Friday, November 15, 2019
Home Technology NASA reveals samples of the moon that have not been shown before

NASA reveals samples of the moon that have not been shown before

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The capsule was inaugurated on November 5 at a NASA laboratory in Houston, NASA said on its Web site, adding that the sample was collected by the two astronauts who landed on the moon during the flight.

"Jack Schmidt and Jane Cernan collected samples of the moon in a 4-centimeter-wide tube."

Another sample is scheduled to open for the first time in January, the agency said.

"Analyzing these samples will make the most of Apollo's journey, as well as enable a new generation of scientists to refine their techniques and help prepare future explorers for the lunar missions expected in 2020," said Dr. Sarah Noble, a NASA scientist based in Washington. And beyond. "

"The opening of these samples will enable new scientific discoveries about the moon and allow a new generation of scientists to improve their methods for better study of future samples," said Francis Macopin, NASA's coordinator of astronomical materials.

"Our scientific technology has improved dramatically in the last 50 years, and scientists have had the opportunity to analyze these samples in ways that were not possible before."

Since the return of Apollo 17, the collected samples have been carefully stored in a laboratory for future generations.

NASA says most of the samples have been well studied, and many are still under investigation.

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The capsule was inaugurated on November 5 at a NASA laboratory in Houston, NASA said on its Web site, adding that the sample was collected by the two astronauts who landed on the moon during the flight.

"Jack Schmidt and Jane Cernan collected samples of the moon in a 4-centimeter-wide tube."

Another sample is scheduled to open for the first time in January, the agency said.

"Analyzing these samples will make the most of Apollo's journey, as well as enable a new generation of scientists to refine their techniques and help prepare future explorers for the lunar missions expected in 2020," said Dr. Sarah Noble, a NASA scientist based in Washington. And beyond. "

"The opening of these samples will enable new scientific discoveries about the moon and allow a new generation of scientists to improve their methods for better study of future samples," said Francis Macopin, NASA's coordinator of astronomical materials.

"Our scientific technology has improved dramatically in the last 50 years, and scientists have had the opportunity to analyze these samples in ways that were not possible before."

Since the return of Apollo 17, the collected samples have been carefully stored in a laboratory for future generations.

NASA says most of the samples have been well studied, and many are still under investigation.

NASA

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