Prolonged COVID: These are the people most likely to get it

Many manage to overcome the symptoms of the virus after a few days or weeks, however another group of patients continue to suffer them for a longer time (REUTERS)

The prolonged COVID it has been shrouded in mystery for much of the pandemic. But new research has finally shed light on those who suffer a wide range of symptoms weeks or even months after they are no longer infectious.

The new data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) del United Kingdom now they have revealed that approximately 1.3 million people (2% of the population) in the European country they have self-reported long COVID to December 6. These estimates are based on participants who responded to a survey, rather than all members of the population who had been clinically diagnosed with long-term COVID.

The main characteristics detected among these patients included: be between 35 and 69 years old, be a woman, live in a more deprived area, work in healthcare, social assistance or teaching and education, and treat a pre-existing health condition or disability.

The U.S He reported that 64% of people who self-reported long COVID said it affected their daily activities. And the 21% said they had confirmed or suspected COVID-19 less than 12 weeks before. Around the 70% said they had confirmed or suspected COVID-19 does at least 12 weeks, Meanwhile he 40% said he had it at least a year ago.

Symptoms can include:

The ONS reported that 64% of people who self-reported long COVID said it affected their daily activities (REUTERS)
The ONS reported that 64% of people who self-reported long COVID said it affected their daily activities (REUTERS)

– fatigue

– Loss of smell and taste (parosmia)

– Difficulty breathing

– Difficult to focus (mental fog)

– Insomnia

– dizziness

– tingling

– joint pain

The precise symptoms of prolonged COVID vary from patient to patient, but fatigue is common (Getty Images)
The precise symptoms of prolonged COVID vary from patient to patient, but fatigue is common (Getty Images)

– Depression and anxiety

– Chest pain or heart palpitations

– Tinnitus or earaches

– Nausea, diarrhea, stomach aches or loss of appetite

– High temperature

– Tos

– Throat pain

– Eruptions

What should women with prolonged COVID keep in mind when resuming physical activity

Evidence suggests that women with prolonged COVID experience heart rate irregularities in response to physical exertion (Getty Images)
Evidence suggests that women with prolonged COVID experience heart rate irregularities in response to physical exertion (Getty Images)

New evidence appears to suggest that Women with prolonged COVID experience heart rate irregularities in response to physical exertion, and this has the potential to limit not only exercise tolerance but also free-living physical activity.

According to research published in the journal Experimental Physiology from The Physiological Society, In perspective of the higher prevalence of age-related physical disability among women, compared to men, these findings highlight the need for specific rehabilitation programs to manage the consequences of heart and lung problems in women with persistent COVID-19-related symptoms.

The doctors Stephen J. Carter and Marissa N. Baranauskas, physiologists of the Indiana University at Bloomington, in charge of the study reported significant differences in heart rate responses and recovery from a six-minute walk test in women several months after mild to moderate SARS-CoV, compared to what happened in control groups of uninfected people.

More abnormal heart rate responses were associated with a greater number of days of shortness of breath at the onset of the disease and a decreased capacity for gas exchange in the lungs (Getty Images)
More abnormal heart rate responses were associated with a greater number of days of shortness of breath at the onset of the disease and a decreased capacity for gas exchange in the lungs (Getty Images)

“Such alterations have the potential to limit not only exercise tolerance, but also participation in free-living physical activity in women during post-acute recovery from COVID-19.”, the researchers maintained in the publication of their results.

Although the male is associated with a increased severity and mortality of COVID-19 symptoms, recent reports suggest that women may be more susceptible to certain lung-related limitations months after recovery.

Prior to this study, hospital admissions data from Mayo Clinic they already indicated that women outnumber men 3: 1 in seeking treatment for persistent symptoms after a positive COVID-19 diagnosis. However, the influence of these persistent abnormalities on the physical functioning of people recovering from mild to moderate COVID-19 has not yet been studied.

KEEP READING:

Women with prolonged COVID may need rehabilitation to resume physical activity
What are the 55 symptoms to take into account to detect prolonged COVID
Long-term COVID risk increases when virus disrupts red and white blood cells

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