FBI investigates anti-5G act

The attack in Nashville (Tennessee) on December 25 targeted the premises of AT&T, a large American telecom operator involved in the deployment of 5G. The culprit has just been identified.

It is the tallest skyscraper in the state of Tennessee. The AT&T tower, located in the heart of Nashville, was the building targeted by the strong explosion on December 25, according to the first elements of the investigation.

The vehicle containing the explosive was in fact parked at the foot of this imposing building, at the top of which two large antennas stand. The American telecoms giant AT&T holds a lease there which was renewed very recently.

The FBI is now interested in the profile of the owner of the motorhome. The vehicle in question, spotted by police before the attack, “broadcast a message indicating that a potential bomb inside was going to explode in the next 15 minutes,” John Drake, the Nashville police chief said. a press point.

An investigation still ongoing

The identity of the vehicle owner has since been disclosed. Anthony Warner, a 63-year-old computer expert who died in the blast, is believed to have endorsed a theory that 5G could be taken advantage of American surveillance, a source familiar with the matter said. near NBC News. However, AT&T is one of the main American operators involved in the deployment of this technology.

Solicited this Sunday by the American channel CBS, Frank Figliuzzi, a former senior FBI official, in turn spoke of the trail of an attack perpetrated against a background of conspiracy theories linked to 5G, reports Newsweek. “You will find everything imaginable and unimaginable online (about 5G, ed.), And it may be that this is in part what pushed this individual to act,” he said.

Three injured are to be deplored after this explosion now qualified as “intentional”. The latter caused a very large breakdown of AT & T’s services in Tennessee, but also in other American states such as Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama, and even Georgia.