no atomic reprocessing plant in the Federal Republic of Germany, the used elements used to be carted to Great Britain and France. According to the Federal Office for the Safety of Nuclear Waste Management, the collection of the waste is “legally binding”. However, such contracts have not yet become publicly known. In the next four years, a total of 25 castors will be brought back to Germany – 20 from Sellafield and five from La Hague in France. In addition to Biblis, the interim storage facilities at the nuclear power plants in Philippsburg (Baden-Württemberg), Ohu (Bavaria) and Brokdorf (Schleswig-Holstein) are used.

The spokesman for the anti-nuclear organization »Radiated«, Jochen Stay, says it is clear to him that the rubbish that originally came from German nuclear power plants must be returned to Germany. The question is when and how this should happen. “I think it is better not to transport until it is clear where it should ultimately be,” says Stay. “So it doesn’t have to be transported twice. Because that doubles the risk. “

Silke Westphal from AG Schacht Konrad thinks: “Moving nuclear waste from one unsuitable location to another unsuitable location is not only unnecessary, regardless of declared pandemic situations, it is wrong.” .

The spokeswoman for the Goettingen Anti-Nuclear Initiative, Annette Ramaswamy, stated: “We are resolutely against any nuclear waste shift as long as there is no suitable repository and the nuclear waste is merely taken to an interim storage facility.” The permits for the interim storage facilities are limited in time. therefore the population should be made aware of the “nonsensical” transports with the planned protest actions.

The Göttingen nuclear power opponents want to protest against the transport with vigils on three consecutive days. The anti-nuclear initiative will be present on October 30th and 31st and November 1st on the Göttingen station forecourt, said Ramaswamy. During this period, the Castor transport is expected to pass through Göttingen. Initiatives are also preparing actions in other places. There should be a demo on the day the ship arrives in Nordenham. Rallies have been announced in Bremen, Oldenburg and Biblis. The transport originally planned for the beginning of April was initially canceled on March 12 by Federal Interior Minister Horst Seehofer (CSU). Seehofer explained that the use of 6,000 federal police officers deployed to protect the transport was not responsible because of the spread of the corona virus.

With a view to the corona pandemic, Lower Saxony’s Interior Minister Boris Pistorius (SPD) considers the transport to be “not justifiable” at this point in time, as he wrote to his official colleague in the federal government a few days ago. The train with the Castors passed many districts and cities in which the corona incidence values ​​were exceeded. Pistorius pointed out that the deployment of a large number of police officers, despite a hygiene concept, would result in an “increased risk of infection for the emergency services.” But the federal government apparently wants to hold on to the transport. In a letter from the Federal Environment Ministry, from which the NDR quoted, it says: “The Federal Government is pursuing the goal of prompt, complete fulfillment of the obligation to return radioactive waste from the reprocessing of German fuel elements.” The fact that the Castor transport was postponed in the spring was a precaution takes place because the pandemic situation was still unknown. But now health protection measures have been introduced.

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Gorleben repository project and the taz: 41 years are enough

The nuclear waste disposal project in Gorleben is history after more than four decades. The taz was always there. A review.

“There’s a crack in the shaft”: But that came later. Gorleben Trek 1979 Photo: image

BERLIN taz | The end of the Gorleben repository project, which was sealed at the beginning of the month, was no coincidence: the story of the exploration of the salt dome is also part of the taz story. The initiatives and writers who published ten preliminary issues from September 1978 and then from April 1979 “a daily radical left newspaper” wanted to create an “instrument of movement” in addition to a professional paper.

And at that time there were mostly anti-nuclear opponents on the move in West Germany, especially in the Lüchow-Dannenberg district in Lower Saxony. A huge nuclear waste disposal center consisting of a reprocessing plant (WAA), various interim storage facilities and treatment facilities as well as the same nuclear waste disposal facility was planned there near Gorleben on twelve square kilometers.

In the very first taz on September 22, 1978, the article “Gorleben – A report from the district” filled two pages. In the preliminary editions of the taz, which appeared weekly in March 1979, the protest march by farmers and opponents of nuclear power plants from the district town of Lüchow to the capital of Lower Saxony was the lead story three times. And the front page of the last Vorab-taz shared the nuclear power plant accident in Harrisburg, USA, in which the reactor core began to melt, and the 140,000 opponents of the nuclear power plant who demonstrated against the planned disposal center at the end of the Gorleben trek in Hanover.

When the then Lower Saxony Prime Minister Ernst Albrecht announced in the state parliament six weeks later that the construction of a WAA near Gorleben was politically unenforceable, the taz was rightly skeptical: “WAA postponed, not canceled”, was the headline. In fact, two and a half years later, the CDU politician suggested building a WAA 25 kilometers west of Gorleben. However, the nuclear power plant operators opted for Wackersdorf in the Upper Palatinate – only to fail there too.

“The shaft cracks”, was the headline of the taz in May 1987. Concrete had to be filled

At Gorleben, however, further interim storage facilities for high and low level radioactive nuclear waste and a repository in the salt dome should be built according to the will of the federal and state governments. The crystallization point of the resistance were now the drillings with which the salt dome was explored from the surface of the earth. In taz Journal No. 1 Ecology, which made the resistance in Wendland the main focus for the newspaper’s one-year anniversary, it was about the pros and cons of clogging the borehole. In June 1980, the taz published a 50-page documentation about the 33-day occupation of deep drilling site 1004 with a hut village that declared itself a “Republic of the Free Wendland”.

In 1983 there were more arson attacks on construction machinery from companies involved in the construction of the Gorleben interim storage facility near Lüchow-Dannenberg. The property damage totaled around 4 million Deutschmarks within a year. Under the title “With gasoline and incense sticks”, the taz published an interview with two anonymous opponents of the nuclear power plant, who described this procedure in detail during attacks.

In the same year, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, which was then responsible for the disposal of nuclear waste, presented a report on the exploration of the Gorleben salt dome through drilling. The way in which representatives of the German government put the scientists involved in the report under massive pressure can be read in the taz on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of the newspaper in 2009: high-ranking Bonn ministerial officials appeared unannounced for the final discussion on the report and demanded weakening changes, above all the deletion of the recommendation, to investigate a second repository site. The Gorleben investigative committee set up by the Bundestag in March 2010 was primarily based on this taz report.

Long known geological deficits

The geological deficits that caused the Gorleben salt dome to be sorted out in the current nationwide search for a repository had also been known since the early 1980s. The safety criteria for a nuclear waste repository that came into force in 1982 provided for a multi-barrier concept against the escape of radioactive substances. The overburden above the camp should act as one of these barriers. However, even the drilling for the above-ground exploration of the salt dome showed that there is no closed overburden above the salt. Ice age glaciers once shaved it off on around six square kilometers. Instead, there are layers of rubble and sand through which water flows. Melt waters have dug a channel that in places extends more than 170 meters into the salt dome.

Nevertheless, preparations for the construction of the Gorleben exploration mine began in 1984. The areas for the mine shafts were cooled with chillers via a ring of boreholes down to the salt dome. But that threatened to fail quickly. “Gorleben: The shaft cracks”, was the headline of the taz in May 1987. Salt water flowing through the subsoil had prevented the shaft area from freezing. The wall of the shaft shifted. It had to be filled with concrete at a depth of over 200 meters. A support ring had already come loose from the deformed shaft wall, killed an upper climber and injured five other miners.

The work was not resumed until the beginning of 1989 – only to be interrupted again a year later due to unexpected lye inflows at the transition to the salt. During the construction of the infrastructure areas of the mine at a depth of a good 800 meters and the investigation of the first and, at the end, only emplacement area, brine was repeatedly found, especially in anhydrite, a waterless gypsum mineral.

According to the list of solutions that the operators had to keep, a total of 440 cubic meters of brine leaked out in eight places alone. The access points were usually locked again. The amount of liquid remaining in the stone is estimated in the official directory of solutions to be up to 12,800 cubic meters – that would correspond to the volume of 13 single-family houses.

The danger of drowning

The exploration of the salt dome was stopped for ten years with the nuclear consensus of 2000 and then resumed for a short time until November 2012, pending an agreement in principle on a new site selection process. The taz warned that a Gorleben repository could drown due to the caustic deposits in the anhydrite layers in the salt dome. In 2011, similar concerns were found in an expertise of the official “Preliminary Safety Analysis for the Gorleben Site”, which was ultimately canceled.

To ensure that the lye would not seep into the salt dome, the pressure under which the deposits were measured: Put simply, the pressure is much higher when they are tightly enclosed by rock than when they are connected to the groundwater. “The pressures listed here are far below the lithostatic pressure and, assuming a brine of high density, can even reflect hydrostatic pressures,” says the expertise of the Society for Reactor Safety. Specifically: “According to these findings, ‘seclusion’ does not exist.”

Erroneous selection criteria

In the end, the taz was also able to halfway solve the riddle surrounding the selection of Gorleben as the location for a nuclear waste disposal center. In January 2010, in addition to other papers, she was presented with the cabinet proposal, on the basis of which the Lower Saxony state government had decided in favor of Gorleben in February 1977. The documents showed that geology played virtually no role in the selection of the salt dome. Rather, the decisive factor was to find the 1,200 hectare area above a salt dome that was believed to be needed for the planned nuclear waste disposal center. But that was already obsolete in 1979, when only interim storage facilities and an exploratory mine were planned at Gorleben. Both found space on 50 hectares above ground. Now, after the end of the repository project, all that remains is the 15 hectare interim storage area known from the Castor transports.

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Japan wants to channel radioactive water from Fukushima into the sea (neue-deutschland.de)

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant destroyed after an earthquake and tsunami.

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant destroyed after an earthquake and tsunami.

Foto: Kyodo / dpa

Tokyo. According to media reports, the Japanese government wants to discharge more than a million tons of radioactive water into the sea. The water comes from the nuclear power plant in Fukushima that was destroyed in the 2011 disaster. The government will make the corresponding formal decision shortly, reported several Japanese media on Friday. The discharge of the contaminated water should therefore begin in the year after next at the earliest.

The water currently stored in around a thousand tanks is subjected to an extensive filtering process in order to reduce its radioactive content. In the end, according to the authorities, it should only contain tritium, which cannot be filtered out with the existing technologies.

According to experts, tritium is only harmful to humans in very high doses. The International Atomic Energy Agency argues that properly filtered water can be safely discharged into the ocean without causing environmental problems.

At the beginning of the year, a panel of experts proposed to the government that the radioactively contaminated water should be discharged into the sea. The experts summoned by the Ministry of Industry called this a safe method that would also be used with normal nuclear reactors. However, the plan is met with massive opposition from local fishermen and farmers. They fear that consumers could avoid products from the region.

The pressure on the government to find a solution to the contaminated water has increased as the capacity to store it will soon be exhausted. So far, the Akw operator Tepco has been pumping the contaminated water out of the system and storing it in tanks. The contaminated water comes from various sources. This includes water that is used to cool the system, as well as groundwater and rainwater that seeps into the system every day.

In Fukushima, after a severe earthquake and tsunami in March 2011, the worst nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl disaster of 1986 occurred. Because the cooling system failed, there was a core meltdown in three of the six reactors. Tepco and the government estimate that it will take them around 40 years to repair the damage.

It was the worst nuclear catastrophe since the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The situation in the Fukushima nuclear ruin is now considered stable. But the enormous amounts of contaminated water are increasingly becoming a problem. Agencies / nd

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Intervene instead of looking the other way (daily newspaper Junge Welt)

The mobile Opferberatung Together e. V. from Halle (Saale) announced on Thursday about an attack by a right-wing man in a tram:

On Friday at nine o’clock in the Halle district court, the trial of a right-wing politically motivated attack will open almost exactly a year ago. Only one week after the right-wing terrorist attack in Halle, three young women intervened when a 39-year-old man racially insulted three men on the street car because of the color of their skin and showed the Hitler salute on the evening of October 17. Two of the women themselves were offended and z. T. been seriously injured.

It is only thanks to the commitment of the injured women and their lawyers that the attack is even heard in court. The Halle public prosecutor’s office closed the investigation against the accused in February 2020 (…). Such an adjustment is possible, among other things, if the punishment to be expected is not significant alongside another one – here following an attempted manslaughter charge from December 2019. However, a guideline on the prosecution of politically motivated criminals by the Saxony-Anhalt Ministry of Justice states that “the effects of the offense on the victim and the public interest in prosecution (…) must be given special attention”. »From many years of experience we know how central the intervention of witnesses is for those affected by right-wing, racist and anti-Semitic attacks: not only in the situation itself, but also for processing what they have experienced. It is all the more important that courageous helpers who are affected by their intervention also find out from the judiciary that such acts are consistently pursued, ”said a spokeswoman for the mobile victim counseling service. After a complaint by the joint prosecutor’s representatives, the public prosecutor finally brought charges in May 2020 against the accused, who was known to the police and had multiple criminal records, of sedition, assault, insult and the use of symbols of unconstitutional organizations. (…)

Hubertus Zdebel, until 2016 member of the Bundestag commission »Storage of highly radioactive waste« and member of the Bundestag for Die Linke, criticized the cancellation of the face-to-face event planned in Kassel for the start of public participation in the search for a repository on Thursday:

The responsible federal authorities risk the failure of the new nuclear waste repository search before it has even started. The Federal Atomic Waste Authority only wants the public to be there from the video tube. Starting the public participation now exclusively as a video session despite all corona restrictions and other deficiencies is wrong. The search for a repository for such waste has not really made any headway for over 50 years. For decades, corporations and federal governments had hindered a sensible and appropriate search for a final repository with an arbitrary political commitment to Gorleben. Now, when the restart is overdue, citizens are supposed to foot the bill again and, under unacceptable conditions, simply listen to what the authorities announce via video and ask questions as a mere staging.

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Gorleben will “not repeat itself” – politics

The President of the German Waste Management Authority, Wolfram König, on the way to a nuclear waste repository and the reservations of the Bavarian government.

Interview by

Michael Bauchmüller, Berlin

In theory, 54 percent of the area of ​​the Federal Republic of Germany could be used as a nuclear waste repository – but not Gorleben. This was the result of the preliminary work by the Federal Agency for Final Storage (BGE). But this result could burden the further process, says Wolfram König, President of the Federal Office for the Safety of Nuclear Waste Management. His authority organizes the participation of citizens – for the first time in a virtual conference this weekend.

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690 million people worldwide are undernourished (daily newspaper Junge Welt)

Eva-Maria Schreiber, spokeswoman for world food policy of the parliamentary group of Die Linke, said on Monday on the occasion of the publication of the »Global Hunger Index 2020«:

Almost 690 million people are malnourished – that’s 690 million too many. The increasing wealth less on the one hand and the increase in poverty on the other hand is shameful. In addition, the current projections by Welthungerhilfe do not yet take into account the effects of the corona pandemic, which are already threatening to exacerbate hunger and malnutrition. Unfortunately, the Federal Government is far from enabling the goal of »No hunger by 2030« with its development cooperation. In addition, with the special initiative »A World Without Hunger«, into which 1.5 billion euros flow annually, it relies on short-term increases in production and cooperation with major players such as the Gates Foundation and Bayer. Instead, smallholders who are exploited in global supply chains must be actively included in the fight against hunger and the power of agricultural corporations limited. This is also what an alliance of 46 organizations such as Misereor, FIANE, Oxfam and Bread for the World calls for.

The alliance »Stop Castor «announced on Monday protests against the transport of nuclear waste from Sellafield to Biblis from November 1st to 4th an:

This transport with highly radioactive fuel elements, originally planned for the beginning of April, was “suspended with immediate effect” on March 12th by Federal Minister of the Interior Seehofer. The deployment of 6,000 federal police officers would “not be responsible” because of the spread of the corona virus at the time. Now the Castor transport is to be carried out in the period from October 26th, despite the currently far higher and increasing numbers of corona infections. until 04.11. be performed. First from October 26th as a ship transport from Sellafield to Nordenham near Bremerhaven. Then as rail transport in the time window from 01.11. until 04.11. from Nordenham to Biblis. The planned railway line runs via Bremen, Hanover, Göttingen, Fulda, Frankfurt, Darmstadt to the Biblis nuclear power plant in Hesse.

Again, nuclear waste is supposed to be moved from one place to another without a concept. For the first time since 2011, new castor transports have come from the plutonium factories in La Hague (F) and Sellafield (GB). The Castor interim storage facilities are and will become unsafe long-term storage facilities; there is no meaningful concept for long-term storage. Any unnecessary transport is an additional radioactive risk, which is why we reject these nuclear waste transfers. That is why the nationwide protest alliance »Stop Castor« was founded in 2019 against these unnecessary and senseless transports. The alliance consists of groups from the anti-nuclear movement and climate groups. We mobilize under the motto: nuclear phase-out immediately and further energy transition now – it is far from over! (…) It is simply irresponsible to drive the nuclear waste there, as long-term storage and repair cannot take place there. Carrying out the transport now in the middle of a pandemic is seen by the alliance as a further sign of the irresponsibility of the responsible authorities and ministries. We call for protest against it. Info points are the vigils in Nordenham, Bremen, Oldenburg, Hanover, Göttingen and Biblis.

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