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Around 300 women in black niqabs with posters, also in English, marched through the city and professed the rigid policies of the Taliban.

Veiled women marched through Kabul at the weekend and spoke out for the Taliban.

Video: AFP

  • Hundreds of women demonstrated veiled on the streets of Kabul in solidarity with the Taliban leadership.

  • They also held up posters in English.

  • Previously, demonstrations critical of the Taliban had been declared banned.

Hundreds of women demonstrated their support for the government of the militant Islamist Taliban at a demonstration in Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul. They roamed the campus of a university on Saturday and then gathered in an auditorium, as seen in videos. The banners they carried read: “We are satisfied with the Islamic attitude and behavior of the mujahideen.” The women were practically veiled in black from head to toe.

The march was accompanied by Taliban security forces. Journalists were officially invited to report on the demonstration. After several protests this week in Kabul and other cities – against Pakistan and indirectly also against the rule of the Taliban – the Interior Ministry had banned demonstrations and declared that future protests would have to be registered in advance. Journalists who reported on the protests were arrested for several hours and severely ill-treated.

Obfuscation unusual even for Afghanistan

Many of the women in the demonstration at the university were veiled in a way that had never been seen in Afghanistan in previous years: they wore floor-length black robes and black hooded headgear. Their faces were also completely covered in black. Such a veiling is not part of the culture of Afghanistan, commented the former mayor of the city of Maidan Shahr, Sarifa Ghafari, on the pictures on Twitter. One should not impose the culture of the Islamic State (IS) on the women of the country.

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Around 300 veiled women demonstrated for the Taliban government in Kabul.

AFP

They hold up banners on which they advocate gender-segregated education or criticize women who have fled the country.

They hold up banners on which they advocate gender-segregated education or criticize women who have fled the country.

AFP

The march also holds up posters in English.

The march also holds up posters in English.

AFP

(AFP/pco)

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