Movie theme – Streets of Philadelphia by Bruce Springsteen (Philadelphia) | Indeflagration

Without doubt one of the only films that we want to put back the opening credits. This is to once again appreciate the perfect marriage between music and the scenes of life of Philadelphia residents that follow one another on the screen. I admit that I knew Streets of Philadelphia by Springsteen before the film that caused it to be written, and which I was already listening to with pleasure. But I never thought it could take on such a dimension in this film – Philadelphia – one of the first to deal in this way with the reality of AIDS and its consequences both for the individual, as a natural person, and for their social life and those close to them.

The incredible Philadelphia by Jonathan Demme (1993)

Movie : Philadelphia
Year : 1993
Director : Jonathan Demme
Main actors : Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington, Antonio Banderas

Andrew Beckett (played by Tom Hanks) is a brilliant lawyer who has grown steadily at the city’s largest law firm. A homosexual with AIDS, who he tries to conceal as best he can from the members of the cabinet where he proves himself every day, he is one day dismissed for malpractice, for a reason that has everything of a well orchestrated manipulation. But the Counselor Beckett does not intend to be conspired in this way, and, represented by damages expert Joe Miller (played by Denzel Washington), he attacks his former law firm for unfair dismissal and discrimination.

I let you enjoy this superb piece by Bruce Springsteen, which won the Oscar for best original song in 1993, and strongly recommend that you see this extremely poignant and necessary film.

42 hours in Nashville | The Journal of Montreal

Take a look at this article

Capital of Tennessee and second largest city after Memphis, Nashville is at the heart of the music industry, which has earned it the nickname “Music City”. Second center of music production after New York, Nashville is also considered the birthplace of country music. To walk in this city is to walk in the footsteps of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Donna Summer and many others.

Capital of Tennessee and second largest city after Memphis, Nashville is at the heart of the music industry, which has earned it the nickname “Music City”. Second center of music production after New York, Nashville is also considered the birthplace of country music. To walk in this city is to walk in the footsteps of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, Donna Summer and many others.

Friday

To fully enjoy all that Nashville has to offer, stay at the magnificent 1 – The Hermitage Hotel. Opened in 1910, it combines sumptuous decor, great comfort, an exceptional location to shine in the city, not to mention the legendary hospitality of the Southern United States. Of course, many celebrities (Greta Garbo, Al Capone, Kennedy, etc.) have stayed there. Do not miss the visit to the men’s bathroom (yes, yes, even if you are a woman, we have the right!). When renovations were made to this hotel, residents insisted that this magnificent art deco piece be preserved. Impossible not to be seduced by this decor of yesteryear, entirely black, in which there is a shoe-shining station surrounded by toilets, urinals and apple green sinks. Easy to access (whether staying in the hotel or not), this room is just steps from the Oak Bar and the Capitol Grille. www.TheHermitageHotel.com

19 h

Having a meal in the hotel where you stay allows you to relax a little more. We therefore opt for southern cuisine prepared with delicacy by chef Tylor Brown at the Capitol Grille, a 4 diamond restaurant (AAA / CAA) at the 5-star establishment that is the Hermitage Hotel. But if you prefer to immediately dive into real Southern cuisine (heavy and spicy), the 2 – Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant offers surprising menus, like fried chicken on a waffle, all drizzled with maple syrup! www.puckettsgrocery.com

21 h

This is the perfect time to get to the legendary 3 – Bluebird Cafe (www. bluebirdcafe.com) or to tour the famous Honky Tonks of Nashville like Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, Robert’s Western Wear, Wildhorse or Legends Corner, where many big names in country music have performed. If you prefer rock’n’roll: Exit / in, Mercy Lounge, Station Inn, Douglas Corner and many others.

Saturday

Full day on the theme of Christmas which begins with a visit to the 4 – Manoir Belmont (www.belmontmansion.com), a beautiful from the past (1850) decorated for Christmas.

10 h

Festival of the Holidays à 5 – Cheekwood Botanical Garden & Art Museum (www.cheekwood.org), the sumptuous residence of the Cheek family (the Maxwell House café). During this period, each of the rooms in this mansion turned museum is decorated with a Christmas tree on a different theme.

13 h

On the way to Orpyland, a theme park, for a cruise-meal-show aboard the 6 – General Jackson Showboat (www.generaljackson.com), a paddle steamer decorated for the occasion.

15 h

We take the direction of 7 – Gaylord Opyland Resort and Convention Center (www.GaylordOpryland.com) to fully immerse yourself in the magic of Christmas with the nearly 2 million lights twinkling inside and out, but, above all, to experience ICE. Yes, if Quebecers flee the cold for the heat, in Nashville we create a world of ice. This event, which is now part of Christmas traditions, is impressive. From the fall, sculptors cut, sculpt and paint 900,000 kg of ice blocks on a theme (this year, Frosty the Snowman), which are then brought together in a space maintained at -12 ºC. This year, there is also a section reserved for New York and a magnificent Nativity scene.

18 h

Meal at the Solario restaurant of this gigantic hotel with 2,884 rooms, which also features a river-shaped circuit that can be traveled by boat. A great opportunity to admire the cascades of light inside while sleigh rides invite to enjoy those outside.

20 h

Radio City Christmas Spectacular au 8 – Grand Ole Opry House (www.opry.com). The New York Rockettes Tour Show. This magnificent and colorful show brings together dancers, singers, actors and animals (a donkey, two camels and six sheep) to offer a moment of pure happiness.

Sunday

9 h

Time flies too quickly and there is so much to see! One thing is certain, you don’t leave Nashville without having visited the 9 – Country Music Hall of Fame (countrymusichalloffame.org), a must-have whether or not you are a fan of country music. About 12,000 square meters are collected 2 million artefacts. You could spend the day there, especially since there is also an excellent restaurant, the Two Twenty • Two Grill (reservations required).

13 h 30

We board an old school bus to get to the historic 10 – Studio B, where some 40,000 records have been recorded, of which 1,000 have reached the Top Ten. Among the latter: Only The Lonely by Roy Orbison, Dream, Dream, Dream by the Everley Brothers and numerous hits by Elvis Presley, including the unforgettable Are You Lonesome Tonight. The guide plays these tunes, tells related anecdotes, which causes many chills. To do absolutely, if only to stroke the piano on which the King played!

14 h 30

Visit of 11 – Johnny Cash Museum (www.johnnycashmuseum.net). When entering the small shop, it is difficult to imagine the treasures hidden behind the curtain. Fan or not of this singer, it is impossible not to be impressed by this museum which traces his life (from his birth to his death), his loves and his successes, on stage, in bookstores or in the cinema.

The 42 hours are over and there is still so much to see. If, luckily, you have planned a week, do not miss the Centennial Park, the visit of the Parthenon, a perfect replica of that of Athens. Inside, the huge Athena was created by the same sculptor Alan LeQuire to whom we owe the extraordinary sculpture of the Music Row district. You can even go to LeQuire Gallery (www.lequiregallery.com) and, who knows, surprise the sculptor at work. There is also Broadway Street with its magnificent buildings and small shops. And if you have children (or a child’s heart), you save time for the Adventure Science Center (www.adventuresci.com), an interactive and fun museum.

Death of Guy Bedos, “I didn’t see myself becoming the Stéphane Hessel of humor”

Comedian Guy Bedos died at the age of 85 on Thursday, May 28, 2020, his son Nicolas announced. In 2013, he had said goodbye on the stage of Olympia, after a long career of fifty years, started with Barbara and his companion Sophie Daumier, in sketches which became famous as The dredge or Holidays in Marrakech. He also played in the movies in An elephant cheats a lot or We will all go to heaven. . ” This job has worried me all my life. And it filled me too … “, He confided to The cross.

[ARCHIVE DU 19 DÉCEMBRE 2013]
The cross. When and why did you decide to stop?

Guy bedos : I made the decision in absolute calm, in the sun in my house in Corsica. It’s not the audience that’s sending me back. On the contrary. I have been a hit everywhere with this show for two years. But I didn’t see myself becoming the Stéphane Hessel of humor. At my age (I’ll be 80 in 2014), I don’t want to do the show too much. I don’t want to disappoint myself. I no longer see myself frolicking on stage as before. It would be a bit pathetic. I’ve seen too many on stage clinging and receiving only the public’s pity.

Here comes the day and the hour for me. I bow out when I’m as happy to be on stage as I was when I started. Always with the same stage fright. All my life, I remained a schoolboy in this job: rewriting my text, learning my lessons by heart, reciting in front of everyone … I also kept my child’s gaze, with the same anger and the same indignation . It gives me terrible pain, at the same time. This meeting with the public alone, face to face, nourished me so much. In this decision, there is coquetry, the pride of not wanting to become a “has been”, and a zest of masochism.

Why did you choose the olympia to say goodbye?

G. B. : I could have stopped in any provincial town, without ceremony. My friends and family strongly suggested the Olympia to me. It was pretty inevitable.

What memories do you keep of your beginnings?

G. B.: I started at the cabaret, co-starring with Barbara, at the Lock. My number was programmed in the first part. Barbara stayed behind the scenes and looked at me without laughing, while the audience was writhing … She was extremely fragile: she didn’t want to see anyone around her, not even meeting the firefighter on duty. When I asked her why she stayed there, frozen, she replied: “It is a way for me to approach the public that I will face after you. “Then I went on a tour with Jacques Brel and Isabelle Aubret. I learned a lot from Brel. On its sharp straightness. No reminder. It may come as a surprise to learn that a clown like me was influenced by Brel. I was very inspired by its rhythm.

And you end up in the same place as him …

G. B.: I thought about it of course …

At the time, who were your friends?

G. B.: My friends at the time: Jean Yanne, Jacques Dufilho. During this period of St Germain des Près, we all knew each other. I was friends with Brel and Brassens. I have sometimes arbitrated political debates between them. Then, I had a very strong relationship with Jean Ferrat. I was very sad when he died. What dominates today all these years is mourning. I carry my dead in my chest. I have had the chance to meet extraordinary people who have left before me and sometimes I will join them. I’m tired of going to cemeteries to follow those of my generation. I already have my grave, in Loumio, in Corsica, between Calvi and Ile Rousse, in Balagne.

I mourn the absence of my dear friend Pierre Desporges every day. I cannot pass in front of a photo of Sophie Daumier without bursting into sobs … I have a very particular relationship with death. My laughter is my way of finding peace. As Jacques Brel said, “I hurt others”. I was in revolt and grief very early in my life. The relative notoriety which fell on me allowed me to express ideas, feelings which I carry since childhood and which I have never given up, encouraged even by meetings that life offered me.

Do you know that I find myself having Christian behavior? I served mass in my childhood. I took refuge in the presbytery and the church. And then, the behavior of certain religious when I was in boarding school, disappointed me, to say the least. But there was something left with me. The new Pope Francis consoles me for some of his predecessors. I even feel closer to him than to some leftist politicians. This pope of the poor seems credible to me. I am seduced by his behavior.

What is your assessment of your career on stage?

G. B.: This job has worried me all my life. And it also filled me … Italian cinema expressed everything that I love: that laughter has a meaning and an emotion. What could comfort me is resuming my acting activity. Right now I’m taking notes for a book.

I will continue my press review on the Internet, probably in the form of a blog. I’m going to play a play by Laurence Jyl next fall at the theater with Florence Pernel, directed by Jean-Luc Moreau. And I’m on two film projects, one of which is with Fellag. But nothing can replace the carnal relationship, direct with the public, of the one-man-show. Neither cinema, theater, nor writing. Retirement is death. If God gives me life, I will write to the end. I don’t see myself in the pensioner’s slippers.

How do you imagine the last performance of your last show?

G. B.: I really don’t know how this last evening will go. Muriel Robin will join me on stage. There will be other surprises. I am not sure that I will not burst into tears on stage at the time of the salutes.

Have you ever regretted this decision to say goodbye to the stage?

G. B.: Yes, tonight. “What’s wrong with me doing this?” It’s suicide! I summon all of Paris to watch me die on stage? “ You know, I don’t always agree with myself.

.

Kidney transplant resumes in Réunion

Following the serious incident which saw a surgeon remove a patient’s healthy kidney instead of the sick kidney (read: The surgeon is wrong and remove the bad kidney), kidney transplants had been suspended at Félix Guyon hospital. In a press release, the ARS announces that the Specialized Commission for the organization of care has delivered a unanimous favorable opinion for the resumption of activity. Here is the press release:

“On June 9, 2011, the Specialized Commission for the Organization of Care delivered a unanimous favorable opinion on the issue of the authorization for an adult renal transplant to the Félix Guyon Hospital Center, subject to conditions. This opinion constitutes a step necessary for the decision to resume renal transplant activity in Reunion, which will be taken by the Indian Ocean Health Agency.

Following serious accidents in the care of patients, the Indian Ocean Health Agency (ARS-OI) requested the suspension of the renal transplant activity at the Félix Guyon Hospital Center in September 2010. The inspection carried out with the support of the Biomedicine Agency, highlighted shortcomings in the organization of care and inadequacies in the medical and surgical workforce.

The Félix Guyon Hospital Center has been engaged, for several months, in an important work of reorganization of the care chain, in the writing of protocols and in the additional recruitment of specialized hospital practitioners. These actions are
are translated into the presentation of a quality dossier, making it possible to envisage a resumption of the adult renal transplant during the second half of 2011.

The Specialized Commission for the Organization of Care, made up of elected officials, health professionals and user representatives, delivered a unanimous favorable opinion on June 9, 2011 on the issue of authorization for an adult renal transplant at the Félix Guyon Hospital Center, with conditions relating to the continued securing of care:
– the successful recruitment of two additional urological surgeons, fulfilling the regulatory experience requirements
– the finalization of the protocols organizing continuity and coordination of care
– additional training for professionals in the histocompatibility laboratory
The Biomedicine Agency will be associated with these verifications.

Kidney transplant in Reunion is a major public health issue. This highly specialized activity cannot be implemented without meeting all the regulatory conditions and good practices guaranteeing quality and safety.
care. Also, the ARS-OI will take care, within the framework of its missions in favor of the health of all, that all the safety requirements are satisfied before any resumption of the activity of renal transplant. “

.

City of New Orleans: Steve Goodman | Country.de

Railroad songs have a long tradition in country music. Rarely are new songs written on this subject as beautiful, vivid and lasting as this one by Steve Goodman in 1970. In Dorothy Horstman’s book “Sing Your Heart Out Country Boy” (Country Music Foundation Press), Goodman recalls how the Song:

“I got married in February 1970, and shortly afterwards my wife and I drove with him City of New Orleans on the Illinois Central Line to Mattoon, Illinois to visit her grandma. As a student, I had traveled all the way down to New Orleans on this train. While Nancy was sleeping now, I looked out the window and wrote down everything I saw on that cold April morning. “

The result was not a song but a journalistic piece of work. “When I later showed it to a friend, he told me that they wanted to take the City of New Orleans out of circulation if the passenger popularity did not increase. He then advised me, after I recorded what I saw outside, that the next step was to write down what I saw on the train. So I wrote the later 2nd verse of the song. The 3rd stanza about Memphis, that was pure memory of the student trip back then. I thought it was stupid to write a song about a train that goes 900 miles and let the song end in Mattoon, ”adds Goodman.

The “City of New Orleans” has a checkered history and played an important role in the US transportation system. As the song already reveals, the train belonging to the Illinois Central Railroad ran between Chicago and New Orleans and vice versa, since 1947. It was the popular counterpart to the much more luxurious, exclusive and expensive “Panama Limited”, which ran at night while the “City Of New Orleans” was out during the day. The predecessor of the “City Of New Orleans” was simply called “Creole” and belonged to the generation of legendary steam engines. The travel time of the “City of New Orleans” was about 16 hours thanks to the diesel locomotives for around 1500 kilometers and was thus 8 hours shorter than that of the “Creole”. Only wealthier people could afford the night train, mostly business people used it.

The “City Of New Orleans” improved the technical standard little by little, which the “Aus” could not prevent. As Steve Goodman suggested, the future of the train was already looking bad when he wrote the song. In 1971 the long-distance passenger transport company “Amtrak” was founded (it still exists today), which shortly thereafter withdrew all trains between Chicago and New Orleans, with the exception of “Panama Limited”. Amtrak brought the “City of New Orleans” back to life in 1981 when the “Panama Limited” was simply renamed accordingly.

In 1995 the route was changed between Memphis and Jackson, since then this section has been running a little west of the old route via Yazoo City and has one less stop. The route runs through the states of Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana and has 19 stops. It is now owned by the Canadian National Railway.

In connection with Hurricane “Katrina”, the “City of New Orleans” was briefly discussed because the route south of Memphis was interrupted for a few weeks.

I think “City Of New Orleans” enjoys such timeless popularity with both singers and audiences because Goodman observed it closely and portrayed it vividly. The content is real, tangible and understandable.

Artists of completely different stripes recorded this song. Some tips and where to find the album:

Willie Nelson – City Of New Orleans (Columbia)
Judy Collins – Judith (Elektra)
John Denver – Aerie (RCA)
Steve Goodman – City Of New Orleans (Buddah)
Seldom Scene – Live at the Cellar Door (Rebel) sowie „Act One“ (Rebel)
Sammi Smith – Rainbow In Daddy’s Eyes (Mega) sowie „Help Me Make It Through The Night
Hank Snow – Sings Ole Opry Favorites (RCA)
Mac Wiseman – Concert Favorites (RCA)
Chet Atkins – Superpickers (RCA)

As well as on half a dozen Johnny Cash albums.

Finally, not to forget Rudi Carrell, who made his 1975 hit “When will it be summer again?” Thomas Woitkewitsch came up with the text for this. It is often forgotten that as early as 1972 Jonny Hill sang a version based on the original, which is entitled “A train called the City of New Orleans”. There are also other German-language recordings by Indira Weis, Dieter Thomas Kuhn and Creme 21.

The latest German version I know comes from Larry Schuba. While retaining the original title “City of New Orleans”, he wrote an almost verbatim translation into German and thus once again proves what a great songwriter he is. To Germanize such a story in such a way that the content is fully preserved and the text can then also be sung fluently, that can be described as a masterpiece. Chapeau! The recording can be found on Larry Schuba’s album “Wandering Souls”.

The timeless and international content of the song is underlined by the fact that there are also versions in other languages, for example in Dutch with Gerard Cox and even in French with the star Joe Dassin. The songwriter, Steve Goodman, didn’t get much of it, unfortunately. He was from Chicago, where he was born on July 25, 1948. He was involved in folk music from an early age and began writing songs at a young age. He dropped out of college in favor of music and went to New York City, where he stayed and performed mainly in Greenwich Village. A few weeks later he was back in Chicago and continued his career there. He was permanently disabled by leukemia, which he was suffering from. Ever since he became aware of it, he saw his life as “borrowed time” that he had to use as best he could. If you listen carefully you will recognize this attitude to life again and again in his songs.

In 1970 he married Nancy Pruter, and with John Prine he met a like-minded person whose friendship lasted until death. Kris Kristofferson, whom he met in Chicago, introduced Goodman to Paul Anka, who eventually helped him to a contract with Buddha Records. Unfortunately, Goodman’s own recordings were not a sales success. Many of his songs dealt with Chicago in terms of content and were humorous, funny, and sometimes biting. Especially in country music, he remained a sought-after songwriter. His “City of New Orleans” is by far the most famous song. But “You Never Even Called Me By My Name” is fondly remembered. David Allen Coe had a hit with it.

Steve Goodman lost the battle against the insidious leukemia disease. He died on September 20, 1984 in Seattle, Washington.

.