Reasons for the life-threatening course of the disease deciphered – healing practice

Fatty liver becomes a life-threatening disease

A non-alcoholic fatty liver often goes undetected for a long time and, if left untreated, can lead to serious damage to the liver in the long term with corresponding complications. A recent study has now made it clear how non-alcoholic fatty liver can develop into a life-threatening disease.

A research team from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Center for Diabetes Research has examined the mechanisms by which non-alcoholic fatty liver can lead to inflammation in the liver, which in turn significantly increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. The results of the corresponding study were published in the specialist magazine “Cell Metabolism”.

Around one in four has fatty liver

“Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common liver disease worldwide and occurs in around 25 percent of the world’s population. More than 90 percent of overweight people, 60 percent of people with diabetes and up to 20 percent of those of normal weight develop the disease, ”reports Helmholtz Zentrum München in a press release on the current study results.

Imminent complication in the further course

As the name suggests, fatty liver disease is primarily characterized by the accumulation of fat in the liver. To a certain extent, the fat deposits do not impair organ function, but there is a risk of developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Inflammation in the liver, possibly accompanied by liver fibrosis, are typical features. In the further course, the non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can also lead to life-threatening liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancer.

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis as a consequence

“If people with non-alcoholic fatty liver also develop liver fibrosis, this is a strong sign of an increased long-term risk of death,” says the Helmholtz Center in Munich. How a relatively harmless fatty liver can lead to advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis has not yet been fully clarified.

“If we understand which mechanisms turn fatty liver into a life-threatening disease, then we have also found the key to looking for better therapeutic options and preventive measures,” emphasizes Stephan Herzig, director of the Helmholtz Diabetes Center at the Helmholtz Zentrum München.

Liver cells are reprogrammed

In their study, the researchers used genome analyzes to examine the mechanisms that control the development and function of the most common cell type in the liver (hepatocytes). It became clear “that hepatocytes suffer a partial loss of identity during the further development to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, they are reprogrammed”, says the first author of the study, Anne Loft from Helmholtz Zentrum München.

This reprogramming of the hepatocytes is strictly controlled by a network of proteins, with the proteins acting as molecular switches (so-called “transcription factors”). The activity of the proteins leads to the dysfunction of the hepatocytes and the protein network also plays an essential role in the development of fibrosis, reports the Helmholtz Zentrum München.

Cellular mechanisms deciphered

“These findings are important because they unlock the cellular mechanisms that underlie non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The knowledge about the role of protein networks and the loss of identity of the hepatocytes provides us with potential target structures and intervention options for the development of effective therapies, ”summarizes Ana Alfaro from Helmholtz Zentrum München, also first author of the study.

The research team hopes that, based on the findings from the study, new approaches can now be developed to target specific nodes in the protein network and thus prevent the progression of fatty liver disease or even reverse an existing fibrosis, which has not yet been possible. (fp)

Also read:

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Anne Loft, Ana Jimena Alfaro, Søren Fisker Schmidt, Felix Boel Pedersen, Mike Krogh Terkelsen, Michele Puglia, Kan Kau Chow, Annette Feuchtinger, Maria Troullinaki, Adriano Maida, Gretchen Wolff, Minako Sakurai, Riccardo Berutti, Bilgen Ekim Üstünel, Peter Nawroth , Kim Ravnskjaer, Mauricio Berriel Diaz, Blagoy Blagoev, Stephan Herzig: Liver-fibrosis-activated transcriptional networks govern hepatocyte reprogramming and intra-hepatic communication; in: Cell Metabolism (published 07.07.2021), sciencedirect.com
  • Helmholtz Zentrum München: From fatty liver to life-threatening disease: Researchers discover reasons for a dramatic course of the disease (published July 12, 2021), helmholtz-muenchen.de

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

This is how fatty liver becomes a life-threatening disease – healing practice

Reasons for the dramatic course of the disease in fatty liver disease deciphered

A non-alcoholic fatty liver often goes undetected for a long time and, if left untreated, can lead to severe damage to the liver in the long term with corresponding complications. In a recent study it has now become clear how non-alcoholic fatty liver can develop into a life-threatening disease.

A research team from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Center for Diabetes Research has examined the mechanisms by which non-alcoholic fatty liver can lead to inflammation in the liver, which in turn significantly increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. The results of the corresponding study were published in the specialist magazine “Cell Metabolism”.

Around one in four has fatty liver

“Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common liver disease worldwide and occurs in around 25 percent of the world’s population. More than 90 percent of overweight people, 60 percent of people with diabetes and up to 20 percent of those of normal weight develop the disease, ”reports Helmholtz Zentrum München in a press release on the current study results.

Imminent complication in the further course

As the name suggests, fatty liver disease is primarily characterized by the accumulation of fat in the liver. To a certain extent, the fat deposits do not impair organ function, but there is a risk of developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Inflammation in the liver, possibly accompanied by liver fibrosis, are typical features. In the further course of the disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can also lead to life-threatening liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancer.

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis as a consequence

“If people with non-alcoholic fatty liver also develop liver fibrosis, this is a strong sign of an increased long-term risk of death,” says the Helmholtz Center in Munich. How a relatively harmless fatty liver can lead to advanced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis has not yet been fully clarified.

“If we understand which mechanisms turn fatty liver into a life-threatening disease, then we have also found the key to looking for better therapeutic options and preventive measures,” emphasizes Stephan Herzig, director of the Helmholtz Diabetes Center at the Helmholtz Zentrum München.

Liver cells are reprogrammed

In their study, the researchers used genome analyzes to examine the mechanisms that control the development and function of the most common cell type in the liver (hepatocytes). It became clear “that hepatocytes suffer a partial loss of identity during the further development to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, they are reprogrammed”, says the first author of the study, Anne Loft from Helmholtz Zentrum München.

This reprogramming of the hepatocytes is strictly controlled by a network of proteins, with the proteins acting as molecular switches (so-called “transcription factors”). The activity of the proteins leads to the dysfunction of the hepatocytes and the protein network also plays an essential role in the development of fibrosis, reports the Helmholtz Zentrum München.

Cellular mechanisms deciphered

“These findings are important because they unlock the cellular mechanisms that underlie non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The knowledge about the role of protein networks and the loss of identity of the hepatocytes provides us with potential target structures and intervention options for the development of effective therapies, ”summarizes Ana Alfaro from Helmholtz Zentrum München, also first author of the study.

The research team hopes that, based on the findings from the study, new approaches can now be developed to target specific nodes in the protein network and thus prevent the progression of fatty liver disease or even reverse an existing fibrosis, which has not yet been possible. (fp)

Also read:

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Anne Loft, Ana Jimena Alfaro, Søren Fisker Schmidt, Felix Boel Pedersen, Mike Krogh Terkelsen, Michele Puglia, Kan Kau Chow, Annette Feuchtinger, Maria Troullinaki, Adriano Maida, Gretchen Wolff, Minako Sakurai, Riccardo Berutti, Bilgen Ekim Üstünel, Peter Nawroth , Kim Ravnskjaer, Mauricio Berriel Diaz, Blagoy Blagoev, Stephan Herzig: Liver-fibrosis-activated transcriptional networks govern hepatocyte reprogramming and intra-hepatic communication; in: Cell Metabolism (published 07.07.2021), sciencedirect.com
  • Helmholtz Zentrum München: From fatty liver to life-threatening disease: Researchers discover reasons for a dramatic course of the disease (published July 12, 2021), helmholtz-muenchen.de

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

What does not alcohol do in the body

Germans drink almost eleven liters of pure alcohol per capita every year. But what happens in the body when you go without alcohol for a while? Even a few weeks of abstinence has amazing effects.

For many, a beer after work or a glass of wine is part of everyday life. For many people, drinking in company is simply a part of it. If you refuse, it is not uncommon for you to be looked at incorrectly. But strictly avoiding alcohol for a while or keeping it low is a good idea first.

“Basically there is no safe alcohol consumption. Even small amounts of alcohol increase the risk of cell damage to the liver. One thing is certain: the higher the consumption, the more harmful,” explains Georg Poppele, spokesman for the working group for qualified withdrawal in internal medicine of the German Association Internists. Cardiovascular and cancer diseases in particular can be the result.

Do without – but how long?

“Within two months, absolute abstinence can also cause detectable damage to the liver, such as alcohol-related inflammation or fatty liver,” says Poppele. And just two to four weeks of abstinence can help the immune system to recover.

Time without alcohol Effects
After a day
  • With regular consumption you will miss
    possibly your daily glass of wine or beer.
After one
up to two weeks
  • More restful sleep
  • Increased efficiency
  • Stored fats in the liver are broken down
After a month
  • Awareness of alcohol consumption
  • Ability to concentrate
  • improved complexion, firmer and smoother
  • Weight loss
After a year
  • The liver is completely recovered
  • The fat metabolism runs better
  • more energy and performance
  • continue to have a good night’s sleep
  • a more positive body feeling through all improvements

Alcohol consumption that is still acceptable in terms of health 12 grams of pure alcohol per day for women and 24 grams of pure alcohol for men are exceeded by around 13 percent of women and around 16 percent of men.

Calculate the alcohol content of a drink:

The amount of the drink in milliliters (ml)
The alcohol content in percent by volume (% by volume)
The specific gravity of alcohol. This value is 0.8 g / ml.

The formula for the calculation:
Alcohol content (in grams of pure alcohol) = amount of the drink (in ml) x (% by volume / 100) x 0.8

Example:
1 Glass of Beer (300 ml, 5 Vol.-%):
300 ml x (5/100) x 0.8 = 12 g alcohol

Lose weight during the alcohol break

During the consumption of alcohol, certain areas of the brain that are responsible for appetite and the feeling of hunger are activated. We are only too happy to reach into the chip bowl or buy a kebab before going to bed. The salty snacks that can often be found in bars also make you thirsty again. Avoiding alcohol can also prevent food cravings.

Another reason why many people lose weight during breaks is the fact that many drinks – especially sweet cocktails – contain a lot of sugar and are calorie bombs.

Sleep better without alcohol

It’s known to be easier to fall asleep with alcohol, but research has shown that sleep quality is poorer. The restless sleep means that you are not rested the next morning. For the time being, not doing it can mean that you will fall asleep more difficult. You are used to the effects of the wine or beer in the evening. In return, your sleep will be better overall.

Better skin without alcohol

On the one hand, alcohol removes water from the body, the skin can appear dry and pale as a result. On the other hand, alcohol can make the face look puffy, for example. This is because it activates a hormone that absorbs water. By doing without, you give the skin a break. It can regulate the moisture balance and recover.

Curb the desire for alcohol

“It is fundamentally difficult to change one’s behavior,” says Michaela Goecke, head of the BZgA’s addiction prevention department. “If you have successfully done without for a while, you can reward yourself with a visit to the cinema, for example.” Small tricks help to get a grip on the desire for alcohol: If you do a little thing or distract yourself in such a situation, the desire for alcohol often passes quickly.

Alcohol is often a part of social gatherings. So should you stay at home during a drinking break? Social events should not be avoided as a matter of principle. “But you should make your position clear: in the form of a friendly but determined no to alcohol,” says Goecke. “It’s not rude not to drink alcohol.” There are also many non-alcoholic alternatives to the usual drinks.

Do not make up for alcohol twice after the break

However, caution is advised when the alcohol fasting period is over. “Anyone who proves their ability to abstain for a month and then drinks all the more and makes up for doing without is doing themselves a disservice,” warns Prof. Falk Kiefer. Instead, the medical director of the Clinic for Dependent Behavior and Addiction Medicine at the Central Institute for Mental Health in Mannheim advises to avoid alcohol regularly on at least two days a week. This also helps the body in the long term.

Important NOTE: The information is in no way a substitute for professional advice or treatment by trained and recognized doctors. The contents of t-online cannot and must not be used to independently make diagnoses or start treatments.

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High risk of diabetes due to hormonal imbalance – medical practice

Diabetes: High risk of developing the disease in women with PCOS

Around 15 percent of women of childbearing age in Germany suffer from a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). According to experts, the most common hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of developing diabetes. The risk of developing fatty liver is also significantly higher for those affected.

Stubborn obesity, increased body hair, thinning scalp hair, unfulfilled desire to have children and acne – behind this can be a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), explains the German Diabetes Society (DDG) in a current press release. What many affected women are not aware of: The complex disruption of the hormonal control loop also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two to nine times. In addition, patients with PCOS are four times more likely to develop fatty liver.

About 15 percent of women are affected

As explained on Austria’s public health portal “Gesundheit.gv.at”, PCO syndrome (polycystic ovarian syndrome, PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder in women.

In Germany, around 15 percent of women of childbearing age suffer from PCOS. According to the DDG, among other things, the balance of sex hormones is disturbed. An excess of male hormones can lead to a masculinization of the female silhouette. In addition, according to the male distribution pattern, scalp hair falls out and grows in other places.

Too much testosterone also interferes with the development of the follicles. This manifests itself as a menstrual cycle disorder and infertility. In the ultrasound examination of the ovaries, in more than 70 percent of the cases a typical string of pearls is visible in the follicles.

“These many small cysts gave the disease its name,” explains private lecturer Dr. med. Susanne Reger-Tan, Head of the Diabetes Center Diabetologikum DDG at the Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism at the University Clinic Essen.

Hard to break vicious circle

However, the term “PCOS” does not reveal the close connection with type 2 diabetes at first glance. Because the metabolism is also affected: many patients are very overweight, which, despite all the efforts, simply does not want to give way. This is due to an also occurring insulin resistance.

“The reduced sensitivity of the body’s cells to react to insulin leads to an excess of insulin in the blood,” says Reger-Tan. This in turn stimulates further weight gain and increases the excess of male hormones.

This begins a vicious circle that is difficult to break of insulin resistance, weight gain, even more male hormones and further dulling of the body’s cells against insulin.

As a result, there is a risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes at a young age.

Individual approach regarding the choice of therapy

As the DDG writes, the variety of symptoms in PCOS, which can also be present in different forms – requires an individual approach with regard to the choice of therapy:

“The optimal treatment strategy is based on the symptoms and the individual suffering of the woman concerned. In any case, it should also include concepts for avoiding long-term complications such as diabetes, ”explains Reger-Tan.

This includes the consistent clarification, monitoring and, if necessary, therapy of possible metabolic diseases, says the endocrinologist, diabetologist and nutritionist. Reger-Tan regrets that there is still no approved pharmacotherapy for the treatment of PCOS.

“Every practitioner and patient should know about the high risk of diabetes – this is the only way we can control the possible consequences of PCOS,” says Professor Dr. med. Matthias M. Weber, media spokesman for the German Society for Endocrinology (DGE). (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • German Diabetes Society: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is often associated with type 2 diabetes, (accessed: June 8, 2021), German Diabetes Society
  • Public health portal in Austria: www.gesundheit.gv.at: Polycystic Ovar Syndrome (PCOS), (accessed: June 8, 2021), Gesundheit.gv.at

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Increased risk of diabetes due to hormonal disorder – healing practice

Diabetes: High risk of developing the disease in women with PCOS

Around 15 percent of women of childbearing age in Germany suffer from a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). According to experts, the most common hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of developing diabetes. The risk of developing fatty liver is also significantly higher for those affected.

Stubborn obesity, increased body hair, thinning scalp hair, unfulfilled desire to have children and acne – behind this can be a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), explains the German Diabetes Society (DDG) in a current press release. What many affected women are not aware of: The complex disruption of the hormonal control loop also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two to nine times. In addition, patients with PCOS are four times more likely to develop fatty liver.

About 15 percent of women are affected

As explained on Austria’s public health portal “Gesundheit.gv.at”, PCO syndrome (polycystic ovarian syndrome, PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder in women.

In Germany, around 15 percent of women of childbearing age suffer from PCOS. According to the DDG, the balance of sex hormones is disrupted. An excess of male hormones can therefore lead to a masculinization of the female silhouette. In addition, according to the male distribution pattern, scalp hair falls out and grows in other places.

Too much testosterone also interferes with the development of the follicles. This manifests itself as a menstrual cycle disorder and infertility. In the ultrasound examination of the ovaries, a typical string-like arrangement of the follicles is visible in more than 70 percent of the cases.

“These many small cysts gave the disease its name,” explains private lecturer Dr. med. Susanne Reger-Tan, Head of the Diabetes Center Diabetologikum DDG at the Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism at the University Clinic Essen.

Hard to break vicious circle

However, the term “PCOS” does not reveal the close connection with type 2 diabetes at first glance. Because the metabolism is also affected: many patients are very overweight, which despite all the efforts simply does not want to give way. This is due to an also occurring insulin resistance.

“The reduced sensitivity of the body’s cells to react to insulin leads to an excess of insulin in the blood,” says Reger-Tan. This in turn stimulates further weight gain and increases the excess of male hormones.

This begins a vicious circle that is difficult to break of insulin resistance, weight gain, even more male hormones and further dulling of the body’s cells against insulin.

As a result, there is a risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes at an early age.

Individual approach regarding the choice of therapy

As the DDG writes, the variety of symptoms in PCOS, which can also be present in different forms – requires an individual approach with regard to the choice of therapy:

“The optimal treatment strategy is based on the symptoms and the individual suffering of the woman concerned. In any case, it should also include concepts for avoiding long-term complications such as diabetes, ”explains Reger-Tan.

This includes the consistent clarification, monitoring and, if necessary, therapy of possible metabolic diseases, says the endocrinologist, diabetologist and nutritionist. Reger-Tan regrets that there is still no approved pharmacotherapy for the treatment of PCOS.

“Every practitioner and patient should know about the high risk of diabetes – this is the only way we can control the possible consequences of PCOS,” says Professor Dr. med. Matthias M. Weber, media spokesman for the German Society for Endocrinology (DGE). (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • German Diabetes Society: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is often associated with type 2 diabetes, (accessed: June 8, 2021), German Diabetes Society
  • Public health portal in Austria: www.gesundheit.gv.at: Polycystic Ovar Syndrome (PCOS), (accessed: June 8, 2021), Gesundheit.gv.at

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Hormone disorder increases risk of diabetes – healing practice

Diabetes: High risk of developing the disease in women with PCOS

Around 15 percent of women of childbearing age in Germany suffer from a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). According to experts, the most common hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of developing diabetes. The risk of developing fatty liver is also significantly higher for those affected.

Stubborn obesity, increased body hair, thinning scalp hair, unfulfilled desire to have children and acne – behind this can be a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), explains the German Diabetes Society (DDG) in a current press release. What many affected women are not aware of: The complex disruption of the hormonal control loop also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two to nine times. In addition, patients with PCOS are four times more likely to develop fatty liver.

About 15 percent of women are affected

As explained on Austria’s public health portal “Gesundheit.gv.at”, PCO syndrome (polycystic ovarian syndrome, PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder in women.

In Germany, around 15 percent of women of childbearing age suffer from PCOS. According to the DDG, the balance of sex hormones is disrupted. An excess of male hormones can therefore lead to a masculinization of the female silhouette. In addition, according to the male distribution pattern, scalp hair falls out and grows in other places.

Too much testosterone also interferes with the development of the follicles. This manifests itself as a menstrual cycle disorder and infertility. In the ultrasound examination of the ovaries, a typical string-like arrangement of the follicles is visible in more than 70 percent of the cases.

“These many small cysts gave the disease its name,” explains private lecturer Dr. med. Susanne Reger-Tan, Head of the Diabetes Center Diabetologikum DDG at the Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism at the University Clinic Essen.

Hard to break vicious circle

However, the term “PCOS” does not reveal the close connection with type 2 diabetes at first glance. Because the metabolism is also affected: many patients are very overweight, which, despite all the efforts, simply does not want to give way. This is due to an also occurring insulin resistance.

“The reduced sensitivity of the body’s cells to react to insulin leads to an excess of insulin in the blood,” says Reger-Tan. This in turn stimulates further weight gain and increases the excess of male hormones.

This begins a vicious circle that is difficult to break of insulin resistance, weight gain, even more male hormones and further dulling of the body’s cells against insulin.

As a result, there is a risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes at an early age.

Individual approach regarding the choice of therapy

As the DDG writes, the variety of symptoms in PCOS, which can also be present in different forms – requires an individual approach with regard to the choice of therapy:

“The optimal treatment strategy is based on the symptoms and the individual suffering of the woman concerned. In any case, it should also include concepts for avoiding long-term complications such as diabetes, ”explains Reger-Tan.

This includes the consistent clarification, monitoring and, if necessary, therapy of possible metabolic diseases, says the endocrinologist, diabetologist and nutritionist. Reger-Tan regrets that there is still no approved pharmacotherapy for the treatment of PCOS.

“Every practitioner and patient should know about the high risk of diabetes – this is the only way we can control the possible consequences of PCOS,” says Professor Dr. med. Matthias M. Weber, media spokesman for the German Society for Endocrinology (DGE). (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • German Diabetes Society: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is often associated with type 2 diabetes, (accessed: June 8, 2021), German Diabetes Society
  • Public health portal in Austria: www.gesundheit.gv.at: Polycystic Ovar Syndrome (PCOS), (accessed: June 8, 2021), Gesundheit.gv.at

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Hormonal disorder in women promotes diabetes risk – healing practice

Diabetes: High risk of developing the disease in women with PCOS

Around 15 percent of women of childbearing age in Germany suffer from a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). According to experts, the most common hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of developing diabetes. The risk of developing fatty liver is also significantly higher for those affected.

Stubborn obesity, increased body hair, thinning scalp hair, unfulfilled desire to have children and acne – behind this can be a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), explains the German Diabetes Society (DDG) in a current press release. What many affected women are not aware of: The complex disruption of the hormonal control loop also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two to nine times. In addition, patients with PCOS are four times more likely to develop fatty liver.

About 15 percent of women are affected

As explained on Austria’s public health portal “Gesundheit.gv.at”, PCO syndrome (polycystic ovarian syndrome, PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder in women.

In Germany, around 15 percent of women of childbearing age suffer from PCOS. According to the DDG, the balance of sex hormones is disrupted. An excess of male hormones can therefore lead to a masculinization of the female silhouette. In addition, according to the male distribution pattern, scalp hair falls out and grows in other places.

Too much testosterone also interferes with the development of the follicles. This manifests itself as a menstrual cycle disorder and infertility. In the ultrasound examination of the ovaries, a typical string-like arrangement of the follicles is visible in more than 70 percent of the cases.

“These many small cysts gave the disease its name,” explains private lecturer Dr. med. Susanne Reger-Tan, Head of the Diabetes Center Diabetologikum DDG at the Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism at the University Clinic Essen.

Hard to break vicious circle

However, the term “PCOS” does not reveal the close connection with type 2 diabetes at first glance. Because the metabolism is also affected: many patients are very overweight, which, despite all the efforts, simply does not want to give way. This is due to an also occurring insulin resistance.

“The reduced sensitivity of the body’s cells to react to insulin leads to an excess of insulin in the blood,” says Reger-Tan. This in turn stimulates further weight gain and increases the excess of male hormones.

This begins a vicious circle that is difficult to break of insulin resistance, weight gain, even more male hormones and further dulling of the body’s cells against insulin.

As a result, there is a risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes at an early age.

Individual approach regarding the choice of therapy

As the DDG writes, the variety of symptoms in PCOS, which can also be present in different forms – requires an individual approach with regard to the choice of therapy:

“The optimal treatment strategy is based on the symptoms and the individual suffering of the woman concerned. In any case, it should also include concepts for avoiding long-term complications such as diabetes, ”explains Reger-Tan.

This includes the consistent clarification, monitoring and, if necessary, therapy of possible metabolic diseases, says the endocrinologist, diabetologist and nutritionist. Reger-Tan regrets that there is still no approved pharmacotherapy for the treatment of PCOS.

“Every practitioner and patient should know about the high risk of diabetes – this is the only way we can control the possible consequences of PCOS,” says Professor Dr. med. Matthias M. Weber, media spokesman for the German Society for Endocrinology (DGE). (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • German Diabetes Society: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is often associated with type 2 diabetes, (accessed: June 8, 2021), German Diabetes Society
  • Public health portal in Austria: www.gesundheit.gv.at: Polycystic Ovar Syndrome (PCOS), (accessed: June 8, 2021), Gesundheit.gv.at

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of diabetes – medical practice

Diabetes: High risk of developing the disease in women with PCOS

Around 15 percent of women of childbearing age in Germany suffer from a polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). According to experts, the most common hormonal disorder in women increases the risk of developing diabetes. The risk of developing fatty liver is also significantly higher for those affected.

Stubborn obesity, increased body hair, thinning scalp hair, unfulfilled desire to have children and acne – behind this can be a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), explains the German Diabetes Society (DDG) in a current press release. What many affected women are not aware of: The complex disruption of the hormonal control loop also increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by two to nine times. In addition, patients with PCOS are four times more likely to develop fatty liver.

About 15 percent of women are affected

As explained on Austria’s public health portal “Gesundheit.gv.at”, PCO syndrome (polycystic ovarian syndrome, PCOS) is the most common hormonal disorder in women.

In Germany, around 15 percent of women of childbearing age suffer from PCOS. According to the DDG, the balance of sex hormones is disrupted. An excess of male hormones can therefore lead to a masculinization of the female silhouette. In addition, according to the male distribution pattern, scalp hair falls out and grows in other places.

Too much testosterone also interferes with the development of the follicles. This manifests itself as a menstrual cycle disorder and infertility. In the ultrasound examination of the ovaries, a typical string-like arrangement of the follicles is visible in more than 70 percent of the cases.

“These many small cysts gave the disease its name,” explains private lecturer Dr. med. Susanne Reger-Tan, Head of the Diabetes Center Diabetologikum DDG at the Clinic for Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism at the University Clinic Essen.

Hard to break vicious circle

However, the term “PCOS” does not reveal the close connection with type 2 diabetes at first glance. Because the metabolism is also affected: many patients are very overweight, which, despite all the efforts, simply does not want to give way. This is due to an also occurring insulin resistance.

“The reduced sensitivity of the body’s cells to react to insulin leads to an excess of insulin in the blood,” says Reger-Tan. This in turn stimulates further weight gain and increases the excess of male hormones.

This begins a vicious circle that is difficult to break of insulin resistance, weight gain, even more male hormones and further dulling of the body’s cells against insulin.

As a result, there is a risk of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes at an early age.

Individual approach regarding the choice of therapy

As the DDG writes, the variety of symptoms in PCOS, which can also be present in different forms – requires an individual approach with regard to the choice of therapy:

“The optimal treatment strategy is based on the symptoms and the individual suffering of the woman concerned. In any case, it should also include concepts for avoiding long-term complications such as diabetes, ”explains Reger-Tan.

This includes the consistent clarification, monitoring and, if necessary, therapy of possible metabolic diseases, says the endocrinologist, diabetologist and nutritionist. Reger-Tan regrets that there is still no approved pharmacotherapy for the treatment of PCOS.

“Every practitioner and patient should know about the high risk of diabetes – this is the only way to control the possible consequences of PCOS,” says Professor Dr. med. Matthias M. Weber, media spokesman for the German Society for Endocrinology (DGE). (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • German Diabetes Society: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is often associated with type 2 diabetes, (accessed: June 8, 2021), German Diabetes Society
  • Public health portal in Austria: www.gesundheit.gv.at: Polycystic Ovar Syndrome (PCOS), (accessed: June 8, 2021), Gesundheit.gv.at

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

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Corona vaccination particularly important for people with liver disease – healing practice

COVID-19 vaccination for people with liver disease

The declining corona infection numbers give cause for hope. They can also be traced back to the vaccinations against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus or the COVID-19 disease caused by the pathogen. But not all particularly vulnerable people have been vaccinated yet. Vaccination is particularly important for some people – including those with liver disease.

In more and more federal states, vaccination prioritization for medical practices is being lifted. Many people with liver disease and liver transplants are among the priority people to be vaccinated. The German Liver Aid e. V., the German Liver Foundation and the Gastro-Liga e. V. emphasize the importance of the COVID-19 vaccination for this risk group.

Increased risk of liver disease

“The Standing Vaccination Commission (STIKO) regularly evaluates the recommendation for COVID-19 vaccination, taking into account the vaccination rates, the surveys on vaccination acceptance and studies on vaccination effectiveness and safety,” explains Professor Dr. Christoph Sarrazin, CEO of Deutsche Leberhilfe e. V. in a communication.

“Among the diseases that, according to studies, could currently be associated with an increased risk of a severe COVID-19 course, the STIKO includes cirrhotic and severe liver diseases – including liver cirrhosis, chronic liver failure and post-liver transplantation,” said the expert.

The organizers of the 22nd German Liver Day on November 20, 2021 – Deutsche Leberhilfe e. V., German Liver Foundation and Gastro-Liga e. V. “support this vaccination recommendation, and we refer to initial analyzes that show that the immune system of organ transplant recipients shows a reduced immune response to vaccinations in general as well as to vaccination against COVID-19,” explains Prof. Sarrazin.

“That is why protection through contact restrictions and compliance with the known hygiene and distance rules remain important for this group of patients. The COVID-19 vaccination of household members of organ transplant recipients can offer additional protection. “

Vaccination prioritization partially canceled

After a pandemic for over a year, many corona measures designed to reduce the risk of infection, such as wearing masks, keeping your distance and hygiene rules, have almost become a matter of course for most people.

In addition, vaccines against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 have been administered in Germany since the end of December 2020 – so far, four vaccines have been approved in the European Union.

More than fifteen percent of the total German population are now fully vaccinated. Due to the high demand for vaccines and the limited production capacities, priority was and is given in vaccination centers in Germany as well.

However, vaccination prioritization for medical practices is currently being lifted in more and more federal states. As stated in the announcement, many people with liver disease and liver transplants are among the priority people to be vaccinated.

Vaccination recommended

The organizers of the German Liver Day recommend vaccination with the currently available and approved vaccines on the basis of the data and findings available to date.

This also applies to patients with fatty liver and chronic viral hepatitis as well as to all rare liver diseases such as primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and vascular liver diseases. Vaccination is particularly urgent for people with liver cirrhosis, patients on the waiting list for a liver transplant and those who have already had liver transplants.

All approved COVID-19 vaccines are not live vaccines, they are not contagious and are also suitable for immunocompromised people.

The side effects known to date include flu-like symptoms and reactions directly at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions have only occurred in rare cases; therefore, additional precautionary measures should be taken in consultation with a doctor in people with a known predisposition.

The benefit of vaccination, which protects against SARS-CoV-2 infection, theoretically far outweighs possible undesirable vaccination reactions, so that vaccination is recommended for all patients.

Positive risk-benefit ratio

With two vector vaccines (AstraZeneca / Johnson & Johnson) very rare cases of cerebral vein thromboses and other thromboses were observed, explains the German Liver Foundation eV on its website.

With AstraZeneca’s Vaxzevria vaccine, a causal relationship is now considered likely. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) emphasizes the positive risk-benefit ratio for this vaccine as well.

Since April, the STIKO has only recommended the vaccine for people aged 60 and over. However, if they so wish, younger men and women may also be vaccinated with Vaxzevria after medical judgment, personal risk assessment and careful education.

The EMA also published a statement on April 20, 2021 for the use of the COVID-19 vector vaccine from Janssen-Cilag / Johnson & Johnson and continues to assess the overall benefit-risk assessment as positive.

The use of this vaccine below the age limit of 60 years also remains possible after medical advice and with individual risk acceptance by the person to be vaccinated.

No additional vaccination risks for those with liver disease

No additional vaccination risks are known to date for people with liver disease. All side effects are monitored, collected in registers and evaluated.

In particular, patients with autoimmune liver diseases are often very cautious and skeptical about vaccinations, as they fear that their disease will worsen.

Again, according to the experts, the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the possible risks.

In any case, it is advisable for those with liver disease to speak to their general practitioner or the treating specialist before a COVID-19 vaccination – especially if they have any questions or fears. (ad)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Swell:

  • Deutsche Leberhilfe eV: Press release: “Your liver. Your life. ”: COVID-19 vaccination and caution are particularly important for those with liver disease, (accessed: 30.05.2021), lebertag.org
  • Deutsche Leberhilfe eV: Info page: COVID-19, liver diseases and vaccinations, (accessed: May 30, 2021), Deutsche Leberhilfe eV

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

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