Why sailor Isabelle Joschke almost capsized

LSlowly, slowly, Isabelle Joschke tries to reach the coast of Brazil. The city of Salvador de Bahia is your destination. With a cruising speed of six to eight knots, she comes closer to that. The sailors are dependent on the forces of nature, sometimes it can be cruel to them, for example to her.

On January 10, she had to give up because the main hydraulic cylinder on the keel fin broke during heavy gusts of wind in the South Atlantic. A few days earlier she had made a makeshift repair, in vain. As a result, the keel was no longer centered and Joschke could not continue. But the problem is not gone, it is difficult to keep the boat straight and Joschke is still out at sea. Every storm is a danger to them. In the last few days she has only narrowly escaped a disaster, her boat almost capsized. “The mast was already in the water,” she told the “Süddeutsche Zeitung”.

Joschke still has a big task ahead of him, even though she is no longer in the race. “I have to make sure to keep the boat as flat as possible,” she wrote on Instagram on Wednesday. “If the boat leans sharply, the keel sways under the wind and increases this lean”. If that happens again – then she could get into a vicious circle.

Joschke is like a high wire artist who tries not to fall off the narrow rope. You can keep your yacht flat thanks to the foils and the shape of the boat – it is quite wide. You try to avoid vibrations. “I’m on my guard all the time,” she writes. “In order to preserve the boat, we must definitely prevent the keel from moving too much and therefore avoid impacts, lurching or swaying.”

While Joschke is busy with it, the leading group is preparing for the final. After you have passed Cape Horn, you still have to overcome the calm winds of the Azores. In the Bay of Biscay there will be a finale close to you. “It will be the most incredible week of all the Vendée Globe Finals. All six or seven boats can come close together, ”said Herrmann on Thursday.

The French Charlie Dalin is currently leading the group, Boris Herrmann sailing about 77 nautical miles behind him on Thursday, followed by Thomas Ruyant and Louis Burton. “I feel good. It’s good for morale to be second, even if it doesn’t mean much at the moment. ”It is still difficult to predict who will be the first to reach the port in Les Sables-d’Olonne. It will not be the sailor Joschke – it is planned that she will reach Salvador de Bahia on Monday morning, Brazilian time.

The Vendée Globe is considered the toughest regatta for single-handed sailors. It began on November 8th on the French Atlantic coast and leads around the globe along the Southern Ocean. Boris Herrmann is the first German to take part.

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Sailor Boris Herrmann takes third place

Dhe surprise came on Friday night. Boris Herrmann was the fastest sailor in the leading group and now sails in third position at the Vendée Globe. In the past few days, the hamburger had worked his way up and is now attacking Charlie Dalin and Louis Burton. “I am currently benefiting the most from my foils and am gradually gaining speed,” said Boris Herrmann in the Vendée Globe livestream on Friday.

He sat grinning on the deck of his yacht in the sunshine with headphones on. Because of the warm temperatures, he only wore a black T-shirt. “I am fine. Yesterday I suffered from the extreme heat. Today I can cope better with it, ”said Herrmann. The leading group of the Vendée Globe fleet sailed on Friday morning around 200 nautical miles from the Brazilian coast towards the equator, which it intends to cross over the weekend. The man from Hamburg reported that he had received a lot of messages from friends, but also from strangers, telling him how much they admired his performance. “There is definitely a chance of victory,” Herrmann said on Thursday.

“The conditions are just perfect for sailing fast.” The leading group will reach the northern hemisphere in about six days. It remains exciting to see which final racing decisions the German skipper will then make. One thing was already clear to him: “Applying a little pressure on the others is a fantastic option.”

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Boris Herrmann faces an Atlantic sailing crime thriller


On course for the podium: Boris Herrmann
Image: Jean-Marie LIOT / Malizia

In the toughest sailing regatta in the world, Boris Herrmann could even land on the podium in the end. Before that, there are still 4,700 nautical miles through the Atlantic. But the German has a decisive advantage.

Boris Herrmann has reported back during his solo circumnavigation in the battle for the podium. After setbacks in Cape Horn and a race to catch up in the past few days, the 39-year-old moved up to sixth place at his Vendée Globe premiere in the South Atlantic near Rio de Janeiro.

At the end of the 65th day at sea, the “Seaexplorer – Yacht Club de Monaco” skipper was just over 100 nautical miles behind the old and new French front-runner Charlie Dalin (“Apivia”). Everything points to a 4700 nautical mile long Atlantic thriller. “The regatta is still alive! Everything is still possible. For all of us, ”said Herrmann.

The best boat

The scenario suggests that the hamburger will advance further – he has the best of the six boats in the front. Leading Charlie Dalin and Thomas Ruyant (“LinkedOut”) both have to deal with broken port foils.

Third placed Yannick Bestaven (“Maître Coq IV”) and Louis Burton (“Bureau Valllée 2”) have smaller foils and the fourth Paralympics winner Damien Seguin (“Groupe Apicil”) has no foils at all. Herrmann has the largest, best and intact foils. The leading boats are expected at the end of January in the start and destination port of Les Sables-d’Olonne.

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Boris Herrmann is facing an Atlantic sailing crime thriller


On course for the podium: Boris Herrmann
Image: Jean-Marie LIOT / Malizia

In the toughest sailing regatta in the world, Boris Herrmann could even land on the podium in the end. Before that, there are 4,700 nautical miles across the Atlantic. But the German has a decisive advantage.

Boris Herrmann has reported back on his solo circumnavigation in the battle for the podium. After setbacks at Cape Horn and a race to catch up in the past few days, the 39-year-old moved up to sixth place at his Vendée Globe premiere in the South Atlantic near Rio de Janeiro.

At the end of the 65th day at sea, the “Seaexplorer – Yacht Club de Monaco” skipper was just over 100 nautical miles behind the old and new French frontrunner Charlie Dalin (“Apivia”). Everything points to a 4700 nautical miles long Atlantic thriller. “The regatta is still alive! Everything is still possible. For all of us, ”said Herrmann.

The best boat

The scenario suggests that the hamburger will advance further – of the six boats in front he has the best. Leading Charlie Dalin and Thomas Ruyant (“LinkedOut”) both have to deal with broken port foils (wings).

Third placed Yannick Bestaven (“Maître Coq IV”) and Louis Burton (“Bureau Valllée 2”) have smaller foils and the fourth Paralympics winner Damien Seguin (“Groupe Apicil”) has no foils at all. Herrmann has the largest, best and intact foils. The leading boats are expected at the end of January in the start and destination port of Les Sables-d’Olonne.

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Boris Herrmann on survival tricks at the Vendée Globe regatta


Balancing on deck makes him feel easy: Boris Herrmann on a comparatively leisurely training trip in September before the start of the Vendée Globe
Image: Jean-Marie LIOT / Malizia

Boris Herrmann is the only German participant in the Vendée Globe. Here he describes the tricks of survival, constant fatigue and overcoming his fear of heights when climbing masts in a storm.

When I had to find a motto for my journey so far, it would be: The pain goes, but the pride remains. Of course, I never had the intention to sail around the world just for fun and enjoyment and to make the Vendée Globe a pleasure trip, it is and remains a race. But I never thought it would be so hard. A few more moments when things are going really well and I can enjoy the regatta would have been nice. The fact that it didn’t turn out this way is partly due to the extreme weather conditions. We have seen some severe storms in the southern Indian Ocean in particular. But it is also due to the modern yachts, which are much more demanding to sail, faster and more vulnerable than they were ten years ago.

I also usually feel lighter when I’m on board and at sea. I’ve had difficulties in the past and struggled with problems in races. During a regatta, for example, my mast rail broke. But that’s something completely different when you are “only” 700 or 1000 nautical miles away from the coast with your boat – and that in a race that hardly interests anyone.

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Isabelle Joschke has to give up at Vendée Globe

Dhe German-French Isabelle Joschke gave up on the 62nd day of the Vendee Globe sailing race because of a boat damage. The 43-year-old native of Munich was the best placed woman in eleventh place when she had to make the bitter decision in difficult conditions about 1,100 miles east of the Argentine coast. The Munich-born skipper announced this on Sunday night. She had covered more than 21,000 miles of the way, just under 6,000 to her destination. But now the only thing left to do is to get into shallower waters in order not to endanger yourself with the damaged yacht.




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A keel damage on their yacht “MACSF” did not allow further participation, so seven of 33 starters have now ended the non-stop race around the world prematurely. Isabelle Joschke had been struggling with technical problems for days, now a cylinder that keeps the keel in the center failed. “She completely reduced the speed to minimize the effects of the waves and to ensure that no water gets into the boat,” said MACSF team manager Alain Gautier. The first thing to do is to avoid a nearby low pressure area and then to examine Joschke’s options.

Meanwhile, Boris Herrmann from Hamburg is still in the last third of the race and is currently eighth. Herrmann had recently had to carry out repairs on his “Seaexplorer” several times. “With this race I still have an account to be taken. I have set myself the goal of fifth place. It doesn’t have to, but it can work, ”he said.

Joschke was so looking forward to the great adventure when she got started. Food, water, clothing for heavy storms and rare sunny moments, a well-stocked first-aid kit – she packed everything up when she left Les Sables-d’Olonne on the French Atlantic coast on November 8th to roam around on her ocean-going yacht on her own chasing the planet. Joschke, who lives in Lorient, started under the sail number FRA 27.

“If I were only longing for good times, I would have chosen a different profession,” said Joschke, the daughter of a German father and a French mother, who always has something bigger than sport in mind on her adventures, before the start. She is committed to equality between men and women with her “Horizon Mixite” initiative. A topic that is also being discussed around the Vendée Globe.

Six women were registered for the current edition. Clear progress, one might think. In 2016, the prestigious regatta was a completely men’s affair. “Actually, it is an indictment that we are happy to have six participants in the Vendée Globe,” said Joschke, however, according to the “Segelreporter” portal: “Many more women would have to take part in such an event. Being able to participate. ”The British Sam Davies also touched the subject:“ We are here to show that the next step is possible. Next time in 2024 we need a few women with brand new boats as real favorites. “

The Vendée Globe is known as the “Mount Everest of sailing” for a reason. Serious incidents and even deaths have occurred again and again since the first edition in 1989. Joschke has also had experiences with serious damage to her yachts, including a mast break in 2018. “I’m not going to try to beat everyone at any cost,” she said before the start. “We can compete and still make it beautiful. It will touch me deeply. ”Now, with a heavy heart, she had to break off her journey prematurely. A few hours before she left, she said, because of the enormous forces acting on the boats with the large foils: “I can’t believe how brutal our boats are.”

33 boats started at the Vendée Globe in November. Isabelle Joschke is now the seventh participant to give up. Before that, Samantha Davies, Fabrice Amedeo, Nicolas Troussel, Kevin Escoffier, Alex Thomson and Sebastian Simon had also been hit. And further failures are to be expected. In the past editions, on average only a little more than half of the starters made it to the finish line. The Frenchman Yannick Bestaven is currently in the lead. If everything goes as planned, he could finish at the end of January.

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Vendée Globe: Ride through the world’s most dangerous sea passage | SPORTreportage – ZDF – ZDFsport

  1. Vendée Globe: Ride through the world’s most dangerous sea passage | SPORTreportage – ZDFZDFsport
  2. Vendée Globe – Boris Herrmann wants to reach fifth placeDaily mirror
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Sailors Boris Herrmann and Isabelle Joschke pass Cape Horn at Vendée Globe

Dhe play of colors at the other end of the world is quite monotonous this morning: dark gray water, white spray, light gray sky. An icy wind, one-and-a-half meter high waves and the monotonous whistling of the sails also create an uncomfortable atmosphere. Boris Herrmann had not imagined what might be the second most beautiful moment on his first solo circumnavigation of the world. The hamburger actually wanted to celebrate a small party alone and just for himself when he circled Cape Horn in his yacht. But now there was mainly relief on board the “Seaexplorer” – and a little disappointment. “It’s a shame I couldn’t see the cape. But it would have been too dangerous to sail closer to the coast, ”reported Herrmann in a video from board.

Exactly 57 days, 13 hours and seven minutes after the start of the Vendée Globe, Herrmann passed Cape Horn on the southern tip of South America for the fifth time in his life. For the first time he was completely alone. Just a few hours earlier, he had noticed a crack in his mainsail for the second time since the start of the race. Its repair cost him a few hours and dropped him to tenth place in the overall standings.

“I will not give up the fight”

Before that, the 39-year-old family man had to struggle with strong winds and waves as well as a problem with his power supply and a resulting sleepless night. “That was another slap in the face. It hurts cause I’m losing a lot of miles But I won’t give up the fight, ”said Herrmann the morning after, visibly tired, drenched and followed by a loud sigh into the camera. The obligatory sip of whiskey and the piece of chocolate, which he took with him especially for the special milestones such as the Cape of Good Hope, Cape Leeuwin and Cape Horn, he had to save for later.

The 425 meter high cliff on the Chilean rocky island of Isla Hornos is not just for Herrmann, who emphasized several times during the regatta that his yacht should not always be extended to the maximum in order to protect people and material on the more than 45,000 kilometers long journey at the southernmost tip of both American continents a synonym for extremely difficult conditions. Cape Horn has always been one of the most mystical places on the planet for ocean sailors.

Anyone who has made it with their boat across the uncomfortable and dangerous South Pacific, where the next mainland is sometimes more than 2000 kilometers away at the so-called “Point Nemo”, is believed to have the worst behind them and after almost two Months alone on the grueling journey around the globe looking forward to returning home.

And so several skippers let themselves be overcome by their feelings when they entered the southern Atlantic Ocean more than ten days after the record set at the last regatta. While the leading trio around the French Yannick Bestaven, Charlie Dalin and Thomas Ruyant has been sailing up the Atlantic Ocean again since the weekend and the participants in the rear seats haven’t even left New Zealand, let alone Australia, behind them, for example, an emotional Damien Seguin reported: “It’s crazy, I’ve shed a lot of tears.”

Passed Cape Horn in tenth place: sailor Boris Herrmann turned into the home straight at the Vendée Globe


Passed Cape Horn in tenth place: sailor Boris Herrmann turned into the home straight at the Vendée Globe
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Bild: Picture-Alliance

In fourth place, he set out on the 6500 nautical miles long and more than two weeks long journey home towards the French west coast and the destination port of Les Sables d’Olonnes. Even Clarisse Cremer, who is only 31 years old and sailing in twelfth place, could hardly wait to finally take a northerly course with her yacht: “I’ve been quite nervous the last few days and will be very happy when I see land. Most recently I had the impression that the earth had disappeared, ”she wrote in a blog post.

German-French Isabelle Joschke is also plagued by major concerns. “I’ve had a lot of nasty surprises in the last three days,” said the native of Munich, who meanwhile finished fifth in the South Pacific and as the fastest woman in the field, but is now falling further and further behind. After initially her autopilot no longer worked properly and the skipper’s yacht has not allowed the skipper to rest, shortly afterwards she lost her foresail called “gennaker” and now also complains of greater damage to her keel, which cannot be repaired alone.

You are now starting the last stage of the round-the-world regatta with significantly slower speed and “mixed feelings”, reports Joschke. It was now all about reaching the goal. Somehow. Boris Herrmann and many other skippers will share this wish with her.

The Vendée Globe is considered to be the toughest regatta for single-handed sailors. It began on November 8th on the French Atlantic coast and leads around the globe along the Southern Ocean. Boris Herrmann is the first German to take part.

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Vendée Globe: Top riders pass Cape Horn

Dhe leading sailors of the solo circumnavigation of the Vendée Globe have passed Cape Horn. The French Yannick Bestaven (“Maître Coq IV”) had reached the longitude of the famous landmark on the southern tip of Chile on Saturday after 55 days and 22 minutes at sea. His second-placed rival Charlie Dalin (“Apivia”) followed 14 hours and 56 minutes later on Sunday. The Hamburg skipper Boris Herrmann, who has fallen back to ninth place, expects his passage on Monday evening or early Tuesday.

In Herrmann’s chasing group, positions have often changed recently. The boats in positions five to eleven were separated by only 120 nautical miles on Sunday. “I have already sent a WhatsApp message to the other skippers that we have to be careful not to experience a collision out here,” the 39-year-old reported on the 56th day at sea.

How slowly the ninth edition of the Vendée Globe was due to the often unusual conditions in its first two thirds can be gauged by the first Cape Horn passages: Bestaven’s best time in the current race lags behind the record set by the last Vendée Globe winner Armel Le Cléac About eight days later. The initial storms, the less pronounced trade winds in the Atlantic and longer slack sections in the Pacific did not allow the field to advance as fast as expected.

The arrival of the best is expected at the end of January in the French port of departure and destination Las Sables-d’Olonne. Until then, the long final spurt will run with the upcoming ascent to the Atlantic. Herrmann’s forecast: “I look forward to the last third of my trip with optimism and hope to be able to better exploit the strengths of my boat in the more predictable conditions.”

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Vendée Globe: Halfway near Antarctica | SPORTreportage – ZDF – ZDFsport

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  2. Leaders pass Cape HornFAZ – Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
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