Michel Audiard, 30 years later, his lines have not aged

Michel Audiard, his sparkling phrases and his Parisian banter make the dialogist, screenwriter and director a pillar of French cinema.

Of Uncle Flingueurs at We only die twice Passing by A Monkey in Winter or The Barbouzes, Parisian bon vivant films are as cult as many of their replicas. Disappeared thirty years ago now, on July 27, 1985, the scriptwriter brilliantly mixed the language of Rimbaud or Aragon and the popular language of the Parisian districts of his childhood. Even today his brilliant and funny dialogues resonate in our memories.

Jean Gabin, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Bernard Blier, Francis Blanche, Jean Carmet or Lino Ventura so many flags for a festival of joyful aphorisms and well-felt lines.

● “Me, the crazy people, I take care of them, I’m going to give him a prescription, and a severe one I’m going to show him who Raoul is. At the four corners of Paris that we are going to find scattered in small pieces, like a puzzle.The Tontons Flingueurs by Georges Lautner (1963)

● “Don’t touch the slut grisbi!The Tontons Flingueurs by Georges Lautner (1963)

● “When the 130kg guys say certain things, the 60kg guys listen to them. ” $ 10,000 in the sun by Henri Verneuil (1964)

● “A pigeon is more stupid than a dolphin, but it fliesDon’t take God’s children for wild ducks by Michel Audiard (1968)

● “ The idiots, that dares everything, that’s even what we recognize them The Tontons Flingueurs by Georges Lautner (1963)

● “When we put the jerks in orbit, you’re not done spinning. ” Pasha by Georges Lautner (1968)

● “Driving in Paris is a question of vocabulary. ” Models in Paris by André Hunebelle (1956)

● “Bullshit is like taxes, you always end up paying it.The cellar rebuffs by Gilles Grangier (1961)

● “Between crooks, profits are shared, seclusion, it adds up!The cellar rebuffs by Gilles Grangier (1961)

● “If the bullshit is not reimbursed by social insurance, you will end up on the straw.A monkey in winter by Henri Verneuil (1962)

.

Cathay Pacific Hong Kong-Los Angeles Flight Performs Emergency Landing

An aircraft of the company Cathay Pacific flies over Hong Kong, August 10, 2014. – AFP PHOTO / DALE DE LA REY

Flight Cathay Pacific between Hong Kong and Los Angeles made an emergency landing in Alaska on Wednesday because of smoke in the cabin, we learned Thursday from the Hong Kong company.

The pilots made the decision to divert the plane towards the military base of Eareckson, on the island of Shemya, which is part of the Aleutian islands, as a precautionary measure, indicated Cathay in a press release. The 276 passengers and 18 crew members of flight CX884 are “unharmed,” the company said.

A spokesman said the plane and passengers had since made their way to Anchorage, the main city in Alaska, and boarded a specially chartered plane from Hong Kong. They were due to arrive in Los Angeles around 1:30 p.m. Paris time this Thursday. Cathay Pacific spoke of the “malfunction of a cold air fan located under the cabin floor near the cargo bay”.

A passenger testified to the passengers’ anxiety when they realized that smoke was invading the cabin. “Everyone was panicking saying + my God, it’s a nightmare,” said Geneviève Cousineau to Hong Kong’s English-language daily, the South China Morning Post, about “the most terrifying moment” of her life.

Rhode Island: the smallest state

Rhode Island is making a remarkable comeback among the most popular destinations in the United States, carried by daring chefs and hoteliers who attract and satisfy the most demanding tourists.

Providence, the capital

In recent years, Providence has carved out a place in the travel book for trendy tourists. Why?

PROVIDENCE – The city has some cafes where coffee is taken very seriously, chefs who cook with local ingredients and new hotels installed in brilliantly recycled industrial buildings. All of this adds to the charm that Providence has always had, which comes from its incredible history, the city having been founded in 1636.

Many buildings over 200 or 300 years old have been beautifully preserved; even walkers who are not very sensitive to heritage and architecture will appreciate it. A walk in Providence has something solemn. When you are there as a tourist, you never go from point A to point B without stopping at every street corner to observe this or that. Providence must be savored. Even if you only spend a day on the way to the sea, you have to take the time.

* If you want to take advantage of your stay in Providence to visit some historic houses, take a look at the website of the Providence Preservation Society which sometimes organizes special activities.

THE CAMPUS

Brown University is a little outside of downtown, but it is the heart of Providence. It is certainly the presence of Brown, as he is colloquially called, that explains the dynamic side of Providence.

The heart because this campus is one of the most beautiful in the United States, but also because its students bring the city to life. Especially in the fall, when Providence is back to school. It’s a good time to visit – although spring and its blossoming trees aren’t bad either! In summer, the rhythm is different, quieter, but no less pleasant.

You have to reserve a good half-day to wander the streets of the campus. First, simply to soak up this unique atmosphere on beautiful American campuses. We think of Harvard and Boston when we walk in the small streets lined with wooden houses and red bricks. Until last year, you could meet Emma Watson there, but the Harry Potter star left Providence in the spring of 2014, her diploma in literature in hand. Damn.

To truly capture the spirit of the place, do not hesitate to enter one of the university pavilions or buildings. And if you were to visit only one, it must be the Anatheum. This small revival Greek-style building, built in 1838, looks a bit austere. Above all, don’t be intimidated. It is, in fact, a spectacular library. You can take a break in the basement reading room or in the children’s library if you are traveling with your family.

It’s not just Brown who gives the city a youthful look: Providence has other educational establishments, including the Rhode Island School of Design, to which we also owe the RISD Museum, the most famous of Rhode Island.

THE ITALIAN DISTRICT

Don’t leave town without stopping at Federal Hill, the pretty little Italian neighborhood of Providence. It’s a super authentic place: no new Italian cuisine in the area. In its small public square, in front of the central fountain, you feel a bit like in an Italian working-class city. Without fla-fla. The floor of the Plaza de Pasquale is brick and the few buildings that line this small square are colored, or have already been. There is a small terrace there, a hotel that hipsters do not frequent and a butcher’s shop which adjoins a chicken coop where you can choose the chicken (alive!) That you will serve for supper (if you are able to tolerate the smell) . If you come in out of curiosity, you will be very welcome, but you may lose your desire to eat poultry for the rest of the trip. Even forever.

WHERE TO EAT?

There is no shortage of good tables and good chefs serving regional cuisine in Providence, but it has been totally impossible to resist the charm of DenDen. This little restaurant of Japanese and Korean cuisine is located right on the Brown campus. We order at the counter and sit at one of the tables in this beautiful place, another recovered heritage building. The menu includes the classic bibimbap, gyozas, agedashi tofu (this wonderful tofu in broth) and tasty grilled eggplant with miso. Everything is excellent. As there is beer, a small selection of wines by the glass and sake, you should not hesitate to go there in the evening.

http://www.dendencafe.com/

OR SLEEP?

The Dean moved into an old hotel in 1917. The rooms are small, unless you are surprised to be upgraded to a suite (which is the size of a large room …). We also like the addition of canvases in the hotel and in the rooms. Were they created for the Dean or found in garage sales? Hard to say. The hotel is well located and the service is excellent. There was a small welcome note written in French in the room upon arrival. The place can be noisy, because located in the heart of the city: several rooms have a view of a parking lot. There is a German restaurant and a small coffee counter on the ground floor. A plus: the Dean offers rooms with bunk beds, great enough for trips with friends or family. Price: around $ 200 for a room with a king bed, but there are also very small rooms from $ 120.

https://thedeanhotel.com/

Photo provided by Mike Cohea

Brown University

Photo Stéphanie Bérubé, La Presse

Rhode Island State House

The coast

We sometimes forget that Rhode Island is the “Ocean State”: it is imperative to plan a jump into the sea when you visit it.

WATCH HILL

Small seaside town with crazy charm and chic, directly glued to Connecticut. In fact, you can easily get lost and go to the neighboring state without your knowledge … Again on the right path, mandatory stop at the spectacular Ocean House, a huge wooden hotel frequented by wealthy vacationers. It feels like a movie. Failing to pay a fortune to stay there, take a lunch break (valet parking compulsory!) On the terrace or in the restaurant, whose view overlooks the dunes and the sea. Seasons, as the name suggests, serves seasonal gastronomy made with local products, especially from the sea. On the menu: a decadent and extra-rich clam chowder and the classic lobster roll. Snob, typical and charming. If you are very, very lucky, you will come across the most famous resident of the village, Taylor Swift, who bought a vacation home in Watch Hill two years ago for just over $ 20 million.

THE BEACH

Certainly one of the most secret coasts of New England. Rhode Island has over 600 km of coastline in total. Blue Shutters Town Beach in Charlestown is very popular with families.

SURF

The beaches near Narragansett are popular with surfers.

THE PARKS

There are a few national parks and nature reserves on the south coast of Rhode Island where hiking, biking and camping are possible. Convenient for a seaside vacation.

THE FESTIVAL

If you are around in early August, and you are a seafood lover, the city of Charlestown holds its annual festival. Very popular with locals, unknown to tourists. Lots of lobster will be cooked there, as well as a host of other tasty crustaceans. From August 7 to 9.

THE ISLAND

If you’re staying in the southern Rhode Island area, take a dip on Block Island. A ferry goes there daily from Port Judith, with or without a car. It’s a nice place for a day of biking, but you can stay overnight, as there are several typical inns and hotels, no shops at all, that will remind you that you’re staying in New England.

THE Ferry

You can get to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts directly from Quonset Point. The crossing takes 95 minutes. A good idea for those who like Martha’s Vineyard, but want to add something new to their annual trip.

Photo provided by the South County Tourism Council

Watch hill

Photo provided by the South County Tourism Council

Newport, the tourist town

The very uneven brick sidewalks, the gas street lights that glow after dark, the magnificent wooden houses: Newport is enchanting.

NEWPORT – This is by far the most popular tourist destination in Rhode Island, with undeniable attractions that make it different from other popular New England cities, but also with commonalities. Very common, even: rue Thames unfortunately looks like these main streets by the seaside where successive sellers of fudge, t-shirts and alligator jerkies.

It is best to see her once and spend the rest of her time elsewhere. For example, in the small streets where the houses dating from the 17th and 18th centuries follow one another, as elsewhere the bungalows. Europeans landed in Newport in the early 1600s. It is spectacular and surprising to see so many historic buildings, some small and modest, others plush, all well maintained by their owners. It is best to take long walks, coffee in hand, to enter the wooden churches and historic cemeteries that are hidden at the turn of residential streets and alleys. Also make a stop at the local snack for lunch and visit the independent shops in the city, like Farmaesthetics, a charming little box that makes Newport care products with organic plants.

At the western tip of Newport is Castel Hill, which faces Narragansett Bay. The hotel is housed in a house with a wooden shingle roof built in 1874 by a biologist who loves the sea. On summer evenings, and even in spring and autumn, when the weather is fine, aperitif on the lawn, where Adirondack chairs have been installed. We don’t do more Rhode Island than that. The hotel has a spa where natural products from Farmaesthetics are used!

THE MANORIES

Rhode Island is a wealthy state. In the Newport area, it is possible to visit large historic properties, the Newport mansions. Three mansions stand out in size and prestige: The Breakers, The Elms and the Marble House. You have to see it to believe that “summer houses” could have been so grand. Some residences are more modest, and very beautiful, but for a first trip, the “Big Three” are difficult to get around, especially since their stories are fascinating. All information can be found on the Preservation Society of Newport County website.

http://www.newportmansions.org/

OR SLEEP?

Between the small hotel and the B & B, the Attwater is an adorable establishment of the Lark group, known for its very sweet design, mixture of bright and pastel colors which give a holiday decor to the sea. But not too much. Its location is ideal, a few blocks from Thames street and its tourists, but far enough to be quiet once back at the hotel. The rooms are very comfortable, of a good size. The decor is very pleasant, but … the soundproofing is low. Chances are you will hear your room neighbors. The service is very variable, depending on who is at the reception. Lunch is included and the originality of the dishes surprising: banana bread with donut holes, hard-boiled eggs in small tortillas, watermelon and feta salad, chia groats, scones … A small room has been converted into a café , on the ground floor. Without techno-lounge music and service, it would have been really perfect!

WHERE TO EAT?

This is often the dilemma in such a touristy city and we are rightly wary of the addresses on the main street. In this case, Stoneacre Pantry is a safe choice, if you like great food and hate bling-bling places. The place can even easily go unnoticed, discreet as it is, on the corner of a street. The Stoneacre Pantry serves seasonal, tasty and unpretentious cuisine, but with personality. Lots of vegetables and grains on the menu, a good clientele of regulars.

For a quick bite to eat in a much quieter place, the Wharf Pub serves classic pub food, but the food is excellent. We fell in love with pork and beef mini-burgers, very different from the rather ordinary little appetizers that we serve elsewhere. Obviously, there is a cuisine in this pub: the pork belly, which contained at least 50% fat, had been braised for a long time and in perfect seasoning, with frank notes of five spices. Far from the excessively sweet pulled pork served everywhere.

Photo provided by Discovery Newport

Photo provided by the Atwater Hotel

.

Rhode Island: the smallest state

Rhode Island is making a remarkable comeback among the most popular destinations in the United States, carried by daring chefs and hoteliers who attract and satisfy the most demanding tourists.

Providence, the capital

In recent years, Providence has carved out a place in the travel book for trendy tourists. Why?

PROVIDENCE – The city has some cafes where coffee is taken very seriously, chefs who cook with local ingredients and new hotels installed in brilliantly recycled industrial buildings. All of this adds to the charm that Providence has always had, which comes from its incredible history, the city having been founded in 1636.

Many buildings over 200 or 300 years old have been beautifully preserved; even walkers who are not very sensitive to heritage and architecture will appreciate it. There is something solemn about a stroll through Providence. When you are there as a tourist, you never go from point A to point B without stopping at every street corner to observe this or that. Providence must be savored. Even if you spend only one day on the way to the sea, you have to take the time.

* If you want to take advantage of your stay in Providence to visit some historic houses, take a look at the website of the Providence Preservation Society which sometimes organizes special activities.

THE CAMPUS

Brown University is a little outside of downtown, but it is the heart of Providence. It is certainly the presence of Brown, as he is colloquially called, that explains the dynamic side of Providence.

The heart because this campus is one of the most beautiful in the United States, but also because its students bring the city to life. Especially in the fall, when Providence is back to school. It’s a good time to visit – although spring and its blossoming trees aren’t bad either! In summer, the rhythm is different, quieter, but no less pleasant.

You have to reserve a good half-day to wander the streets of the campus. First, simply to soak up this unique atmosphere on beautiful American campuses. We think of Harvard and Boston when we walk in the small streets lined with wooden houses and red bricks. Until last year, you could meet Emma Watson there, but the Harry Potter star left Providence in the spring of 2014, her diploma in literature in hand. Damn.

To truly capture the spirit of the place, do not hesitate to enter one of the university pavilions or buildings. And if you were to visit only one, it must be the Anatheum. This small revival Greek-style building, built in 1838, looks a bit austere. Above all, don’t be intimidated. It is, in fact, a spectacular library. You can take a break in the basement reading room or in the children’s library if you are traveling with your family.

It’s not just Brown who gives the city a youthful look: Providence has other educational institutions, including the Rhode Island School of Design, to which we also owe the RISD Museum, the most famous of Rhode Island.

THE ITALIAN DISTRICT

Don’t leave town without stopping at Federal Hill, the pretty little Italian neighborhood of Providence. It’s a super authentic place: no new Italian cuisine in the area. In its small public square, in front of the central fountain, you feel a bit like in an Italian working-class city. Without fla-fla. The floor of the Plaza de Pasquale is brick and the few buildings that line this small square are colored, or have already been. There is a small terrace there, a hotel that hipsters do not frequent and a butcher’s shop adjoining a chicken coop where you can choose the chicken (alive!) That you will serve for supper (if you are able to tolerate the smell) . If you come in out of curiosity, you will be very welcome, but you may lose your desire to eat poultry for the rest of the trip. Even forever.

WHERE TO EAT?

There is no shortage of good tables and good chefs serving regional cuisine in Providence, but it has been totally impossible to resist the charm of DenDen. This little restaurant of Japanese and Korean cuisine is located right on the Brown campus. We order at the counter and sit at one of the tables in this beautiful place, another recovered heritage building. The menu includes the classic bibimbap, gyozas, agedashi tofu (this wonderful tofu in broth) and tasty grilled eggplant with miso. Everything is excellent. As there is beer, a small selection of wines by the glass and sake, you should not hesitate to go there in the evening.

http://www.dendencafe.com/

OR SLEEP?

The Dean moved into an old hotel in 1917. The rooms are small, unless you are surprised to have been upgraded to a suite (which is the size of a large room …). We also like the addition of fabrics in the hotel and in the rooms. Were they created for the Dean or found in garage sales? Hard to say. The hotel is well located and the service is excellent. There was a small welcome note written in French in the room upon arrival. The place can be noisy, because located in the heart of the city: several rooms have a view of a parking lot. There is a German restaurant and a small coffee counter on the ground floor. A plus: the Dean offers rooms with bunk beds, great enough for trips with friends or family. Price: around $ 200 for a room with a king bed, but there are also very small rooms from $ 120.

https://thedeanhotel.com/

Photo provided by Mike Cohea

Brown University

Photo Stéphanie Bérubé, La Presse

Rhode Island State House

The coast

We sometimes forget that Rhode Island is the “Ocean State”: it is imperative to plan a jump overboard when visiting it.

WATCH HILL

Small seaside town with crazy charm and chic, directly glued to Connecticut. In fact, you can easily get lost and go to the neighboring state without your knowledge … Again on the right path, mandatory stop at the spectacular Ocean House, a huge wooden hotel frequented by wealthy vacationers. It feels like a movie. If you don’t have to pay a fortune to stay there, take a lunch break (valet parking compulsory!) On the terrace or in the restaurant, which overlooks the dunes and the sea. Seasons, as the name suggests, serves seasonal gastronomy made with local products, especially from the sea. On the menu: a decadent and extra-rich clam chowder and the classic lobster roll. Snob, typical and charming. If you are very, very lucky, you will come across the most famous resident of the village, Taylor Swift, who bought a vacation home in Watch Hill two years ago for just over $ 20 million.

THE BEACH

Certainly one of the most secret coasts of New England. Rhode Island has over 600 km of coastline in total. Blue Shutters Town Beach in Charlestown is very popular with families.

SURF

The beaches near Narragansett are popular with surfers.

THE PARKS

There are a few national parks and nature reserves on the south coast of Rhode Island where hiking, biking and camping are possible. Convenient for a seaside vacation.

THE FESTIVAL

If you are around in early August, and you are a seafood lover, the city of Charlestown holds its annual festival. Very popular with locals, unknown to tourists. Lots of lobster will be cooked there, as well as a host of other tasty crustaceans. From August 7 to 9.

THE ISLAND

If you’re staying in southern Rhode Island, take a dip on Block Island. A ferry goes there daily from Port Judith, with or without a car. It’s a nice place for a day of biking, but you can stay there overnight, as there are several typical inns and hotels, no shops at all, that will remind you that you’re staying in New England.

THE Ferry

You can get to Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, directly from Quonset Point. The crossing takes 95 minutes. A good idea for those who like Martha’s Vineyard, but want to add something new to their annual trip.

Photo provided by the South County Tourism Council

Watch hill

Photo provided by the South County Tourism Council

Newport, the tourist town

The very uneven brick sidewalks, the gas street lights that glow after dark, the magnificent wooden houses: Newport is enchanting.

NEWPORT – This is by far the most popular tourist destination in Rhode Island, with undeniable attractions that make it different from other popular New England cities, but also with commonalities. Very common, even: rue Thames unfortunately looks like these main streets on the seaside tourist where successive sellers of fudge, t-shirts and alligator jerkies.

It is best to see her once and spend the rest of her time elsewhere. For example, in the small streets where the houses dating from the 17th and 18th centuries follow one another, as elsewhere the bungalows. Europeans landed in Newport in the early 1600s. It is spectacular and surprising to see so many historic buildings, some small and modest, others plush, all well maintained by their owners. It is best to take long walks, coffee in hand, to enter the wooden churches and historic cemeteries that are hidden at the turn of residential streets and alleys. Also make a stop at the local snack for lunch and visit the independent shops of the city, like Farmaesthetics, a charming little box that makes care products with organic plants in Newport.

At the western tip of Newport is Castel Hill, which faces Narragansett Bay. The hotel is housed in a house with a wooden shingle roof built in 1874 by a biologist who loves the sea. On summer evenings, and even in spring and autumn, when the weather is fine, aperitif on the lawn, where Adirondack chairs have been installed. We don’t do more Rhode Island than that. The hotel has a spa where natural products from Farmaesthetics are used!

THE MANORIES

Rhode Island is a wealthy state. In the Newport area, it is possible to visit large historic properties, the Newport mansions. Three mansions stand out in size and prestige: The Breakers, The Elms and the Marble House. You have to see it to believe that “summer houses” could have been so grand. Some residences are more modest, and very beautiful, but for a first trip, the “Big Three” are difficult to get around, especially as their stories are fascinating. All information can be found on the Preservation Society of Newport County website.

http://www.newportmansions.org/

OR SLEEP?

Between the small hotel and the B & B, the Attwater is an adorable establishment of the Lark group, known for its very sweet design, mixture of bright and pastel colors which give a holiday decor to the sea. But not too much. Its location is ideal, a few blocks from Thames street and its tourists, but far enough to be quiet once back at the hotel. The rooms are very comfortable, of a good size. The decor is very pleasant, but … the soundproofing is low. Chances are you will hear your room neighbors. The service is very variable, depending on who is at the reception. Lunch is included and the originality of the dishes surprising: banana bread with donut holes, hard-boiled eggs in small tortillas, watermelon and feta salad, chia groats, scones … A small room has been converted into a café , on the ground floor. Without techno-lounge music and service, it would have been really perfect!

WHERE TO EAT?

This is often the dilemma in such a touristy city and people are wary, with good reason, of the addresses on the main street. In this case, Stoneacre Pantry is a safe choice, if you like good food and hate bling-bling places. The place can even easily go unnoticed, discreet as it is, around the corner. The Stoneacre Pantry serves seasonal, tasty and unpretentious cuisine, but with personality. Lots of vegetables and grains on the menu, a good clientele of regulars.

For a quick bite to eat in a much quieter place, the Wharf Pub serves classic pub food, but the food is excellent. We fell in love with the pork and beef mini-burgers, very different from the rather ordinary little appetizers that we serve elsewhere. Obviously, there is a cuisine in this pub: the pork belly, which contained at least 50% fat, had been braised for a long time and in perfect seasoning, with frank notes of five spices. Far from the overly sweet pulled pork served everywhere.

Photo provided by Discovery Newport

Photo provided by the Atwater Hotel

.

Boston withdraws its candidacy for lack of popular support

The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) officially announced Monday, July 27, that the city of Boston was withdrawing its candidacy to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

“We have not been able to secure the support of a majority of the citizens of Boston to host the 2024 Olympics and Paralympics”, noted Scott Blackmun, the boss of the USOC.

“Therefore, the USOC doesn’t think Boston, with the current level of support, would be able to win against the superb bids from Paris, Rome, Hamburg, Budapest or Toronto. “

“Taxpayers’ money”

Earlier today, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh had expressed strong reluctance to host the event due to fears for the city’s finances in the event of cost overruns. He said refuse “To hold Boston responsible for overruns” and “To sign a guarantee that uses taxpayers’ money to pay for the Olympics”.

“If committing to a guarantee today is necessary to move forward, then Boston is no longer coveting the 2024 Olympics and Paralympics.”

Last month, the USOC reaffirmed that Boston – which had been named the United States’ top candidate against Washington, Los Angeles and San Francisco – was a candidate for the 2024 Summer Olympics, despite a strong local opposition.

The USOC said it was giving itself until August to possibly designate another American city, which could apply. Candidate cities must submit their candidacy by letter to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) before September 15, which will announce in Lima in 2017, after examining the candidacy files, the host city of the 2024 Olympic Games. Paris should in all likelihood do so. part of the candidate cities.

Read also Paris wants the Games in 2024 but will wait to consult the Parisians

The World with AFP

Dome Houses in Cape Romano: Florida’s sinking UFO houses

On Marco Island in southwest Florida, there is one luxury villa after the next, and the long sandy beach is lined with chic hotels. If you leave the densely populated island in a southerly direction, for example on a boat tour through the Ten Thousand Islands, you will soon no longer meet a soul: almost all of the islands in this species-rich natural paradise are uninhabited. All the more unusual is the sight that suddenly opens up in front of Cape Romano on Marco Island: six strange white domes protrude from the sea, they stand on stilts. They almost look like the backward setting from a “Star Wars” film; some people also compare them to UFOs or igloos.

The condition of the strange domed houses, the “Dome Houses”, is pathetic: the plaster is crumbling everywhere, the outer walls are smeared with graffiti, and water birds have left their dirt on the roofs. It’s the sad ending to a story that began as a lifelong dream and ended in financial disaster.

The former vacation home at Cape Romano is now sinking into the Gulf of Mexico
Foto: Getty Images

Dome houses in Florida were intended as vacation homes

Bob Lee, a wealthy oil producer, bought a piece of land on Cape Romano in the late 1970s to build a vacation home for himself and his family. As the online portal “Abandoned Florida” reports, he had the house built in the form of six interconnected domes. It was based on complete self-sufficiency, solar panels supplied the domes with electricity, and the rain was collected in a large cistern under the main dome, which was used as drinking water and for showering. Lee also chose the round shape because it provided better protection against the hurricanes that were more common in the area.

In 1982 the luxurious holiday home ensemble was completed, it had three bedrooms and three bathrooms. Large window fronts provided a wonderful view of the sea, which at that time was still dozens of meters away from the houses, as old photos show:

The sinking of the Dome Houses in the Gulf of Mexico

After living there for a short time, the family sold the property again in 1984, according to the Coastal Breeze News, and it was said to have been worth about $ 1.5 million at the time. When the new owner got into financial difficulties, the Lees bought the house back in 1987 and lived there until the early 1990s. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew raged in Florida and hit the domed houses. While the exterior walls were barely scratched, the interior was badly damaged because the storm broke the window panes.

Due to this and other storms, Caxambas Island gradually changed its appearance, more and more beaches were washed away, the sea moved closer and closer. Two other houses on the same island eventually sank in the water and became uninhabitable. After “Andrew”, the Lee family had again extensively renovated their Dome House, but finally had to give it up for good.

Despite this ominous history, years later someone ventured again to the domed houses: a man named John Tosto bought the property from the Lee family in 2005 for $ 300,000 in order to restore it to a habitable state. Bob Lee had advised the new owner early on to build a beach wall to protect the house. But John Tosto ignored this hint and instead planned to move the dome structures further ashore. He pumped huge amounts of money into his project, but in the end it was all in vain: for environmental and safety reasons, the local authorities decided that Tosto had to demolish the Dome House by 2007. For failing to comply, he was fined $ 187,000 and ended up losing nearly $ 1 million to his big dream.

The Dome House was never removed, which is why it is still on Cape Romano today, now completely surrounded by the sea. “It would break my father’s heart to see it this way,” his daughter said in an interview with Coastal Breeze News. “But he always said before he died that it was worth it to him for the time he was allowed to have.”

Also interesting: No Man’s Land Fort – the curious story of No Man’s Island

The Florida Dome Houses today

In the meantime, the sea has already incorporated part of the construction: Two of the UFO houses were destroyed by the devastating hurricane “Irma” and fell into the water. And of the four houses that still exist today, at least one looks as if it won’t be visible over the water for very long.

Here you will find content from Instagram

In order to interact with or display content from social networks, we need your consent.

At the end of the day, there is still something positive to report: Even without human intervention, the stilts and the sinking buildings have become an artificial reef that encourages the growth of new marine life. Cynthia Mott, editor of Florida Weekly, went snorkeling there and described her experience as follows: “I’ve snorkeled on Grand Cayman, Mexico and Fiji, but I’ve never seen a more diverse and dense concentration of marine life than that which has settled under the remains of these domes. “

.

Boston, fellows on the way – Liberation

Clinging to their iced coffee, students in shorts meet frames in sneakers that are already sweating in their shirts. On this hot morning, Bostonians in a hurry tread without even seeing it. In front of the main entrance to Boston Common Park, clusters of curious people await him on the ground.“He’s there !” : the Freedom Trail (“Chemin de la Liberté”), a red ribbon, sometimes made of paint, sometimes of bricks encrusted in the cobblestones, which incites the visitor to a curious journey through time through the monuments that made history from one of the first British colonies in the United States. From the arrival of the Puritan settlers in 1630 to the current megalopolis, via the anti-British riots – the famous Boston Tea Party – or the unanimous Declaration of Independence of the thirteen states of America on July 4, 1776 (which we celebrate this Saturday anniversary), the Chemin de la Liberté offers anyone who wants a breadcrumb trail in the labyrinth of the American Revolution.

Boston Common, pasture and gallows

We begin the pilgrimage on the manicured lawns of the very first public park in the United States where, as early as 1630, the Puritan settlers who landed a little earlier on the East Coast set up a common pasture for animals (hence its name). The ghosts of pirates, rebels and witches hanged on the spot until 1817 are today mixed with groups of schoolchildren in search of roots from all over Massachusetts, lovers of the nap in the sun or the Frisbee. If the weather permits, the visitor can easily stroll an hour or two in the aisles of the Boston Common, with a lemonade in his hand exchanged for a few dollars at one of the foodtrucks at the entrance of the park (Clover is by far the better).

In Granary, death gives wings

Finding the red ribbon on the ground, we let ourselves be taken to the Granary cemetery, one of the oldest in Boston – and therefore in the country. The remains of more than 5,000 settlers rest in this place, founded in 1660, under tombstones engraved with winged skulls. Here, John Hancock, Paul Revere and Samuel Adams, three of the most famous “British oppression” and leaders of the Revolution, lie in the shade of the blossoming branches, disturbed only by the flashes of history buffs. It was a few meters away, in the middle of downtown skyscrapers where taxis and trucks were fighting, that the injustices suffered by the settlers and these patriots were debated. The red ribbon offers a detour to the period buildings: the Old South Meeting House, the Old State House, then Faneuil Hall. Between these brick walls, from votes to fiery speeches, a protest turned into a revolution. “No tax on tea!” Listening, you would still seem to hear the rebels beating the fiscal policy imposed by the Crown in the 1760s.

In North End, cannoli and midnight ride

The red route is then taken to North End, the (today) Italian district. It’s hard not to be distracted by the many colorful facades of bars and restaurants in this part of Europe. Some will give up the right path for a lobster roll (lobster sandwich typical of New England) at Neptune Oyster, or a few cannoli ricotta cheese carefully wrapped in white boxes from Mike’s Pastry. The impatient and hypoglycemic who will not have the courage to queue in the summer sun will order a slice of well-stocked pizza at one of the counters in the neighborhood, all followed by a espresso and a pastry at Caffe dello Sport.

However, it would be a shame to abandon the path of Liberty and miss the house of Paul Revere, built around 1680, the emblem of the American Revolution. To grasp the importance of this fervent defender of colonial freedom, it is necessary to summon history.

On the night of April 18-19, 1775, when tensions between the American colonies and the British kingdom were at their height, the king’s regular troops marched in secret towards Lexington and Concord, a few kilometers from Boston, to seize the stocks of weapons and arrest the insurgents. Their plan is discovered and the goldsmith Paul Revere is responsible for alerting his friends in Lexington. On his way, he brings together all the settlers he meets and spends the night preparing a strategy for the very first battle between the rebel settlers and the British army. Her midnight ride (“Midnight ride”) is still the pride of Bostonians today, and his home is a must for anyone interested in the origins of American independence.

Beacon Hill, stronghold of abolitionism

The historic district of Beacon Hill is reached after a 20-minute walk, rewarded by the charming Charles Street. If you are hungry again, the brand new Tatte café-restaurant will appeal to the most demanding. Its adorable terrace is ideal for observing the beautiful people from Boston while enjoying a salad or a blueberry cheese cake (or both). Today, posh bistros, antique stores and small stalls preppy wish to follow each other and are not alike. A glance at the windows of real estate agencies will give an overview of the rents that the Bostonian elite pays to live on these Victorian streets.

The neighborhood has changed: at the beginning of the XIXe century, it was the seat of the free African American community. The Charles Street Meeting House, built in 1806, is the first church built by blacks for blacks, and the oldest still accessible in the United States. It housed events crucial to the abolition of slavery. Another story. Another, less glorious, path from the past of the United States of America. And to discover it, another route: the Black Heritage Trail. To be continued…

Célia Héron Special Envoy to Boston

.

5 good reasons to (re) see “Philadelphia” tonight on 6ter – Cinema News

Each week, the Allociné editorial staff gives you five good reasons to (re) see a film that it considers essential on television. Tonight on 6ter: “Philadelphia” by Jonathan Demme with Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington.

Philadelphia Bande-annonce VO”,”duration”:177,”view_count”:73926,”added_at”:{“date”:”2012-12-05 00:00:00.000000″,”timezone_type”:3,”timezone”:”Europe/Paris”},”metas”:{“genre_main_movie”:[{“name”:”Drame”,”id”:”13008″}],”id_main_movie”:9432,”image_main_movie”:”/medias/nmedia/18/36/22/26/19106161.jpg”,”localized_file_type”:”trailer”,”main_movie_type”:4002,”name_main_movie”:”Philadelphia”,”nb_days_release_main_movie”:-9671,”release_date_main_movie”:{“date”:”1994-03-09 00:00:00.000000″,”timezone_type”:3,”timezone”:”Europe/Paris”},”release_status_movie”:”Sortie en salle”,”trans_file_type”:”Bande-annonce”},”relatedEntityDistributor”:null,”relatedEntityDistributorId”:null,”relatedEntityType”:”movie”,”relatedEntityTrackingIdentifier”:”9432-philadelphia”,”relatedEntityTitle”:”Philadelphia”,”relatedEntityId”:9432,”genres”:[{“id”:”13008″,”name”:”Drame”}],”relatedEntityUrl”:”ACraHRACr0cDovL3d3dy5hbGxvY2luZS5mci9maWxtL2ZpY2hlZmlsbV9nZW5fY2ZpbG09OTQzMi5odG1s”,”mediaUrl”:”ACraHRACr0cDovL3d3dy5hbGxvY2luZS5mci92aWRlby9wbGF5ZXJfZ2VuX2NtZWRpYT0xOTQ0NDQ4OSZjZmlsbT05NDMyLmh0bWw=”}],”disablePreroll”:false,”disablePostroll”:false}” data-thumb=”http://fr.web.img2.acsta.net/r_640_360/videothumbnails/17/08/21/15/40/429142.jpg”>

What is it about ?

Andrew Beckett, brilliant lawyer, was called to a dazzling career. Adored by his environment, nothing seems to be able to slow his ascent. But, the day his associates learn that Andrew has AIDS, they do not hesitate to claim professional misconduct to justify his dismissal. Andrew decides not to let it go and attacks the firm for unfair dismissal.

It happens when ?

This Monday, September 1 at 8:50 p.m. on HD1.

D.R.

1 / For his subject:

Produced in 1993, Philadelphia is one of the first films to tackle the question of AIDS head-on. Taboo subject, it was then inconceivable to treat him in a Hollywood film with actors of international renown. Its success made it possible to break down barriers and bring this subject to the attention of a general public.

2 / For his duo of actors: It’s hard to quote Philadelphia without mentioning its main actors: Tom Hanks and Denzel Washington. The first will also be rewarded with several prizes, including an Oscar (which he will win again the following year with Forrest Gump) while the second will deliver a remarkable and surprising performance, perfectly out of step with that of his playing partner. .

3 / For his soundtrack and in particular the title Streets of Philadelphia by Bruce Springsteen which won an Oscar for Best Song. Other illustrious performers give voice in the film, including Peter Gabriel and Neil Young.

4 / For its director: At that time, director Jonathan Demme was among the most prominent in Hollywood. Indeed, he had triumphed two years earlier with The Silence of the Lambs for which he had been awarded the Oscar for best director. Despite a work very well received by the critics, it will not be retained by the Academy during the ceremony in 1994.

5 / According to a true story: One of the great strengths of the film is its story. Philadelphia is based on a true story, that of Geoffrey Bowers, a lawyer fired after contracting the AIDS virus. He will then have made his rights heard by attacking his former employer. He died in 1987, six years before the film’s release.

Atlanta deserves more than a stopover

First in the world by the number of passengers who pass through it every day, Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is most of the time the only building that travelers in Atlanta visit. The main city of Georgia, which was completely destroyed during the American Civil War, and saw the birth of Martin Luther King, nevertheless deserves to be looked at for even 24 hours.

Listen to the gospel mass at the Ebenezer Church

Built opposite the first version of the Ebenezer Baptist Church, a modest church where Pastor Martin Luther King preached, the great Ebenezer remains a place of worship for the black community. Most of the faithful are in the habit of putting on their 31s to attend the service: veiled hats, colored suits and tie suits parade. A happy painting. But it is especially for poignant gospel songs, enhanced by a good sound system, that we go there. The doors are wide open for curious tourists.
400 Auburn Avenue, Atlanta. More information on events.historicebenezer.org.

Make a pilgrimage on the street of Martin Luther King

Matin Luther King's birth house, built in 1895.

All around the original Ebenezer Church, which can still be visited but no longer hosts an office for the sake of preservation of the site, extends a small area linked to Doctor King: a few meters from the chapel, in a residential street remained in its juice, you can visit the house in which the famous activist was born. The house can be identified by a commemorative plaque placed on the ground. The pastor also lived there, with his family, when he preached at the Ebenezer. A few hundred meters away stands his burial place, where he rests alongside his wife Coretta.
More information on nps.gov.

Understanding the civil rights movement

A man in front of a photograph, taken in 1960 in New Orleans, of Ruby Bridges Hall, the first child of color to have entered the door of a school for white children in the United States.

Inaugurated in June 2014, this large center with modern architecture is partly dedicated to the civil rights movement that shook the United States, and particularly the Southern States, between the mid-1950s and the late 1960s. The first level, which offers a chronological route, is completely successful: explanatory panels, photographs and archive videos, ambient sounds, interactive experiences (you can for example put yourself in the shoes of a colored passenger who takes a compartmentalized bus between blacks and whites) … Nothing is missing to understand how dark this period of American history was both revolutionary. Thanks to the gifts of his family, it is even possible to admire what remains of the many speeches of Martin Luther King written by his hand. The second level, devoted to human rights around the world, is a little less convincing.
100 Ivan Allen Jr. Boulevard. $ 15 for full-price admission, $ 10 for a reduced rate and free for children under 6. Open every day. More information on civilandhumanrights.org

Remember at Centennial Park

View of Atlanta Centennial Park, in the heart of the city.

The Centennial Olympic Park is, as its name suggests, what remains of the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games Olympic Park, now used as a place of gathering and relaxation for the inhabitants. If today it looks like a peaceful garden with its benches and fountains, it was nevertheless the scene of the first of four bomb attacks committed by a far right activist on July 27 this year there, making 2 dead and 111 wounded.
265 Park Avenue.

Enter the Coca-Cola bubble

A view of the Loft, the part of the museum where are exposed many products derived from the red and white brand.

A few meters from the Centennial Park is the most popular attraction in Georgia: the Coca-Cola Museum, which traces the history of the famous drink invented in Atlanta in 1885 by pharmacist John Pemberton. In the grip of pains linked to his war wounds, he looked for a remedy to get rid of his dependence on morphine. These are the kinds of anecdotes that the museum tells us, through its room reserved for the brand’s historic objects, its area dedicated to the famous “secret recipe” of soda or its reconstruction of a bottling plant. We learn that Coca-Cola was originally … alcoholic. A must for all fans of pop culture.
121 Baker Street. Open Sunday to Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and until 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $ 16 entry at full price and $ 12 at reduced price. More information on worldofcoca-cola.com