“In 2022, multiple sclerosis is a disease that remains incurable”

On the occasion of World Multiple Sclerosis Day this Monday, May 30, Dr. Christian Recchia recalls the warning signs of this disease in young adults.

Multiple sclerosis is a disease of young adults, it is often diagnosed between the ages of 25 and 35. Today, 100,000 people are affected in France and 2,500 new cases are diagnosed each year. To date, no treatment cures this neurological disease.

In this autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, the defense system attacks myelin, the protective sheath of nerve fibers which plays an important role in the propagation of nerve impulses from the brain to different parts of the body. “Multiple sclerosis therefore results from an interaction between genetic factors and environmental factors, not yet clearly identified.“, recalls the Ministry of Health. Dr. Christian Recchia says more about the aggravating factors: “Tobacco, obesity, excess sugar consumption and recently we have just found that the Epstein-Barr virus, the deep kiss virus, may be able to cause this multiple sclerosis“.

VIDEO – Dominique Farrugia: this emotional shock that would have triggered his multiple sclerosis

Loss of sensitivity

At the beginning of the disease, multiple sclerosis is manifested by signs whose location varies depending on the location of the lesions. “It is a disease that can be expressed in many ways: loss of sensitivity on the back of the hand, loss of sensitivity on the front of the thigh, loss of language and sight in a fleeting way. These are signs that are imperceptible at first but reoccur quite often“, details Dr. Recchia. The repeated manifestation of these identical symptoms should lead to consulting a doctor.

On a daily basis, Dr. Recchia recommends respecting certain rules of hygiene of life: “I ask you to avoid fried foods, to avoid alcohol, to avoid tobacco, to practice a regular sports activity, to eat natural products, a lot of plants“.

VIDEO – Selma Blair sick: she wins a fight against multiple sclerosis

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

On Key

Related Posts