A drug used in chemotherapy for cancer proves effective in treating symptoms of corona

Scientists of the Shenzhen Institute of Technology in China confirmed that the “chemotherapy” that was originally developed to treat cancer can be reused to prevent the reproduction of the Corona virus and treat Covid 19, as the chemotherapy drug proved its superiority over the famous remdesivir drug and that it was more able to prevent the reproduction of the virus, according to What the “Times of India” website reported.

In the study, scientists used laboratory experiments as well as techniques based on computer simulations that simulate the interactions of the Corona virus with various treatments, and by using this hybrid approach, scientists from Shenzhen Institutes of Technology examined 1906 existing drugs for their potential ability to prevent the reproduction of the coronavirus by targeting a viral protein called RNA Polymerase RNA Approved)RdRP).

Researchers identified four promising drugs, which were then tested against the Coronavirus in laboratory experiments.

They said that two drugs, namely pralatrexate And azithromycin , Succeeded in preventing the virus from replicating, and other laboratory experiments showed that pralatrexate Preventing the virus from multiplying more strongly than a drug Remdesivir It is a drug currently used to treat some Corona patients.

According to the scientists, the results indicate that pralatrexate may be reused to treat Corona symptoms.

pharma-afp

However, the researchers said that the chemotherapy drug may lead to significant side effects and is used for people with lymphoma, so they added that the immediate use of Corona patients is not guaranteed, but the research highlighted the importance of the new screening strategy to identify drugs that can be reused.

“We have shown the value of our new hybrid approach that combines deep learning techniques with more traditional simulations of virus particles,” said study author Haiping Zhang of Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology.

Researchers are now working to develop additional computational methods to generate new molecular structures that can be developed into new drugs to treat corona.

chemotherapy-drug-outperforms-remdesivir-against-coronavirus-in-lab-experiments--study-2021-01-03

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These five genes are associated with severe corona courses – healing practice

Genes hold the key to COVID-19 treatments

Researchers from Scotland have identified five genes associated with the most severe forms of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease COVID-19. The findings could be the key to new treatments.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have located five genes that can have negative effects on the course of COVID-19. The new findings could help to find out which drugs are suitable for therapy.

DNA from intensive care patients

The scientists examined the DNA of 2,244 corona patients in 208 intensive care units in Great Britain and compared these DNA sequences with the genome of thousands of control persons from the general population stored in a database.

According to a communication from the university, the research team found significant differences in five genes from intensive care patients compared to samples from healthy volunteers.

The genes – IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9, and CCR2 – explain in part why some people with COVID-19 get seriously ill while others have little or no symptoms.

Anti-inflammatory and antiviral

Since some genetic variants react similarly to certain drugs, the researchers were also able to predict the effects of drug treatments on patients.

For example, they showed that reducing the activity of the TYK2 gene protects against COVID-19. A class of anti-inflammatory drugs called JAK inhibitors, which contain the drug baricitinib, create this effect.

They also discovered that increasing the activity of the INFAR2 gene is likely to provide protection as well, as it could mimic the effects of treatment with interferon proteins, which are released by cells in the immune system to fight off viruses.

However, experts point out that patients may need treatment early if it is to work.

Based on the results published in the journal Nature, the researchers say clinical trials should focus on drugs that target these specific antiviral and anti-inflammatory pathways.

Which drugs should be tested

“As with sepsis and influenza, the damage to the lungs in Covid-19 is more caused by our own immune system than by the virus itself,” explains Dr. Kenneth Baillie from the University of Edinburgh. The study results “show the way to important drug targets,” says the scientist.

“Our results immediately show which drugs should be at the top of the list for clinical testing. We can only test a few drugs at the same time, so making the right decisions will save thousands of lives, ”said Dr. Baillie.

“Covid-19 is the greatest public health challenge in a century. Every day we learn more about this virus, ”says Lord Bethell, Minister for Innovation and a graduate of the University of Edinburgh.

“Research like this is a huge step forward in further improving our understanding of COVID-19 and protecting the most vulnerable – and ultimately saving lives around the world.”

And Dr. Jonathan Pearce of the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) added: “By identifying genes associated with severe COVID-19, even in young patients with no known underlying health problems, we can improve research into new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches accelerate. “(ad)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the requirements of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • University of Edinburgh: Genes could be key to new Covid-19 treatments, (Abruf: 14.12.2020), University of Edinburgh
  • Erola Pairo-Castineira, Sara Clohisey, Lucija Klaric, Andrew D. Bretherick, Konrad Rawlik, Dorota Pasko, Susan Walker, Nick Parkinson, Max Head Fourman, Clark D. Russell, James Furniss, Anne Richmond, Elvina Gountouna, Nicola Wrobel, David Harrison, Bo Wang, Yang Wu, Alison Meynert, Fiona Griffiths, Wilna Oosthuyzen, Athanasios Kousathanas, Loukas Moutsianas, Zhijian Yang, Ranran Zhai, Chenqing Zheng, Graeme Grimes, Rupert Beale, Jonathan Millar, Barbara Shih, Sean Keating, Marie Zechner, Chris Haley, David J. Porteous, Caroline Hayward, Jian Yang, Julian Knight, Charlotte Summers, Manu Shankar-Hari, Paul Klenerman, Lance Turtle, Antonia Ho, Shona C. Moore, Charles Hinds, Peter Horby, Alistair Nichol, David Maslove, Lowell Ling, Danny McAuley, Hugh Montgomery, Timothy Walsh, Alex Pereira, Alessandra Renieri, The GenOMICC Investigators, The ISARICC Investigators, The COVID-19 Human Genetics Initiative, 23andMe Investigators, BRACOVID Investigators, Gen-COVID Investigators, Xia Shen, Chris P. Ponting, Angie Fawkes, Albert Tenesa, Mark Caulfield, Richard Scott, Kathy Rowan, Lee Murphy, Peter J. M. Openshaw, Malcolm G. Semple, Andrew Law, Veronique Vitart, James F. Wilson & J. Kenneth Baillie: Genetic mechanisms of critical illness in Covid-19; in: Nature, (veröffentlicht: 11.12.2020), Nature

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

These five genes are the reason for severe corona courses – healing practice

Genes hold the key to COVID-19 treatments

Researchers from Scotland have identified five genes associated with the most severe forms of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease COVID-19. The findings could be the key to new treatments.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have located five genes that can have negative effects on the course of COVID-19. The new findings could help to find out which drugs are suitable for therapy.

DNA from intensive care patients

The scientists examined the DNA of 2,244 corona patients in 208 intensive care units in Great Britain and compared these DNA sequences with the genome of thousands of control persons from the general population stored in a database.

According to a communication from the university, the research team found significant differences in five genes from intensive care patients compared to samples from healthy volunteers.

The genes – IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9, and CCR2 – explain in part why some people with COVID-19 get seriously ill while others have little or no symptoms.

Anti-inflammatory and antiviral

Since some genetic variants react similarly to certain drugs, the researchers were also able to predict the effects of drug treatments on patients.

For example, they showed that reducing the activity of the TYK2 gene protects against COVID-19. A class of anti-inflammatory drugs called JAK inhibitors, which contain the drug baricitinib, create this effect.

They also discovered that increasing the activity of the INFAR2 gene is likely to provide protection as well, as it could mimic the effects of treatment with interferon proteins, which are released by cells in the immune system to fight off viruses.

However, experts point out that patients may need treatment early if it is to work.

Based on the results published in the journal Nature, the researchers say clinical trials should focus on drugs that target these specific antiviral and anti-inflammatory pathways.

Which drugs should be tested

“As with sepsis and influenza, the damage to the lungs in Covid-19 is more caused by our own immune system than by the virus itself,” explains Dr. Kenneth Baillie from the University of Edinburgh. The study results “show the way to important drug targets,” says the scientist.

“Our results immediately show which drugs should be at the top of the list for clinical testing. We can only test a few drugs at the same time, so making the right decisions will save thousands of lives, ”said Dr. Baillie.

“Covid-19 is the greatest public health challenge in a century. Every day we learn more about this virus, ”says Lord Bethell, Minister for Innovation and a graduate of the University of Edinburgh.

“Research like this is a huge step forward in further improving our understanding of COVID-19 and protecting the most vulnerable – and ultimately saving lives around the world.”

And Dr. Jonathan Pearce of the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) added: “By identifying genes associated with severe COVID-19, even in young patients with no known underlying health problems, we can improve research into new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches accelerate. “(ad)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the requirements of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • University of Edinburgh: Genes could be key to new Covid-19 treatments, (Abruf: 14.12.2020), University of Edinburgh
  • Erola Pairo-Castineira, Sara Clohisey, Lucija Klaric, Andrew D. Bretherick, Konrad Rawlik, Dorota Pasko, Susan Walker, Nick Parkinson, Max Head Fourman, Clark D. Russell, James Furniss, Anne Richmond, Elvina Gountouna, Nicola Wrobel, David Harrison, Bo Wang, Yang Wu, Alison Meynert, Fiona Griffiths, Wilna Oosthuyzen, Athanasios Kousathanas, Loukas Moutsianas, Zhijian Yang, Ranran Zhai, Chenqing Zheng, Graeme Grimes, Rupert Beale, Jonathan Millar, Barbara Shih, Sean Keating, Marie Zechner, Chris Haley, David J. Porteous, Caroline Hayward, Jian Yang, Julian Knight, Charlotte Summers, Manu Shankar-Hari, Paul Klenerman, Lance Turtle, Antonia Ho, Shona C. Moore, Charles Hinds, Peter Horby, Alistair Nichol, David Maslove, Lowell Ling, Danny McAuley, Hugh Montgomery, Timothy Walsh, Alex Pereira, Alessandra Renieri, The GenOMICC Investigators, The ISARICC Investigators, The COVID-19 Human Genetics Initiative, 23andMe Investigators, BRACOVID Investigators, Gen-COVID Investigators, Xia Shen, Chris P. Ponting, Angie Fawkes, Albert Tenesa, Mark Caulfield, Richard Scott, Kathy Rowan, Lee Murphy, Peter J. M. Openshaw, Malcolm G. Semple, Andrew Law, Veronique Vitart, James F. Wilson & J. Kenneth Baillie: Genetic mechanisms of critical illness in Covid-19; in: Nature, (veröffentlicht: 11.12.2020), Nature

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

These five genes responsible for severe corona courses – healing practice

Genes hold the key to COVID-19 treatments

Researchers from Scotland have identified five genes associated with the most severe forms of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus disease COVID-19. The findings could be the key to new treatments.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have located five genes that can have negative effects on the course of COVID-19. The new findings could help to find out which drugs are suitable for therapy.

DNA from intensive care patients

The scientists examined the DNA of 2,244 corona patients in 208 intensive care units in Great Britain and compared these DNA sequences with the genome of thousands of control persons from the general population stored in a database.

According to a communication from the university, the research team found significant differences in five genes from intensive care patients compared to samples from healthy volunteers.

The genes – IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9, and CCR2 – explain in part why some people with COVID-19 get seriously ill while others have little or no symptoms.

Anti-inflammatory and antiviral

Since some genetic variants react similarly to certain drugs, the researchers were also able to predict the effects of drug treatments on patients.

For example, they showed that reducing the activity of the TYK2 gene protects against COVID-19. A class of anti-inflammatory drugs called JAK inhibitors, which contain the drug baricitinib, create this effect.

They also discovered that increasing the activity of the INFAR2 gene is likely to provide protection as well, as it could mimic the effects of treatment with interferon proteins, which are released by cells in the immune system to fight off viruses.

However, experts point out that patients may need treatment early if it is to work.

Based on the results published in the journal Nature, the researchers say clinical trials should focus on drugs that target these specific antiviral and anti-inflammatory pathways.

Which drugs should be tested

“As with sepsis and influenza, the damage to the lungs in Covid-19 is more caused by our own immune system than by the virus itself,” explains Dr. Kenneth Baillie from the University of Edinburgh. The study results “show the way to important drug targets,” says the scientist.

“Our results immediately show which drugs should be at the top of the list for clinical testing. We can only test a few drugs at the same time, so making the right decisions will save thousands of lives, ”said Dr. Baillie.

“Covid-19 is the greatest public health challenge in a century. Every day we learn more about this virus, ”says Lord Bethell, Minister for Innovation and a graduate of the University of Edinburgh.

“Research like this is a huge step forward in further improving our understanding of COVID-19 and protecting the most vulnerable – and ultimately saving lives around the world.”

And Dr. Jonathan Pearce of the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) added: “By identifying genes associated with severe COVID-19, even in young patients with no known underlying health problems, we can improve research into new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches accelerate. “(ad)

Author and source information

This text corresponds to the requirements of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • University of Edinburgh: Genes could be key to new Covid-19 treatments, (Abruf: 14.12.2020), University of Edinburgh
  • Erola Pairo-Castineira, Sara Clohisey, Lucija Klaric, Andrew D. Bretherick, Konrad Rawlik, Dorota Pasko, Susan Walker, Nick Parkinson, Max Head Fourman, Clark D. Russell, James Furniss, Anne Richmond, Elvina Gountouna, Nicola Wrobel, David Harrison, Bo Wang, Yang Wu, Alison Meynert, Fiona Griffiths, Wilna Oosthuyzen, Athanasios Kousathanas, Loukas Moutsianas, Zhijian Yang, Ranran Zhai, Chenqing Zheng, Graeme Grimes, Rupert Beale, Jonathan Millar, Barbara Shih, Sean Keating, Marie Zechner, Chris Haley, David J. Porteous, Caroline Hayward, Jian Yang, Julian Knight, Charlotte Summers, Manu Shankar-Hari, Paul Klenerman, Lance Turtle, Antonia Ho, Shona C. Moore, Charles Hinds, Peter Horby, Alistair Nichol, David Maslove, Lowell Ling, Danny McAuley, Hugh Montgomery, Timothy Walsh, Alex Pereira, Alessandra Renieri, The GenOMICC Investigators, The ISARICC Investigators, The COVID-19 Human Genetics Initiative, 23andMe Investigators, BRACOVID Investigators, Gen-COVID Investigators, Xia Shen, Chris P. Ponting, Angie Fawkes, Albert Tenesa, Mark Caulfield, Richard Scott, Kathy Rowan, Lee Murphy, Peter J. M. Openshaw, Malcolm G. Semple, Andrew Law, Veronique Vitart, James F. Wilson & J. Kenneth Baillie: Genetic mechanisms of critical illness in Covid-19; in: Nature, (veröffentlicht: 11.12.2020), Nature

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Successes in animal experiments: new corona agent slows infections

Successes in animal experiments
New corona agent slows infections

From Kai Stoppel

The drug molnupiravir shows an astonishing effectiveness against Sars-CoV-2 in animal experiments: Infected ferrets are no longer contagious after just 24 hours. Researchers hope for a breakthrough in the fight against Covid-19. Clinical studies are already running.

The search for a really powerful drug against Covid-19 continues. Because although the first vaccines are already on the doorstep, the coronavirus is likely to circulate in the population well into the coming year, and possibly even beyond. The drug Remdesivir used so far shows little effect. And dexamethasone has proven to be helpful – but especially in patients who are already seriously ill. Researchers at the university in the US state of Georgia may have now found a means that quickly kills the Sars-CoV-2 virus immediately after an infection.

In animal experiments, the researchers rediscovered Richard Plemper that the new Antiviral drug MK-4482 / EIDD-2801 – also known as molnupiravir – completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, the university announced. The study was published in Trade journal “Nature MicrobiologyMolnupiravir was originally developed as an anti-flu drug. Its mechanism of action is the same as that of the drug Remdesivir, which is already used against Sars-CoV-2: it inhibits the replication of viruses by building mutations into their RNA.

Contain local outbreaks

In contrast to remdesivir, which is administered as an infusion, according to the researchers, molnupiravir has a major advantage: “This is the first evidence of an orally available drug that quickly blocks the transmission of Sars-CoV-2,” said Plemper. Molnupiravir can be used early for the treatment of corona infected people, which offers several advantages: For example, a severe course of Covid-19 could be prevented early. The duration of the infection may also be shortened – which is emotional and saims to reduce ozioeconomic stress for patients. Simultaneously could The researchers hope that local corona outbreaks will be quickly contained with the new agent.

Plemper and his colleagues had tested the active ingredient on ferrets related to mink, since the spread of Sars-CoV-2 among animals was very similar to that observed in young adults. In both cases, the virus spreads quickly, but severe Covid-19 cases are rare.

What the experiments with ferrets showed: infected animals that had been treated with molnupiravir did not infect any of their healthy cage mates. In contrast, in animals treated with placebo, all other animals in the cage became infected. The orally administered agent could “dramatically reduce” the transferability, according to Plemper. These properties would make molnupiravir a “strong candidate” for containing the Covid-19 pandemic. “The MK-4482 / EIDD-2801 could change the game,” believes Plemper.

There were security concerns

However, concerns had become known in May this year that the active ingredient could cause mutations in the offspring of animals, as the magazine “Science” reported. According to the testimony of a whistleblower, offspring of laboratory animals were born without teeth and without parts of their skulls after the use of similar drugs. According to the “Science” report, other researchers had also warned of possible dangers to the genome of offspring.

However, the developer of the active ingredient had rejected the allegations at the time: no change in the genetic material was observed in animal studies. And despite the safety concerns mentioned, several clinical studies with molnupiravir are already underway. The pharmaceutical company Merck, for example, is currently conducting a clinical study of the advanced phases 2/3 with more than 1000 test subjects. However, results are only expected for the coming year.

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Stopping Sars-CoV-2 in the body: is the pill against corona coming?

Experts are convinced that a vaccine is needed to get the corona pandemic under control. At the same time, they are calling for the search for a drug against Covid-19 to be continued. Results come from a laboratory on a promising active ingredient.

The great hope in the fight against the corona pandemic is currently in a corona vaccine. The pharmaceutical companies Biontech and Pfizer have approved their vaccine candidates in the EU. Nevertheless, research on Covid-19 drugs should continue to be intensively promoted, warns the Munich infectiologist Clemens Wendtner. Virologist Meike Dittmann from the New York University School of Medicine is currently investigating a promising active ingredient in her laboratory in Manhattan.

“Drug research is still important,” warns Wendtner. It takes time to achieve artificial herd immunity through vaccination. Until then, the patients have to be given medical care, says Wendtner. This is problematic, however, because so far there is hardly any drug that effectively combats Covid 19 disease. Cortisone preparations are currently used most frequently and most effectively, especially dexamethasone. This preparation plays a role in the late phase of the disease to prevent excessive inflammatory reactions caused by Covid-19.

“Promising Inhibitor”

Virologist Dittmann, on the other hand, starts her research at the beginning of the viral disease. She managed to significantly curb the multiplication of Sars-CoV-2 in the dish in the laboratory. “I rate the inhibitor as very promising in the medium term,” she told the “Spiegel”. Because it is also clear to them: Preventing an infection through vaccination is the best way, according to Dittmann. But: “Not everyone will want to be vaccinated, and for medical reasons it might not be possible for everyone.” And: One hundred percent protection is not guaranteed even with a successful vaccination. “An antiviral agent is important in all of these cases.”

At best, this should be developed in tablet form. This is the only way that Covid-19 drugs, like antibiotics, can be made easily accessible to a broad masses, Dittmann is convinced. The basis of their research is a substance that Pfizer developed several years ago for so-called proteases, but which was then discontinued due to a lack of demand. Today the virologist is celebrating success in terms of her effectiveness, at least in the laboratory.

How can the active ingredient stop the virus?

Administration in the early stages of the disease is essential for this. Because Sars-CoV-2 penetrates into the host cells of humans and hijacks them. The genome of the virus then uses the machinery of the infected human cell to make its own viral proteins – the components for new viruses. A certain protease, an enzyme that can split proteins, plays a key role in reproduction.

This is exactly where the active ingredient from Dittmann and Pfizer should be used to stop the production of new viruses. According to Dittmann, the virus needs the protease immediately after entering the cell. “When the protease is switched off, the cycle is immediately stopped before the virus even begins to multiply.” In addition, the protease of the virus differs significantly from that of humans. The scientists suspect that an inhibitor would therefore only bind to the right target with a high degree of probability. Unwanted side effects would hardly occur.

Several hurdles have to be overcome

Scientists like Dittmann are working flat out on such a drug around the world – but largely unnoticed by the public. But developing an inhibitor in pill form is not easy. According to Dittmann, there are several difficulties: On the one hand, the active ingredient must not be too water-soluble, otherwise it cannot penetrate the fatty membrane. On the other hand, the substance must not be too fat-soluble, otherwise it will get stuck in the membrane. In addition, many cells defend themselves against foreign substances and simply reject them.

After the successful experiments in Dittmann’s laboratory, Pfizer has apparently already started testing the active ingredient on humans. The disadvantage: the substance has to be injected. “The intravenous administration must take place in the hospital, probably over several days,” said Dittmann. Availability and timing were easier to achieve with an inhibitor that you just swallow. But it will be some time before a pill against the coronavirus actually comes onto the market.

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HIV expert: “Antiviral depot”: New drug gives hope in the fight against AIDS

The EU health authority ECDC and the WHO are currently warning of an increase in undetected HIV cases in Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia. Now a new drug gives hope. It is intended to be administered like a vaccine dose. ntv speaks with HIV researcher Prof. Goffinet from the Charité.

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In the United States, they named a possible date for vaccination of the population against COVID-19 :: Society :: RBC

The first vaccinations could begin on December 11 or 12, the presidential adviser on vaccine development said. He explained that a meeting is scheduled for December 10, at which it may be possible to give permission to use the drug Pfizer.

Фото: David Dee Delgado / Getty Images

The campaign, in which US residents will be vaccinated against coronavirus, may start on December 11. This was announced to CNN by the adviser to the President of the United States on vaccine development Moncef Sloughi.

He said that Pfizer has applied for registration of its vaccine for emergency use with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A meeting on this matter is scheduled for December 10.

“We plan to start shipping batches of vaccine to vaccination sites within 24 hours after drug approval is received, so I guess maybe a day or two after approval, on December 11 or 12. [начнется вакцинация]”- explained Sloughie.

Moderna estimates one dose of its COVID-19 vaccine at $ 25- $ 37

Фото:Bill Sikes / AP

He also expressed the hope that people will stop doubting the effectiveness of the vaccine. According to Sloughy, many misunderstood the FDA’s 50% “minimum drug efficacy” indicator, and believed that this is the effectiveness of the vaccine itself.

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