What the police shouldn’t forget about people with dementia (neue-deutschland.de)

It is as normal for people to become a bit forgetful in old age as the fact that many seniors can hear and see worse than in their youth. But this cannot be compared with the difficulties that arise with Alzheimer’s disease.

“The police are called first when everyone doesn’t know what to do next,” said Sabine Köpf on Wednesday in the state parliament’s health committee. Köpf heads the Brandenburg competence center dementia. There are such centers in many places in Germany. The center for the state of Brandenburg was launched in 2016. Since then, 2,653 relatives of demented patients have completed a one and a half hour nursing course with the help of the competence center. Social judges, general practitioners, taxi drivers, caretakers from housing associations, rural women – and police officers were also trained in dealing with people with dementia. Because the police are always or at least often alerted when the elderly have disappeared without being found or are found disoriented by passers-by.

It is possible that people who do not yet have severe dementia will continue to live in their own homes, it is possible that they will not have to go to a nursing home straight away. However, dealing with them requires sensitivity and some basic knowledge of suffering. The competence center offered all of the Brandenburg police stations to train their colleagues in this regard, reported Sabine Köpf. Before the corona lockdowns, however, only one police station could actually be visited by the experts.

Last year the competence center offered 44 courses. Some then had to be canceled because of the corona pandemic. “Our credo is that a training course like this should actually take place in every village of 200 people,” explained Sabine Köpf. According to her, it was helpful that it was possible to find a room for the training at a housing association in one place. That is lower threshold. In other words: it is easier for people to go there. Before that, they had to get together in a nursing home. But unfortunately that seemed a bit as if a nursing home was inevitable for dementia.

Around 67,000 Brandenburgers suffer from dementia. In 2009 only around 43,000 residents of the state were affected, but according to a forecast it will be more than 87,000 in 2030. This expectation has to do with demographic change.

Older people are more likely to suffer from dementia than younger people. In the age group of 65 to 69 year olds, it affects around 1.6 percent of people, in the age group of over 90 year olds it is around 40 percent. Younger people can also develop Alzheimer’s disease, but it is rare for them. It is estimated that there are only around 20,000 people with dementia who are younger than 65 years of age in the whole of Germany.

“We often talk about people with dementia, but we come to a point where we want to talk to those affected themselves,” said Sabine Köpf, who works with a small team – all women – in the competence center.

In the health committee, of course, Köpf could only talk about people with dementia and not with them. State parliament members such as Björn Lüttmann (SPD), Carla Kniestedt (Greens), Roswitha Schier (CDU) and Bettina Fortunato (left) had questions. For example, they wanted to know to what extent schools are involved in educational work. The base of the Alzheimer’s Society in Strausberg is in contact with schools, explained Sabine Köpf. But at the competence center, pupils are not the focus, even though the young people could have grandparents or great-grandparents with dementia.

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“It should not be associated with aggression. It is a transformation of the personality”

A life that escapes. A disease that transforms the person who has supported us all his life and that erases the memory. The tragedy on Tuesday morning in Via Benini again opens a window on the difficulties and hardships experienced by many families of relatives with senile dementia. “These are situations that require great care and attention – he highlights Pierluigi Moressa, psychiatrist and psychotherapist -. The person with dementia is no longer the same. There is a transformation of the personality, which is no longer self-sufficient due to the very serious memory disorder and which manifests a regression in both infantile and impulsive aspects. Therefore, lacking a part of memory and reason, certain behaviors are unpredictable. One example is the expulsion “.

Are episodes of aggression in people with this type of disease an end in themselves?
Senile dementia is a pathology that does not necessarily have to be associated with aggression. Each of us has drives and one of them is the aggressive one. So this drive can be released in certain circumstances, not automatically and not necessarily. It is one of the possible events, but let us remember that it is an unpredictable event.

We cannot speak of a predisposed personality …
No, in no way. It is an automatic behavior that goes beyond the possible control. Reduction of control, explosion of the drive.

How should a family member behave with a patient suffering from these pathologies?
There are hospital-wide units of care for dementia-related disorders. They undertake to prescribe any medications to control the patient’s behavior and to indicate assistance protocols, which may also require the presence of a qualified person 24 hours a day. Everything is linked to the deterioration of the pathology.

How has the approach to this type of pathology changed in recent years?
Associations of volunteers have been created and there are also in Forlì, which give a hand, advice and also create comparison groups based on experience in order not only to improve the type of assistance, but also to give comfort. In addition, some nursing homes have equipped shelters and this is because by increasing the duration of life, the incidence of this pathology increases.

How is the health emergency affecting the balance of elderly people?
The balances are actually more precarious, because the sources of external refreshment decrease. There is another aspect however.

Which?
In a lucid elder, the idea of ​​restriction, however painful it may cause, is associated with the idea of ​​protection. And so he is happy to be protected at home, clearly being able to receive assistance. There is also another aspect.

Tell us
Vaccinating the elderly first is a very beneficial aspect, because it gives the idea of ​​relief and protection. It is clear that the situation has accentuated the weakness of some groups in the social system and among these there is precisely that of the elderly, to whom the first thought goes as regards, for example, health care.

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New blood test determines Alzheimer’s risk – healing practice

Blood test predicts Alzheimer’s risk

A German-Dutch research team reports on a new blood test that can reliably determine the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease within the next six years. People who noticed their first cognitive impairment but who had not yet been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s were tested.

Researchers at the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) developed an Alzheimer’s blood test that can be used to determine the personal Alzheimer’s risk. The test was able to filter out those who later actually developed Alzheimer’s disease from among 203 people with cognitive impairments. The study results were presented in the journal “Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy”.

Infrared sensor detects early warning signs of Alzheimer’s

The new test was tested on a cohort of 203 people who are under medical supervision for research into Alzheimer’s disease. Blood samples were taken from all subjects at the start of the study. The blood samples were analyzed with special infrared sensors that detect the misfolding of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. Such misfolding of the protein is linked to the development of Alzheimer’s.

Misfolding could predict Alzheimer’s disease onset

The so-called immuno-infrared sensor detected such misfolded Aβ peptides in 22 of the 203 test persons. It turned out that all of these people actually developed Alzheimer’s disease over the next six years. The severity of the folding was associated with the onset of the disease. With slight misfolding, it took an average of 3.4 years for the disease to break out. With severe Aβ misfolding, Alzheimer’s disease broke out after an average of 2.2 years.

How high does the risk increase if there are misfolds?

“The misfolding of Aβ is therefore a very precise prognostic plasma biomarker,” emphasizes biophysics professor Dr. Klaus Gerwert from the study team. According to the study, patients with cognitive impairments and slight Aβ misfolding have an eleven times higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in the following six years than people without misfolded Aβ peptides. For people with severe misfolding, the risk is even 19 times higher.

Extent and concentration of misfolding

The working group was even able to improve the test by combining two different measurement methods to predict the risk of disease. Not only the extent but also the concentration of the misfolding could be determined with the help of the so-called single molecule array technology (SIMOA).

Sure six-year prognosis of Alzheimer’s

“We can now use a simple blood test on symptom-free people with subjective concerns to predict the risk of developing clinical Alzheimer’s disease or not in the future very precisely,” summarizes Klaus Gerwert. An all-clear could be given to older people just as safely, since the test also shows which people have a very low probability of developing Alzheimer’s in the next six years.

Early treatment for Alzheimer’s

A blood test for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, when combined with an active ingredient to treat the disease, would be a huge step forward. As the research team reports, the US Food and Drug Administration plans to decide on the approval of the drug aducanumab in March 2021. Current study results suggest that Alzheimer’s drugs are inadequate because they are administered too late in the course of the disease. “It’s no wonder that the previous drugs have all failed,” comments Gerwert. (vb)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Diploma-Editor (FH) Volker Blasek

Swell:

  • Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB): A prognostic Alzheimer’s blood test in a symptom-free state (published: January 6, 2021), news.rub.de
  • Julia Stockmann, Inge M. W. Verberk, Nina Timmesfeld, et al.: Amyloid-β misfolding as a plasma biomarker indicates risk for future clinical Alzheimer’s disease in individuals with subjective cognitive decline; in: Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy, 2020, alzres.biomedcentral.com

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

Newly developed blood test predicts Alzheimer’s risk – healing practice

Blood test determines Alzheimer’s risk

A German-Dutch research team reports on a new blood test that can reliably determine the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease within the next six years. People who noticed their first cognitive impairment but who had not yet been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s were tested.

Researchers at the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) developed an Alzheimer’s blood test that can be used to determine the personal Alzheimer’s risk. The test was able to filter out those who later actually developed Alzheimer’s disease from among 203 people with cognitive impairments. The study results were presented in the journal “Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy”.

Infrared sensor detects early warning signs of Alzheimer’s

The new test was tested on a cohort of 203 people who are under medical supervision for research into Alzheimer’s disease. Blood samples were taken from all subjects at the start of the study. The blood samples were analyzed with special infrared sensors that detect the misfolding of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. Such misfolding of the protein is linked to the development of Alzheimer’s.

Misfolding could predict Alzheimer’s disease onset

The so-called immuno-infrared sensor detected such misfolded Aβ peptides in 22 of the 203 test persons. It turned out that all of these people actually developed Alzheimer’s disease over the next six years. The severity of the folding was associated with the onset of the disease. With slight misfolding, it took an average of 3.4 years for the disease to break out. With severe Aβ misfolding, Alzheimer’s disease broke out after an average of 2.2 years.

How high does the risk increase if there are misfolds?

“The misfolding of Aβ is therefore a very precise prognostic plasma biomarker,” emphasizes biophysics professor Dr. Klaus Gerwert from the study team. According to the study, patients with cognitive impairments and slight Aβ misfolding have an eleven times higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in the following six years than people without misfolded Aβ peptides. For people with severe misfolding, the risk is even 19 times higher.

Extent and concentration of misfolding

The working group was even able to improve the test by combining two different measurement methods to predict the risk of disease. Not only the extent but also the concentration of the misfolding could be determined with the help of the so-called single molecule array technology (SIMOA).

Sure six-year prognosis of Alzheimer’s

“We can now use a simple blood test on symptom-free people with subjective concerns to predict the risk of developing clinical Alzheimer’s disease or not in the future very precisely,” summarizes Klaus Gerwert. An all-clear could be given to older people just as safely, since the test also shows which people have a very low probability of developing Alzheimer’s in the next six years.

Early treatment for Alzheimer’s

A blood test for the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease, when combined with an active ingredient to treat the disease, would be a huge step forward. As the research team reports, the US Food and Drug Administration plans to decide on the approval of the drug aducanumab in March 2021. Current study results suggest that Alzheimer’s drugs are inadequate because they are administered too late in the course of the disease. “It’s no wonder that the previous drugs have all failed,” comments Gerwert. (vb)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Diploma-Editor (FH) Volker Blasek

Swell:

  • Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB): A prognostic Alzheimer’s blood test in a symptom-free state (published: January 6, 2021), news.rub.de
  • Julia Stockmann, Inge M. W. Verberk, Nina Timmesfeld, et al.: Amyloid-β misfolding as a plasma biomarker indicates risk for future clinical Alzheimer’s disease in individuals with subjective cognitive decline; in: Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy, 2020, alzres.biomedcentral.com

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

.

More wine and cheese in the diet helps reduce cognitive decline

R.I.

Madrid

Updated:

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The food we eat can have a direct impact on our cognitive ability as we reach old age. This is the key finding of a study by Iowa State University (USA), published in the journal “Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease”, which reaches two key conclusions: cheese is the most protective food against related cognitive problems with age, even in later stages of life and that daily alcohol consumption, particularly red wine, is related to improvements in cognitive function.

In addition, work has seen that weekly consumption of lamb, but not other red meats, improves the cognitive dexterity long-term, and that excessive salt intake is bad, but only people who are already at risk for Alzheimer’s disease may need to monitor their intake to avoid cognitive problems over time.

Italian cheese
Italian cheese – REUTERS

The researchers analyzed data collected from 1,787 adults seniors (aged 46 to 77 at study completion) in the UK through the UK Biobank, a large-scale biomedical database and research resource containing in-depth genetic and health information on half a million participants in the UK.

Depending on genetic factors, some people appear to be more protected from the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, while others appear to be at higher risk

Participants completed a series of validated tests to assess cognitive ability, such as Fluid Intelligence Analysis, which provides a snapshot over time of an individual’s ability to ‘think on the go ‘.

In addition, the volunteers answered questions about their consumption of food and alcohol. The questionnaire asked the participants about their intake of fresh fruits, dried fruits, raw vegetables and salads, cooked vegetables, blue fish, lean fish, processed meat, poultry, beef, lamb, pork, cheese, bread, cereals, tea and coffee. , beer and cider, red wine, white wine and cava and liquor.

Perhaps the miracle solution we are looking for is to improve the way we eat

‘Depending on genetic factors, some people seem to be more protected from the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, while others appear to be at higher risk. That being said, I believe that the right food choices can prevent disease and cognitive decline altogether.

Perhaps the miracle solution we are looking for is to improve the way we eat. Knowing what this implies contributes to a better understanding of Alzheimer’s and to put this disease on a reverse trajectory, ”says the lead researcher, Auriel Willette.

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Dementia: Sleep disorder: is an early symptom *** BILDplus content *** – Guide

15 years before the onset of the disease

Foto: drubig-photo – Fotolia

Those who suffer from dementia become increasingly forgetful and find it more difficult to orient themselves. The diagnosis of dementia therefore means a major turning point in everyday life for the patient. Over a million people in Germany alone suffer from dementia.

In order to be able to take countermeasures at an early stage, it is important to recognize the first signs of the neurodegenerative disease.

▶ ︎ Researchers found a sign that indicates dementia or Parkinson’s decades before it broke out.

In BILD an expert explains how you can recognize whether you could be affected …

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This molecule warns of an increased risk of Alzheimer’s

Rafael Ybarra

Madrid

Updated:

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Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (USA) have identified a new target in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that could be used to design therapies focused on the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease in the early stages of its progression.

The discovery helps reinforce a promising approach to Alzheimer’s disease research: identifying and manipulating processes earlier in the disease’s development in hopes of slowing its progression.

“This is part of the puzzle,” lead researcher on the study, which was just published in the journal Science Advances. “We have discovered a pathway for detection and treatment before much of the damage from the disease occurs and long before clinical symptoms appear.”

First identified more than 100 years ago, Alzheimer’s is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is associated with deposits of amyloid beta protein plaques and tau protein tangles in the brain, along with progressive nerve cell death. Its cause is unknown, and its biggest risk factors are age, genetics, and a previous traumatic brain injury.

The newly identified pathway may now be the target of possible therapies that aim to mitigate the degeneration of white matter that affects the normal functions of brain circuits.

The newly identified pathway may now be the target of possible therapies that aim to mitigate the degeneration of white matter that affects the normal functions of brain circuits.

“There is growing evidence that the disease is develops much earlier than previously thoughtprobably decades before the condition can be diagnosed clinically, ”said study co-author Andrew A. Pieper.

The researchers found that the pathway, known as Drp1-HK1-NLRP3, plays a key role in disrupting the normal functioning of brain cells that produce the protective layer of white matter for nerves, known as myelin.

The dysfunction and eventual death of these myelin-producing cells, called oligodendrocitos (OL), conducen a cognitive deficits.

The new findings illuminate how OLs begin to fail: the overexpression of a certain protein (Drp1) within the recently discovered pathway.

Researchers have seen that almost complete degeneration of the OLs occurs before the common symptoms of Alzheimer’s become apparent in most patients.

Qi’s lab has patented a small molecule, known as a peptide inhibitor, that regulates the expression of Drp1, slowing down the degeneration of brain cells.

Treatment, thus, should be aimed at regulating the expression of Drp1, which slows down or reduces damage to myelin-producing OLs.

In fact, Qi’s lab has patented a small molecule, known as a peptide inhibitor, that regulates the expression of Drp1, slowing down the degeneration of brain cells.

In their work, they have seen that the elimination of the expression of Drp1 in mouse models corrected the defect related to the energy in the OLs associated with the overexpression of that protein; this approach also reduced the activation of inflammation OLs, decreased tissue damage at those brain sites, and improved cognitive performance.

Most Alzheimer’s diagnoses are found in patients older than 65, so identifying the disease in younger patients can be difficult.

Many patients experience a significant loss in white matter of your brain, fundamental for cognition, emotion, and consciousness, before receiving a diagnosis.

“Identifying how AD develops in its early stages will help scientists better understand how to focus research on possible solutions for patients,” says Pieper. “Findings from the Qi lab may help address AD earlier, which could lead to better management of its symptoms and progression,” he adds.

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Individual course predictable with a new method – healing practice

Individual Alzheimer’s prognosis based on the spread of tau

Alzheimer’s diseases can take very different courses. According to a recent study, one possible explanation for this is the individual spread of certain protein deposits in the brain.

A research team from the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) has examined the spread of misfolded tau proteins in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients and has thus shown possible explanations for the individual differences in the course of the disease. The method could also be used to predict the course of the individual disease. The results of the study were published in the journal “Science Advances”.

“Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) is one of the most common diseases of the central nervous system and is the main cause of dementia in old age,” reports the LMU Munich Hospital. An estimated 44 million people are affected worldwide. Although the causes of the disease have not yet been conclusively clarified, certain protein deposits are assessed as essential factors.

“In the course of AD, the misfolded proteins amyloid-beta and tau accumulate in the brain of those affected, which further destroys the nerve cells and the contact points between the neurons, the synapses,” said the LMU Clinic in Munich. The consequences are memory and orientation disorders, language disorders, disorders of the ability to think and judge as well as changes in personality. This makes coping with everyday life more and more difficult.

Tau proteins influence the course of the disease

Researchers at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research at the LMU Klinikum Munich recently demonstrated that the tau proteins mainly spread along networked brain regions during the course of the disease and play a decisive role in determining or worsening the course of the disease. The now published results of a follow-up study by the research team led by Professor Michael Ewers and first author Dr. Nicolai Franzmeier shows that this methodology also has the potential to predict the course.

Using brain imaging examinations using the so-called “tauPET” in two independent samples from 106 participants and 41 participants diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers examined the distribution of the pathologically altered tau proteins in the brain. The collected image data of the brain were linked to an atlas showing the connections between individual areas of the brain so that the brain regions could be identified that had accumulated the most tau at the time of the tau-PET.

Predicting the spread of tau protein in the brain

“These are the epicentres of tau pathology,” explains Dr. Franzmeier. In the further course it was shown that in the brain regions that are most strongly connected to these epicentres, about one to two years after the first tau-PET examination, there is also a high probability of abnormal tau being found. This methodology can be used to predict how the tau proteins will spread in the brain. “And that can be very different from person to person,” adds Professor Ewers.

Variability much greater than expected

Based on tissue examinations of the brains of deceased Alzheimer’s patients, the assumption has so far been that the disease process spreads relatively stereotypically for most of those affected via the same brain regions. The current study, however, comes to a different conclusion. “According to our data, the variability is much greater than assumed,” emphasizes Dr. Franzmeier.

For example, people with early tau in the right hemisphere were most likely to spread along connections in the right hemisphere, and vice versa in people with tau in the left hemisphere. “What this means clinically for the patients, what symptoms they develop as the disease progresses,” the researchers are now planning to find out in further studies, according to the LMU Clinic in Munich.

Not yet usable in everyday clinical practice

It can already be said that the new method “surpasses the previous methods of forecasting the spread of tau because it makes an individualized and patient-centered prognosis,” summarizes Dr. Franzmeier. However, up to now it has not been so precise that it could be used in everyday clinical practice in the short term, but it must first be further validated, adds Prof. Ewers.

Use for drug research

For clinical drug research, however, it can be used immediately and pharmaceutical companies researching active ingredients to prevent the spread of tau could benefit from this. “With our method, we can specifically predict where in the brain a drug to eliminate the tau pathology should actually work,” and it would be easier to determine whether an active ingredient is effective or not, says Ewers. (fp)

Author and source information

This text complies with the requirements of specialist medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been checked by medical professionals.

Author:

Dipl. Geogr. Fabian Peters

Sources:

  • LMU Klinikum: On the way to an individual Alzheimer’s prognosis (published November 30, 2020), lmu-klinikum.de
  • Nicolai Franzmeier, Anna Dewenter, Lukas Frontzkowski, eMartin Dichgans, Anna Rubinski, Julia Neitzel, Ruben Smith, Olof Strandberg, Rik Ossenkoppele, Katharina Buerger, Marco Duering, Oskar Hansson, Michael Ewers: Patient-centered connectivity-based prediction of tau pathology spread in Alzheimer’s disease; in Science Advances (veröffentlicht 25.11.2020), sciencemag.org

Important NOTE:
This article is for general guidance only and is not intended to be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. He can not substitute a visit at the doctor.

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